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The Complete Illustrated One Page Bulletproof® Diet

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Common dietary mistakes will sap your energy, lower your immunity, and make you cranky. Basic unsuspected foods can make you weak, soft, and fat. Replace them with Bulletproof foods that fill you up, keep you strong, and even make you smarter.

The Bulletproof® Diet is the foundation for a Bulletproof Body and a Bulletproof Mind. It’s one of the most important things you can do to increase your performance across the board.

The right foods not only make you stronger and leaner, they can reduce your risks of cancer, heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and Alzheimer’s. The Bulletproof Diet looks related to the Paleo or “caveman” diet based on what our ancestors probably ate, but The Bulletproof Diet arose from research into biochemistry and human performance. For that reason, this diet overcomes some of the problems that can arise from long-term Paleo dieting.

Best of all, science shows conclusively (see bottom of page) that the best diet tastes good and is satisfying. It’s not vegan, it’s not low-fat, and you don’t need to limit calories or eat frankenfoods like tofurkey.

This is what I distilled from consuming countless thousands of research papers online, spending more than 10 years working with some of the world’s top health and nutrition researchers, reading over 150 nutrition books, and self-experimenting for 15 years. Just eat the stuff on the left below and watch what happens. No calorie counting, no measuring. Just eat and feel your brain, body, and hormones re-awaken as your effortlessly lose weight and gain muscle on little or no exercise.

Target 50-60% of calories from healthy fats (this is easy and tastes good), 20% from protein, and the rest from vegetables.

This diet has helped countless people. The Better Baby Book featured a version of it for optimizing pregnancy. If you’re one of the people who has benefited, please post a comment here!

Every few months, we update the Bulletproof® Diet with the latest findings from research and experimentation, usually by shifting recommendations slightly in one direction or another or adding new foods. This is the 2011 version 2 of the Bulletproof diet. The latest version of the diet can found here.

Sign up for our email newsletter on the right, to be notified of new posts on The Bulletproof Executive. We’ll include a printable version of the Bulletproof® Diet.

Click here for a step-by-step guide to eating the Bulletproof Diet.

Research proving this diet works.

This is a list of studies behind the principles of this diet.  It will be updated as new research becomes available.

Cereal grains contribute to nutrient deficiencies, autoimmune disease, impaired digestion, and contain opioids which make them addicting. (1)

Switching from refined grains to whole grains causes zinc deficiency. (2)

Diets high in grain fiber deplete vitamin D stores. (3)

Phytic acid from whole grains block zinc and other minerals. (4)(5)

Removing grains, legumes, and processed dairy while increasing protein intake produces greater insulin sensitivity in animals and humans. (6)(7)

Brown rice (not white) prevents protein digestion and lowers nitrogen balance (a marker of muscle retention). (8)

Gluten and other grain proteins dysregulate the junctions between intestinal cells and increase cancer risk. (9)

80% of long term vegans are deficient in vitamin B12, which is needed for proper mental function.(10)

50% of long term vegetarians are deficient in vitamin B12. (11)

B12 deficiency causes dementia, cognitive impairment, depression, and degenerative mental disorders.(12)

Kids who eat a vegan diet are deficient in B12 and have impaired brain function.  This reverses when they start eating animal products. (13)

Vegetarians and vegans have lower muscle creatine and carnosine levels. (14) (15)

The China Study is a collection of poor research and misinterpreted results. (16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21)

Grass-fed meat is higher in omega-3’s, CLA, TVA, vitamins, minerals, carotenoids, and antioxidants. (22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27)

The longer an animal is fed grains, the more nutrients are lost. (27)

Eating grass-fed meat boosts omega-3 levels more than can be explained by the amount of omega-3’s in the meat (grass-fed meat is better than omega-3 supplements). (28)

A lower ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids reduces inflammation and protects against disease. (29)

Saturated fat is not associated with cardiovascular disease.  This is supported by almost every high quality observational study ever conducted (not that this really matters, since it’s observational data).  (30) (31)

Saturated fat does not raise cholesterol levels over time. (32)

Saturated fat raises HDL cholesterol, lowers triglycerides, and decreases the oxidation of cholesterol. (33, 34)

A diet high in saturated fat improves blood vessel function (don’t be fooled by the title of this study, read Chris Masterjohn’s take on what this study actually showed). (35, 36)

To get all the micronutrients your body needs from the USDA (DASH) diet, you would have to eat 33,500 calories a day. (37)

Vitamin D affects over 1000 genes in the human body. (38)

Magnesium deficiency exacerbates insulin resistance. (39)

Eliminating artificial colorings and food allergens improves ADHD symptoms. (40)

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  • Leon

    Wow Dave, great stuff! Very comprehensive but accessible at the same time (good work with the graphs!). Couple of questions if i may:- This stuff seems to cross-over into the content of your book, how much more of the book will be relevant for non-baby producing purposes?- You and Tim Ferriss disagree about the suitability of beans. Given that you’ve spent some time talking to him, what is the basis of your difference of opinion?- Where do smoked foods fit on the spectrum? is there a difference between cold and hot smoked food?Brilliant work as always.CheersLeon

  • Marion Roach Smith

    Great visuals. Easy to follow and remember. We all owe you a huge debt of gratitude for this.

  • justin owings

    Nice distillation of a lot of information – like the graphs (though they leave me wanting to know why some foods that are ostensibly green (pastured chicken) aren’t.I’d like to also add that while insulin control is paramount for better health and repairing a broken metabolism, for weight loss the golden ticket is low insulin and a caloric deficit. Even in the absence of insulin fat can still be stored via de novo lipogenesis.

  • Kevin Beckford

    Excellent work. Thanks.

  • jonathanchard

    Thanks for this, now the next question is – do you have any recipes?! Seems the only “staple” we’re allowed to eat is brown rice. That must get a bit old pretty quickly. Do you have any sample meals that you regularly make? May try and slip some of these into our menu at home.

  • Dave Asprey

    @leon Thanks! This is indeed cross-over from the research in my book. So far, the physicians & health experts who review the book say it’s great advice for everyone. I’d say that 3/4 of the things a pregnant woman can do to be optimally healthy apply to anyone looking to optimize their health. My next book will talk about what the rest of us who aren’t pregnant can do to be higher performing and more resilient in our health.@Marion – You’re welcome!@Justin – Much appreciated. Over time, I’ll link these to blog posts explaining why they are the way they are. Every single item on this graph is there based on a combination of fatty acid analysis, toxin levels, amino acid content, etc. Pastured chicken fat is still mostly omega-6 PUFA, which is just bad news. In the upcoming book, we say that if you’re going to eat chicken, toss the skin as chicken fat is not good for you. But if you’re eating grass fed red meat, keep the fat. Chicken isn’t nearly as good for you as other meats. However, the caloric deficit thing is a vicious rumor that has broken many people’s thyroids as they try to lose weight on a caloric restricted diet. Taubes pretty much nailed the science in “Good Calories, Bad Calories” but I biohacked my way to understanding that calories are a nearly insignificant piece of the healthy & fast weight loss equation. Evidence: I eat 4-5,000 calories per day on this diet, I don’t work out more than 10 minutes a week, I sleep 5 hours a night, and I’m on airplanes every week, yet I have a 6-pack. My VLDL is 10. My HDL is 81. Triglycerides are 48, etc. @Halfmanhalfgeek, the only recipe online so far is for Bulletproof Coffee. I’ve developed a bunch of them over the years, and some of them are simply amazing. I will get around to posting them over time. Coming soon: Ice cream that boosts hormone levels enough that if you share it with your significant other, you can pretty much bet on “getting some…” Most of what I eat is a variant on “meat + vegies mixed with fat” but that gives you amazing options.

  • Dave Asprey

    @leon About beans and Tim Ferriss in Four Hour Body, there is little science in Tim’s recommendation of beans. He says it’s for “caloric density” but I humbly submit that butter is much more calorically dense. Beans create GI distress with their excess fiber, and they contain lectins which are small proteins that stick to the sugars that coat your cells, wreaking biological havoc. That’s why you have to carefully soak most beans before you can eat them. For carbs (which aren’t necessary in the diet most of the time) sweet potato and yam are far better sources than beans. Smoked foods – excellent question, and I need to update the graphic to include those. Hot smoked is not good from a toxin formation perspective, unless you use biochemistry to block those toxins (what I do – another post coming…) Cold smoked is usually ok. Cold smoked sockeye salmon is a major food group for me.

  • Kent Ross

    Dave, what’s your take on post workout carbs? Most ‘muscle building’ material I’ve seen indicates that insulin release is a necessary component of getting nutrients to muscle cells (as well as fat cells) so that if you are looking to gain muscle it is important to eat carbohydrates after lifting.

  • Kent Ross

    Also, if you are an athlete interested in maintaining performance (and not just working out for health benefits) is it necessary to eat carbs to replenish glycogen? My understanding was that protein / fat do not replenish glycogen necessary for high intensity anaerobic exercise?

  • Steve
  • amir

    Hi Dave, I have a couple of questions. 1) Whats wrong with onions and garlic?2.) When you mentioned palm oil, are you referring to the red palm oil or the Refined, bleached, deodorized palm oil?

  • Michael Farace

    Dave, not sure if this is the right place to ask this, but I know you are king of supplements also. In addition to eating a healthier diet, do you have suppliments to suggest to boost the immune system? My thoughts are related to international trips, where you can be exposed to more “bugs” you are not used to, and have risks of accidently being exposed to water that is not healthy (Mexico, Russia and India are countries I have in mind regarding this). I was curious if there were ways to “turbo charge” your immune system to reduce risk of getting sick on such trips. thanks! All this info is great!

  • Shelly
  • Dave Asprey

    @Kent – Post workout carbs are, in a word, evil. They will escort nutrients into cells because they raise insulin. Insulin has the same effect as “Insulin-like growth factor” (aka IGF-1) which is related to growth hormone functions. Muscles will grow because you rely on insulin instead of IGF-1. It’s a short-term hack that unfortunately sabotages you in the long term. Carbs after working out will tilt you away from growth hormone and testosterone production and toward cortisol and estrogen production. They teach your body to burn carbs or protein preferentially instead of fat. Carbs are low-octane, making 2 ATPs for every one burned. Fat makes 28 ATPs. If you teach your body to burn carbs, it will preferentially burn protein (muscle) by turning it to glucose before fat. If your goal is massive muscle growth, you can use carbs and put on some serious fat and muscle simultaneously, then shed the fat and keep the muscle, which is a very 1990′s approach. A more useful way to maintain general health and build muscle without gaining tons of fat is to use the Bulletproof Diet, which will keep your hormones and brain working optimally, regardless of how much (or how little) you exercise.

  • Dave Asprey

    @Steve – Piracetam is available at http://ow.ly/4RpeU and widely across the web. @Amir – Onions and garlic both have an unstable nitrogen bond – chemically not that different from THC – that is proven to be neuroactive. It reduces alpha (relaxed, alert, learning, performing) brain waves and increases stress. Yes, they’re antifungal, but if you want to be high performing cognitively, they are a hinderance. Takes 4 days for garlic’s negative effects to wear off. A blog post on this coming soon. Palm oil is fine as red (tastes awful to me) or RBD and both are safe as long as the RBD was expeller pressed, not chemically refined with solvents.@Mike – I didn’t get food poisoning once in 3 months of travel in remote parts of Asia, including eating street food in Tibet that made everyone else in my party sick. The trick is to use grapefruit seed extract (also sold as “Traveler’s Friend” from Nutrabiotic http://www.nutriteam.com/index2.html) with every meal, and to take a probiotic regularly, either Culturelle or Primal Defense.

  • Kent Ross

    Thanks Dave. What about the other concern about glycogen stores for athletic performance?Also, if your goal is to lose fat as quickly as possible, is it still best to eat this way and not worry about creating a caloric deficit? It seems like long term your thyroid function might match any healthy food intake you have, but over periods of a few weeks to a few months it would be much more effective to use a low calorie week / cheat day type of approach.

  • jonathanchard

    Re: Boosting your immune system. I heard your interview on the Speculist podcast where you recommended taking vitamin D3 for this. Is this in addition to, instead of, or superseded by grapefruit seed extract?

  • Sheilagh

    Great work! In the event that one is low-carb, what are the issues with mushrooms? Particularly medicinal ones like Reish, Cordyceps, maitake, or Shiitake? Their digestive enzymes may be beneficial, at least for those who can tolerate them.

  • Kent Ross

    Also, what is your take on animal research that shows that being on a high fat diet is strongly linked with decreased insulin sensitivity?

  • Elizabeth U

    why is cheese bad? where does yogurt (the kind you’d buy in the grocery store) fall? And what are you supposed to do if you don’t have a farm nearby giving you access to unpasteurized milk? (and even if you do have that farm nearby, they’re not really supposed to be selling raw milk, it’s illegal, right?)

  • chrisyeh

    A while back, I needed to lose a bunch of weight. I just happened to have lunch with Dave at the time, right as he was developing the Bulletproof Diet. I immediately adopted his diet (though Dave had to suffer through quite a large number of emails from me asking, “Is it okay if I eat X?”). I lost 25 pounds in 75 days, and got down to my college weight. And I’ve kept it off. Dave’s diet works.

    • Dave Asprey

      Thanks Chris! For those of you who don’t know him, Chris runs http://www.asktheharvardmba.com/ and is a well known Silicon Valley executive. He’s also the former CEO of ustream.tv, one of the top video sites on the Internet.

      Chris is a total badass. Now he’s a thinner, smarter total badass. :)

  • Dave Coles

    If the goal is 50-60% of calories from healthy fats that implies that healthy fats are full of nutrients. Could you expand on this? Also, what keep fats down the gullet from becoming fat around the waistline?

  • Kevin Beckford

    Actually, I think healthy fats are full of energy, if I understand things correctly. If you had a furnace inside of you, then burning a donut in a flame and burning a slab of fat or a nice juicy steak would be roughly equivalent.  I believe that the donut kick off a cascade of chemical processes that make you tend to store fat.  Sensible, since on the savanna, a gut full of berries means no damn meat, and that's always bad news. Fat and protein pretty well come together, so you don't need that cascade in the latter two cases. Belly full of fat and meat means the good times are here.

    • Zorica

      …and it’s cool once you realize how badly adapted we are for a ‘savannah’ anyway. Since the divergence from apes and having a lot of aquatic influence (look at our similarities with aquatic mammals instead of primates), then realizing that eating protein and fat (probably higher emphasis on seafood, ‘but hey, I LOVE my grass fed beef, lamb and sometimes bison/buffalo’) is actually what we’re adapted for…along with cold (see Jack Kruse)…so even using the ‘but we didn’t know where our next meal came from so therefore we store fat…is not as prudent as previously thought? In the end: Eat to satisfaction which is based on BP diet anyways! Cheers!

  • Dave Coles

    Kevin – Thanks for responding. I understand what you mean. I know fats are full of energy – i.e. calories – but so is sucrose. That doesn’t make drinking a soda a good dietary transaction. My question was about nutrients. Other than fatty acids what am I getting to benefit my body and have a healthy metabolism by eating “healthy fats” and taking the calorie hit? Vitams/Minerals/Amino Acids, etc.? In quantity or just in trace amounts? And again, what keeps fats down the gullet from becoming fat around the waistline?

  • molite

    What about microwaving why is it in the worst area of the graft?

  • Kent Ross

    Dave Coles – As far as micronutrients go, it really just depends on what you eat. With this diet you will be eating lots of animal fats from healthy animals, which contains all of the fat soluble vitamins such as Vitamin A, D, E, and K. You will also be eating a complete amino acid profile as most animal products have complete proteins. There is also no restriction on the amount of vegetables such as spinach (which have high amounts of potassium, magnesium, calcium, etc) so if you eat these types of vegetables you should be fine. To your second question, this is more completely answered if you read the book Dave Asprey recommends (Good Calories, Bad Calories) or the same authors follow up book, ‘Why We Get Fat – And What To Do About It.’ Without getting into all of the detail, the quick summary is that accumulation of fat on the body is primarily a disorder of how much insulin we secrete, not an issue of how much we eat. The idea is that if we rebalance our insulin levels, then any calories we eat will be burned by the body very quickly, so it will never become body fat.

  • Tubalard

    “Evidence: I eat 4-5,000 calories per day on this diet, I don’t work out more than 10 minutes a week, I sleep 5 hours a night, and I’m on airplanes every week, yet I have a 6-pack”Ok, I hope you agree that this sounds like BS prima facie. My default stance on claims like this (as well as Nigerians offering me millions of dollars to place in my bank account) is to ask for some proof:How do you verify your caloric intake and energy expenditure? (self-reported intake is notoriously inaccurate, as you must know…been proved in multiple studies using doubly labelled water).Do you have a pic of your 6 pack? (please, no “I haven’t taken one yet” responses…any guy who actually has one will have taken stupid quantities of pics to prove it).Until then, I’m going to assume you’re full of it…which is, of course, the only reasonable thing to do.CheersTubalard

  • Dave Asprey

    @Kent – you use up glycogen pretty fast. Even Dr. Sears on the dated Zone diet got major improvements with Stanford’s swim team when he added more fats – and those were omega 3/6 blends, not the good stuff (butter, coconut oil). That said, eat some yams if you’re worried. Just soak them in butter first. :)@halfmanhalfgeek – D3 is vital by itself. Top recommendation. GSE is a natural antimicrobial that stops yeast, bacteria, and some parasites. I only use it when traveling to strange places now, but used it daily for several years when getting better. Overuse can cause slower P450 (liver) function, but that is not a concern at normal levels.@Kent Ross – High fat diets & insulin sensitivity – high in what kind of fats? MCT oils have a different effect than hydrogenated cottonseed oils. “High fat” is meaningless without knowing what kind of fat. It’s like saying “high liquid” without knowing if you’re comparing Coke to water.@Sheilagh – mushrooms aren’t too low carb, they fuel yeast growth in the body, and most varieties that are common are tied to smooth cell wall proliferation. Medicinal ones, in medicinal quantities, are probably fine, and can be super immune stimulating.@Elizabeth U – Cheese concentrates the denatured casein (inflammatory) and the toxins from the fungus that makes cheese and the mycotoxins from the animal feed. It is almost universally inflammatory. Yogurt – raw – is probably fine but pasteurized is not a health food by any measure. If you want bacteria, take a pill. Instead of milk, try coconut milk or undenatured whey protein. Raw milk is not illegal in many states – whole foods sells it in California for instance. But raw dairy is a luxury; pasteurized grass fed butter is the most important by far.@ChrisYeh – Rock on my friend! Time for dinner soon. Sashimi? ;)@DaveColes & Kevin Beckford – we have neither gullets (we’re not birds) nor furnaces (we’re not coal-powered robots, although that would be kind of cool.:) We’re amazing biochemistry factories that break foods into usable components, some of which are ingredients to make ATP via the Krebs cycle. We don’t burn it into ash. We don’t fart smoke, and we don’t poop ash. If a calorie is a calorie, which is the dominant belief, then why don’t we all eat wax, which is very high calorie per gram, and would provide our “energy” requirements? Because the only variable that matters is what we do with the food we eat, not how many calories are in it. Fat is higher calorie per gram than sucrose. Kevin is right in recommending Taubes “Good Calories, Bad Calories” for an exhaustive explanation of why the composition of what you put in your “gullet” is far more important than how much. High caloric density healthy fats give the liver energy to detoxify things better than lower caloric density foods. Europeans who lived with Eskimos on 100% meat for 2+ years have NO scurvy. Scurvy is a disease of carbohydrate consumption, not lack of vitamin C consumption. There is simply no such thing as a “calorie hit” as Dave Coles describes. There is an insulin hit and a glucose hit, however. You need to eat some meat too, not just fat. Meat has everything you need in it (after all, you are made of meat, which is concentrated vegetables mostly anyway) @Molite, microwaving is bad as it heats some areas (very small ones) in food to incredibly high temperatures, which completely denatures proteins in the vicinity, making for inflammatory food. Microwave only plain water. Or use a kettle like I do! :)@Tubalard – You’re right. I made all this crap up, including the 1000+ references that are going in to my book. The one Wiley is publishing. My hot Swedish physician wife who also eats this way and co-authored the book actually doesn’t even exist; she’s really a sock-puppet. From Nigeria. I made all these graphs up while I was getting high from freebasing McDonald’s milkshakes and soy powder. That video of me at the BIL conference was actually an actor, because I weigh 1200 pounds now and have a horn growing out of my forehad. Yes, I have pictures of my 6 pack. Are there any other parts of my naked anatomy you’d like me to post? I have size 16 feet if you’re into looking at those too. Sometimes I wear sexy wool hiking socks… As for verifying caloric expenditure, I was CTO of Basis, a 24/7 heart rate/activity/calorie monitor that uses way more data than a pedometer like Fitbit. But I don’t claim to measure my caloric expenditure because that’s junk science without a university grade caloric expenditure lab. You need to know your temperature, the room temperature, air speed, humidity, activity levels, heart rate, breath gas mix going in and out, altitude, etc. to accurately know caloric burn. Those laughable numbers you see on health club machines are there to make you feel good. They are stupidly inaccurate. Calories in minus calories out is a mean, fake equation designed to increase the perceived value of crappy low calorie food and hours of cardio on expensive machines.As for how I verify my caloric intake, I have a digital scale with gram-level accuracy. Yesterday my morning coffee had 90 grams of grass-fed Kerry Gold in it, which is 84% fat, and 90 grams of coconut oil, and 2 Tbs of MCT oil (just the capric and caprylic triglyceride MCT parts…) Then I had 5 eggs for lunch with butter, avocado, and jalapenos. Large size, pastured, no grain, orange colored yolks. And 2/3 lb of grass-fed beef, plus asparagus (didn’t bother weighing it) with 3 Tbs of Kerry Gold and 1Tbs MCT oil. Dinner was 1.3 lbs of extra-fatty grass fed lamb. Had some coconut-collagen protein powder from http://www.upgradedself.com, 2 raw eggs, a scoop of 20 g whey, and some smoked salmon too. You do the math. I don’t weigh every day because after a certain point, it doesn’t add any more useful information. My 27 year old business partner Andrew, who will be blogging here soon, carefully tracks his calories and is on the program – has been for 2+ years. More data and confirmation there.

  • Kevin Beckford

    @Dave, you really should try posterous’ group feature, might be more suited to this type of discussion

  • Dave Asprey

    @Kevin, just checked it out. I even saw Posterous give me their VC fundraising pitch last year. The lack of threaded comments just sucks now that Bulletproof Executive has become this popular. There is no way to add threaded comments from Groups to this blog; I’d have to start another. I’m thinking it’s time to switch to WordPress. It would give me a blogroll without needing Flash, so I could ditch that awful flash app on the home page. Thanks for the prodding! :)

    • Dave Asprey

      Sweet! We’re on WordPress now! Loving it…

  • Tubalard

    Ok, so…on your side there’s “shut up and just believe me ok…I really do eat 5000 calories a day, only exercise 10 mins a week…and have a six pack…” and on the other there’s mountains of metabolic ward studies and other RCTs showing that 5000 cals/day and a six pack are not gonna live in the same place without some serious energy expenditure…Hmm, who should the wise man believe? The empirical corpus of evidence or the author with a book to sell?P.S. No other body parts are relevant…you claimed the six pack…post the pic of the six pack. At least you can verify that this part of the spiel is on the up and up…we’ll just have to take the energy intake and expenditure on faith.

    • Dave Asprey

      Dear Tubalard, ok, the pic is posted. I also emailed you pictures of my feet because I have a strange feeling you want to see those too. I simply can’t believe the total pervs who read my human performance blog…

  • Dave Coles

    At 4,000 calories per day (the low end of the range David eats daily) 60% healthy fats is 2,400 calories (not hard to do since the oils are so calorie rich) and protein, at 20% of intake, is 800 calories – a good 12 ounce beefsteak will see to that. But how to I manage 800 calories (the last 20%) in vegetables daily? Eat 2.6 avacados every day? There are 59 calories in a pound of bok choy – if I ate 10 pounds a day I still would’nt reach 800 calories. Any advice?

  • Dave Asprey

    @Dave – 2.6 avocados is perfect! :) Seriously, I do eat 1-2 every day, and I’ve been known to eat a large tub of guacamole for lunch when I’m on the road. It’s also ok to eat less vegetables. I was on a series of flights yesterday, and in the course of the day I had 4 eggs, 3/4 lb butter, 1.5oz MCT oil, 8 oz salmon, some coconut collagen protein powder from http://www.upgradedself.com, and a massive ton of sushi when I finally found a restaurant for dinner. The only vegetables I had were the avocado in the sushi and a small salad (no omega-6 dressing). If I’d been at home, I’d have eaten a lot more red meat, and had much larger salad and steamed cauliflower “creamed” with butter. But the veggies are the *least* important part of the diet, and entirely optional when inconvenient. :)

    • Zorica

      The ‘creamed’ cauliflower is what I eat too! I mash mine…it’s DELISH!

  • Kent Ross

    Dave – I’m assuming it’s fair to say that we should not be striving to have 4000-5000 calories like you do, but to eat the right kinds of food until we feel satisfied. Everyone’s metabolism is different so there seems to be no need to force extra butter down if you are full of energy without it?

  • Dave Asprey

    @Kent – Thank you. That is really important and needs to be said. I weigh about 210 lbs and I burn more calories because I sleep less (on purpose), travel a lot, and I hacked my body temperature to be slightly higher than it used to be so I could have higher efficiency and performance (yes, I’ll blog on that too – it’s thyroid related). But most people aren’t as muscular or as tall as me, and they don’t need 4,000 calories. I eat this way because after careful measurement of how I feel – and my blood chemistry and overall health – this is what works best. I’d eat 1500 calories if that worked better, or I’d eat all insects for that matter – my goal is massive mental performance, immune function, muscle mass maintenance, health, and anti-aging, etc. As Henry Miller puts it, “”The goal of life is not to possess power, but to radiate it.” To radiate power, you need to eat. What is CRITICAL in the Bulletproof Diet is that you keep your percentage of calories from fat above 50%, and you make sure that at least half of your fat calories are from the Four Horsemen of Fats – coconut, grass-fed butter, grass-fed beef & lamb, and palm oil. You get an extra boost from the MCT oil I use (www.upgradedself.com), which is unique in that it contains only the most important two out of the 4 medium-chain oils. By boosting the percentage of those 2 – capric and caprylic triglycerides – in your fat intake, you get a large fat-burning and energy-building benefit. You are not on the Bulletproof Diet if you are eating lots of omega-6 inflammatory oils, as the inflammation will screw you up. The same thing will happen if you deep-fry your vegetables because even the healthy oils can get heat damage. So eat until you’re full, and as often as you want. Do not limit calories, but there’s no need to stuff yourself unless you’re on a muscle-building heavy exercise program. (unless you just like the full feeling…you will not get fat from eating a lot of calories, as long as they’re the right calories.) The fact that I am alive and thriving in my Bulletproof life on 4,000 calories a day, and have been for years, should be a wake-up call to people on low-calorie diets: The calorie is dead. Scientists focused on them because it’s easy to measure their intake (but not their use). Now we know more. Sorry about all those horrible low-calorie meals. They weren’t good for you. :)

    • Zorica

      There are times where I am forced to get less than 6 hrs of sleep. (Luckily this is not a regular thing—I don’t like sleep hacking at this point in my life, because I am afforded a generous 8-9 hrs a night which I like to take advantage of).

      Would making sure to eat MORE calories (probably from fat) be ideal for short sleep nights? As in, would this help one to stay up longer and have more ‘energy’ as in immune and/or lessen effects from cortisol? Should I just go based on ‘how my body feels’?

      Thanks!

      • Dave Asprey

        Eating more definitely helps performance on low sleep nights!

  • Kent Ross

    Dave – you mention that you had sushi for dinner. Is that with or without rice? If with, brown or white? What’s your take on eating a bit of rice as long as you have plenty of fish with it?

  • Dave Asprey

    @Kent – I had white rice, but tossed half of it from under the nigiri. The food lacking in sushi is fat, so I dip it in MCT oil, which does fantastic things for sushi’s flavor. The MCT I use has no flavor, so it brings out the taste of the sushi in an amazing way. Balancing the carbs from rice with MCT is more important than balancing it with extra fish, but I do both. J I also block the mercury from the fish…but that’s another post. <o:p></o:p>

  • ArmiLegge

    Great to see another paleo diet biohacker out there who doesn’t rely on the whole “caveman did it” mantra:)While in general I completely agree about excess carbohydrates, I do think quality matters more than quantity, even here. A ton of carrots and broccoli is obviously not the same as Cheerios and PopTarts, and people like the Katavins have been eating a fairly high amount of carbohydrate and living just fine. They get all of their carbs from tubers and leafy greens, with almost no fruit, and there is even some research showing that the carbs are first converted into MCT’s, and then burned as fuel.LDL is actually still a pretty poor metric. While its still nice to know, there are both “small dense” LDL and “big puffy” LDL. Sorry for the lame terminology, but the “big puffy” ones are the ones that have been show to be slightly atherosclerotic. I’m really glad you focused so much on the role hormones play in all of this. They really are the deciding factor in most health indicators and results:)Thanks for the excellent work man!

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  • Evan Granowitz

    Dave, I have a few questions (my posts were somehow erased when the website was reformatted):

    1. What do you do when you are traveling to follow the diet?? How do you go out to a restaurant to eat?

    2. You list Chocolate as something that we can eat. Could you please elaborate on what type of chocolate is good to eat?? Also, should the quantity of chocolate consumption be kept to a minimum?

    3. Is Himalayan pink salt the equivalent of sea salt?

    4. How do you “block the mercury from the fish” as you referenced in you May 25th, 2011 at 3:57 pm post?

    Thanks,

    Evan Granowitz

  • Michael

    Great site Dave!

    But, I have one question. Is it more cost effective to go for the High-Performance Protein powder or the Collagen Powder? As with High-Performance you get the whole shebang with Collagen too, whilst Collagen is just by itself.

    What for you personally gave the most benefits? And is it ‘overkill’ to take both?

    btw, Bulletproof coffee is fantastic! (As if you didn’t already know.. haha)

    • Dave Asprey

      @Michael, that’s a good question. If you want a convenient meal-replacement/supplement type powder that tastes good and has enough fat to get you going, along with immune-stimulating lactoferrin or colostrum, the coconut collagen is the way to go.

      But if you want to take some protein that does not require digestion on waking or before bed, straight collagen is the way to go.

      Me? I do collagen on empty stomach before bed, and many mornings blend coco-collagen with raw eggs and ice and xylitol and MCT oil for an awesome breakfast. Either that, or straight bulletproof coffee breakfast! :)

  • Evan Granowitz

    Dave, where does glucose fall in the spectrum for sweeteners and sugars?

    • Dave Asprey

      @Evan, glucose is the same as dextrose (except dextrose is from corn). It tastes great and makes your brain work well. Much better than sucrose (which is 1 glucose + 1 fructose) or fructose (which is evil) but dextrose still feeds yeast and drives insulin. I use xylitol for taste, or dextrose as a performance enhancer.

    • Dave Asprey

      Pretty good, especially for mental energy! Bad for daily use over long term. Use it like caffeine for performance.

  • Evan Granowitz

    Dave: What do you think about ice cream made with raw milk (or raw whipping cream/half and half), xylitol and organic vanilla extract?? Is there a limit on how much of the xylitol one should eat even though it is on the eat side of the spectrum??

    Thanks,

    Evan

    P.S. I am still waiting to hear what you have to say regarding my questions in my June 16th comment above. I hope you will have time to respond soon.

    • Dave Asprey

      Love it. Xylitol is anti-ketogenic slightly, has calories, but does not raise insulin. Useful stuff. Upper limit depends on your GI tolerance, which will increase over time.

  • Evan Granowitz

    Dave: What question were you responding to in your June 28, 2011 response at 8:23 am, which stated: “Pretty good, especially for mental energy! Bad for daily use over long term. Use it like caffeine for performance”?

    • Dave Asprey

      Evan, in the June 28 8:23am post, I was talking about 5 hour energy drinks. Darn threaded replies aren’t working on WordPress. :(

  • Evan Granowitz

    Dave: What do you do when you are traveling to follow the diet?? How do you go out to a restaurant to eat?

  • Evan Granowitz

    Dave: You list Chocolate as something that we can eat. I found where you said that you like Lindt 90% cocoa bars. Should the quantity of chocolate consumption be kept to a minimum (or is there a recommended limit)since 10% of the bar is other ingredients?? Also, are bars with less than 90% cocoa ok to eat (such as Lindt 75% or 60%)? and is there a limit suggested for these??

    • Dave Asprey

      Evan, If you find mold-free chocolate, I haven’t found a limit, although most people will feel the caffeine, theobromine, and other neuroactive chemicals after some dose. For me, it’s 2 full size Lindt bars per day, if they’re very clean (it varies by batch). The other 10% is sugar and emulsifier; it’s not going to have much effect on you in a 90%. I wouldn’t go below 75%, and even that is pretty sweet. Chocolate is a very personal thing – some people love the chemicals in it, some don’t do well on high doses. Aside from those, the fat in chocolate is a health food, so a high chocolate % bar is a high healthy fat bar!

  • Evan Granowitz

    Dave: Is Himalayan pink salt the equivalent of sea salt?

  • Evan Granowitz

    Dave: How do you “block the mercury from the fish” as you referenced in you May 25th, 2011 at 3:57 pm post? I love sushi, especially tuna. I also like swordfish and sea bass, but I am worried about the mercury…

    Thanks,

    Evan

    • Dave Asprey

      Evan, I use chlorella to adsorb the mercury in my gut so my brain and liver don’t have to!

      And Himilayan pink salt is the nutritional equivalent of sea salt, yes. But it’s actually better than sea salt because it has no pollutants in it. I use himilayan most of the time, or some very good local salt made on Vancouver Island where I live.

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  • Sherri vaters

    I find it odd that Cayanne doesn’t hold a place in your spices recommendation as it is very effective at removing toxins from your body.

    • Dave Asprey

      The capsaicin in cayanne and hot peppers is quite good for you because if the way it lowers substance P, the primordial pain sensing chemical in he body. Even snails have it.

      However, most cayenne commercially available as a spice is heavily contaminated with mold from the drying and storage process, making it a strong source of mycotoxins which get in the way of cognitive and physical regeneration!

  • Kellyjam

    Why pasteurized eggs as opposed to pastured organic fed free range eggs that I get from my local organic farm?

    • Dave Asprey

      Autocorrect is an evil thing. A new version will be posted within a day with the correction and several other updates. Thanks for letting me know!

  • http://www.forbiddenhealingforum.com Capt. Randall

    Please turn that Bulletproof food graphic into a poster and distribute it to physicians, health food stores, farmers markets and sell it over the net.

    • Dave Asprey

      Capt. Randall, I can do one better for you! Sign up for the newsletter, and the poster arrives via .pdf in your inbox! :)

  • http://www.nearerstillnearer.squarespace.com Lola

    This is Awesome! This is pretty much the diet I follow except I feel better on no grains at all. Thanks for this, I’ll share this with my friends and family!

    • Dave Asprey

      @Lola, thank you for letting me know. It’s so gratifying to hear that all the work that goes in to this site is helping people. That’s why it’s here. :)

  • Sean

    Pretty impressive diet. I would recommend you look into kefir regarding the probiotics, as kefir you make at home has more probiotics than any other product I believe. Cheap to make, just find some kefir grains and put them in milk and after 24 hours they will be “done.”

    Better than any probiotic supplement and cheaper.

    • Dave Asprey

      Thanks Sean for the thoughts on kefir. After years of trying various probiotic concoctions, including kefir, I’ve come to believe that having a carefully controlled laboratory-grade strain-specific form of probiotic is most important. SIBO – small intestine bacterial overgrowth – is more common that most people realize, and kefir won’t fix that. There is also the dairy problem, in that you’re still eating cooked dairy, which is not a good thing. A new post on probiotics is coming up!

      • http://zze.st Maxim

        Hey, Dave! What’s your best choice of probiotics brand? Thanks a lot!

  • http://jonbarron don

    Great read. First time learning about the bullet proof diet. Graphs are very helpful. Any modifications in your regime for those of us with type 2 diabetes ?

    • Dave Asprey

      @don – eating this way helps to restore cell membrane flexibility so insulin receptors can function better. Xylitol is your friend. I was categorized as “pre-diabetic” when I was 28. I’m 38 and now my anti-aging doctor classifies me as “zero risk.” He’s at http://www.antiaging.com and is well known in his field.

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  • http://beachreadybody.com Jamie

    Dave , nice site you have here. great information backing up the fact that a calorie is not a calorie. What we eat can drastically alter the bodies response. I am on a slow-carb lifestyle and feel great. I’ll tell my readers at to check out your site. Cheers! Jamie

  • Kellyjam

    Whoops sorry about the dopey egg question. I thought the chart had pasteurized when in fact is says pastured. I better start this diet soon lol.

  • Denver

    Awesome info Dave, after tweaking my diet i am almost 100% bulletproof and have noticed a massive difference in energy levels and are leaner and lighter than i have been for 13 years, thanks for that. Couple of questions, my partner is struggling breaking old eating habits and wanted to know weather its an all or nothing diet, will following it 70 percent with the huge increase in good fats especially the butter still be a good thing? Will the diet be sensible for our two year old son?

    • Dave Asprey

      Denver, thanks for the feedback! Just adding GF butter to an otherwise suboptimal diet will make a big difference. Following the BP diet 70% will go a very long way! Restricting wheat and cheese and milk is particularly important, as is cutting sugar and starch.

      We used a very similar version of the diet for my wife Lana to get pregnant after age 40 – twice – and it’s one of the pillars of our upcoming Better Baby Book
      Both our kids (2 and 4) are 100% bulletproof and can’t get enough grass fed beef, lamb, and butter. In fact, the first thing my oldest ever asked Santa for was her own stick of grass-fed salted butter. (she got it and took a bite out of it like a candy bar). The results are amazing – bone density like you’ve never seen. They literally weigh more for their heights than you’d expect given their height and weight. A lifelong teacher of young kids who’s now in her 70′s picked up my son when he was 1 year old. She exclaimed, “Wow, he feels like a baby from 40 years ago. The newer ones are so much lighter than they used to be.”

      So make your kids bulletproof and give them the gift of lifelong health by letting them build their bodies and genes using the best fuel available. It’s what I’m doing for my kids!

  • Caiterin

    This whole diet looks extremely tempting– I did the Blood Type diet in high school (type O, so somewhat similar to this), and that was the only time I ever lost weight, despite playing sports and working out. I’m just concerned with the cost of organic food. As a college student, I have to worry about feeding myself on as little money as I can manage. How harmful would it be to follow the Bulletproof Diet with nonorganic vegetables and non grass fed beef? Ideally I would stick to the healthier stuff, but don’t have the resources to do it.

    • Dave Asprey

      Caiterin, this diet is cheaper than you think. A pound of grass fed butter is good for 2 days, and costs $3. Grass fed beef (follow my affiliate link please!) is about $6/lb if you buy 25lbs to throw in the freezer. Eggs (even non organic are ok, just avoid omega 3 eggs) are $3. Skip the organic vegies for now, that’s fine. But you need to eat grass fed or it won’t work. Non-grass fed has too many toxins. If you MUST eat non-grass fed, eat the leanest you can find and cover it in grass fed butter or coconut oil, and take a charcoal capsule with it. You can eat a half lb of butter, a half dozen eggs, and a half pound of meat every day for $6.

      • http://twitter.com/RadiantLux RadiantLux

        I live in the Chicago suburbs with access to great organic and bio-dynamic farmers. I can get a pound of raw, grass-fed butter from my farmers for $14. A quart of cream is $13.25 and I have to make the butter myself. Grass-fed hamburger is $4-5/pound. Pastured eggs are $4-5/dozen. If I find a chicken hobbyist, I can get eggs for $3/dozen but it is not a consistent supply. One day of the diet you mention would cost me around $13-14.

        My family consists of 2 adults and 3 children, so my food bill is high. I want to feed them as clean as possible. This means we don’t eat steak too often. ($12/pound!) Sometimes I buy a round steak and make jerky. I disappears quickly! Stew meat and roasts take longer to cook but they are cheaper per pound. We do eat pastured chicken. I save the bones and make broth. According to the Weston A Price Foundation, bone broth is an incredibly healthy traditional food. Your optimal cookingadvice may not take into account that some meats need low and slow braising in order to be delicious.

        I’m curious what have you discovered in your research about stews, roasts and broth.

  • Julie

    Alas, Traveler’s Friend has been discontinued. Does anyone know why?

    “Sorry, this item has been discontinued. Please choose from the featured items on the right.”

    • Dave Asprey

      Julie, probably because of bad marketing. It was just 2x strength GSE anyway. :)

  • Maher

    Dave, I must have missed it…but coult you re-post the link for buying grass fed meat? Thanks.

  • Maher

    Thanks Andrew.

  • Evan Granowitz

    Dave, what brand chlorella do you use/recommend for mercury absorption?? How much of it do you (should one) take?

    • http://www.facebook.com/asprey.net Dave Asprey

      I am not partial to any one brand, as long as it’s fractured cell wall, it seems to be ok. I take “a handful” which is probably 40-50 tiny tablets.

  • Brent Frazier

    Great work on the chart, I am sharing it with everyone I know. I would like to know where Turbinado or “sugar in the raw” would be one the sugar chart. I use Stevia and Xylitol occasionally, but prefer sugar in the raw.
    Thanks
    Brent

    • http://www.facebook.com/asprey.net Dave Asprey

      Sadly, sugar in the raw and turbinado are simply the same as white sugar from a nutritional perspective. They feed yeast and in the case of unfiltered sugar, may even contain yeast. Sorry!

      And thanks for sharing the diet! I’m so glad to hear the amazing stories coming back from people who are using it.

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  • Kira

    Hi Dave, I am also very intrigued by your chlorella strategy…as far as I know it should be taken on an empty stomach to be effective…so do you personally take it with fish meals? Would be great to eat all the salmon without the mercury consequences:-)

    And one more question if you don’t mind: I am probably addicted to fruits in my fatty smoothies, grapefruits and berries in particular…I probably have 2 large grapefruits and a cup of berries during each day. Not trying to loose weight. Would you say that much of “evil” fructose would negate my otherwise good diet?
    Thnx!

    • http://www.facebook.com/asprey.net Dave Asprey

      It pulls mercury from your tissues on an empty stomach, or binds to mercury in fish if taken with fish. Or you could just eat sockeye salmon which is virtually mercury free.

      You want less than 15 grams of fructose a day, so you are probably over that, depending on what kind of berries. Also, grapefruit reduce your ability to excrete toxins. They’re ok to eat, but not 2 times a day every day. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-468559/Eating-grapefruit-increase-breast-cancer-risk-third.html

      • ysabel

        I love grapefruit but I was troubled when I read your reply..the link you’ve given above is dated 2007 and here’s what I found after being scared of the link you’ve given..
        http://www.healthkey.com/health/diseases-illnesses/breast-cancer/hk-dr.gourmet-grapefruit-breast-cancer,0,1727923.story

        • Dave Asprey

          Sorry to worry you, but you should still be worried if you want to eat it every day. Here’s the problem: grapefruit slows P450 liver mechanisms. Cytochrome P450 is a group of enzymes. Cytochrome P450 is on the inner membrane of the mitochondria of liver cells. Mitochondria are the powerplants of cells that store oxygen to fuel the cell.

          The function of most CYP enzymes is to catalyze the oxidation of organic substances. The substrates of CYP enzymes include metabolic intermediates such as lipids and steroidal hormones, as well as xenobiotic substances such as drugs and other toxic chemicals. CYPs are the major enzymes involved in drug metabolism and bioactivation, accounting for ~75% of the total number of different metabolic reactions.

          Ok, so what the breast study found was that people on toxic fake hormone replacement couldn’t detox them, so got breast cancer more often. You may assume that, since you aren’t on those drugs, you’re safe. But that’s missing the point. Are you exposed to other toxins? Of course you are. And your liver must detox them. If you inhibit P450 by eating grapefruit every day, whatever toxins you’re exposed to won’t be as easy to oxidize and excrete. They’ll build up. Your odds of getting sick go up.

          What do I do? I eat grapefruit occasionally because it is good. I also take liposomal glutathione most days to keep my liver humming along at high performance levels (glutathione is the main enzyme needed to detox stuff in the liver, and liposomal makes it possible to pass the GI tract.)

          Sorry to burst your grapefruit scented bubble!

      • Andrew Reece

        Just so you know, and I’m not doubting your information per se, in the UK at least, the Daily Mail is very poorly regarded, touted as purely sensationalist. It makes seemingly random accusations about what is bad for you, often only to come back a few weeks later saying that the same thing is now good for you (in the same way). I’m not going to say they’re definitely wrong, but in general they don’t seem to be the most reliable source for information.

        • Dave Asprey

          Point taken! I’d forgotten that from my days working in Cambridge at a startup. :)

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  • http://twitter.com/herbkim Herb Kim

    Dave, peanuts are bad? Say it isn’t so! :-o

    • Dave Asprey

      Sad but true, as Metallica puts it. Peanuts are indeed quite bad for you, from a cancer and a nutrition perspective. Almond butter is also mold prone, but much healthier.

  • Anklefootmd

    Thank you for putting this together and making a gradient. Knowing which of the things not to have that we all cheat with is good. Cheating can be done in the middle of the page rather than on the right hand side.
    However, Onion, Garlic, Pepper are way to far to the right. Even Cinnamon is too far to the right.
    Putting the sugar alcohols on the left is also incorrect. These substances act 2/3 the same as sugar and are poorly absorbed, travel to the lower intestine, increase abnormal gut flora and GAS. I can’t imagine why Xylitol would make it along side Stevia.

    • Ben

      I can’t use Xylitol, it causes me serious gastric distress. I use eryithritol with no effects.

      • atom1cs

        I have been using Stevia (organic) with zero issues, love it so far, and won’t ever go back to synthetic chemicals again.

        • Chloe Blue

          Me too and I’m careful to get the concentrated powder (or liquid) which has no fillers like maltodextrin. I like NuNaturals and the Kal brand.

    • http://www.facebook.com/monica.s.lewis Monica Stewart Lewis

      Talapia is too far to the left. “While a portion of tilapia has 135 milligrams of omega-3 fatty acids, a portion of salmon has over 2,000 milligrams,” the Times
      reports. “And farmed tilapia may have even less than wild tilapia
      because fish acquire omega-3s by eating aquatic plants and other fish.”
      Farmed fish, by contrast, largely eat feed made from corn and soy.

      Read more: http://www.rd.com/health/healthy-eating/is-tilapia-bad-for-you/#ixzz2Qe7dDiDy

      • Rdd TheStrong

        Could it be because salmon would have more mercury than tilapia?
        See gotmercury.org

      • Candace Lee

        farm-raised fish or seafood are not recommended from what I have read here

      • PePPer

        Farmed Tilapia eats farmed salmon poo… I saw it on Discover Ch. on Dirty Jobs… ( Salmon eats the soy and corn). Never touched Tilapia after that!

        • Zorica Vuletic

          I don’t care what eats what…I can’t manage much fish these days due to pretty bad poisoning I induced upon myself from eating [bad] Chinese sourced seafood (from frozen) for 4-5 months continuously. :s In fact today a friend of mind offered some fish (non-Chinese) in a package (white of some sort)…I felt a bit queasy just thinking about it. LOL OI OI OI I can eat fresh salmon or lake caught fish (or Caribbean fresh seafood) etc. but not just regular store seafood. I’m a bit sad I created a food aversion for myself. I’m sure it will pass, but I suspect not for many many years, and possibly…it could be for life…who knows. :P

    • alexschindler

      I can’t imagine why stevia would make it anywhere, but xylitol is a) half as calorically dense as sugar. per g, your body utilizes it for two calories. the rest survives the small intestines intact and feeds colon bacteria much like soluble fiber, allowing them to produce healthy short-chain fatty acids (specifically butyric acid) and ensuring colon health.
      b) extremely good for your oral health. it kills cariogenic bacteria like streptococcus mutans, which are unable to metabolize it but which do take in its five-carbon ‘sugar-like’ structure (it is a pentitol) and are thereby produced from either reproducing through mitosis or ‘clinging’ and forming biofilm. this makes plaque less sticky.

      since oral health has been linked to numerous systemic health issues– some research even justifies the conclusion that gum disease is usually a necessary condition for endocarditis– xylitol is just about the only sweetener that does belong on the “green” side of a spectrum. erythritol, too, but its expensive as balls.

      • Candace Lee

        What is wrong with stevia???

  • Zingbo

    AHEM. you say below – “Coming soon: Ice cream that boosts hormone levels enough that if you share it with your significant other, you can pretty much bet on “getting some…” Do share…

    • Dave Asprey

      Sometimes, I’m lazy…the recipe is sitting in front of me, but it’s based on grams from my digital scale, and I know if I post it, I’ll spend all kinds of time figuring out the weight to volume numbers for butter, xylitol, coconut, etc. I will find an hour and write it up soon!

      • Resonner

        so … about that ice cream?

        (you mentioned this at burningman too!)

        sounds more like “tease some” ice cream :)

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  • http://twitter.com/ArtGow Art Gow

    How do you feel about the Cronise via Ferris recommendation of cold exposure to increase fat loss. The Truer, The Fewer…

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  • Andrew Reece

    As someone who is fairly soon to become a student (as opposed to living at home at the moment), I was wondering if you have any tips on the most cost effective way to get the most out of the diet. I live and will be studying in the UK if that has any relevance.

    • Dave Asprey

      More grass fed butter! Cheapest calories per dollar, along with eggs.

      • Andrew Reece

        From watching your presentation on mycotoxins it looks as though it’s going to be hard to avoid them on a low budget… ironic that as a student it’s difficult not to eat in a way that slows your brain…

  • Andrew Reece

    Sorry, another question – do you have any advice on what to do when, for instance, asked out for a meal by friends? How can one stay sociable yet bulletproof in such a situation?

    • Dave Asprey

      Order vegetables drenched in butter, with lightly cooked fish (wild if possible). Make sure the butter is not margarine. Or order poached eggs, soft.

      I travel 2-3 days a week for my day job where I spend all my working hours (and then some). I carry flat packs of smoked sockeye salmon from Whole Foods, along with a stick or two of Kerry Gold butter. Salmon and avocados are ok on airplanes, and you can fit a stick of butter in your checked luggage, or half one in a soap container made for travel.

  • Shawn

    Hi Dave – I just stumbled on your blog and must say I am blown away. I signed up and got your welcome emails. One question I have – is there a secret handshake I must learn to get the 2.0 pdf mentioned? The link sent in the email is titled v1.1 – or does the .1 actually mean 2? hehe

    • Dave Asprey

      The secret handshake involves butter. :)

      Thanks for pointing it out! The .1 revision to the diet is indeed the same as the 2.0 we reference. Apologies – apparently I need a better code management system.

  • Kathy

    I didn’t see this issue addressed in the comments, but I apologize if it’s redundant. Can you explain why pasteurized dairy is to be avoided? One other question I have is the distinction between simple and complex carbohydrates…I see this discussed a lot in defense of certain carbohydrates. What is your take? Thanks!

  • http://twitter.com/ArtGow Art Gow

    For what its worth, a wise course of action for people wanting to go down the “Bulletproof Path” is starting with Bulletproof Coffee… have it for breakfast and another cup when you get hungry again… experiment with different amounts of butter… Once you know how you feel from that, test foods at your next meal… if you maintain that level of clarity, energy, mental stamina, and “bulletproof-ness”, you know that is a food you can add… do it again and again until you have a “Bulletproof Smorgasbord” throughout the day… test, tweak, test, tweak, and repeat… but Bulletproof Coffee is the foundation to build on… Dave, et al, if I am wrong, feel free to correct or delete… thanks!

    • Ryan

      I believe that grass-fed butter is the foundation for the Bulletproof Diet as it is mentioned the most and is the most highly recommended by Dave for its caloric density/price and taste.

      • Dave Asprey

        GF butter is important, but combining it with MCT oil, raw (or runny) egg yolks, and grass-fed meat is important. Those are cornerstones!

    • Dave Asprey

      There’s no doubt that bulletproof coffee is an awesome way to start the day, but you can do it with tea, or chai, or just tossing some butter into your smoothie (blend before you add the ice). I honestly think a 100% fat breakfast is the best way to go!

    • Dave Asprey

      There’s no doubt that bulletproof coffee is an awesome way to start the day, but you can do it with tea, or chai, or just tossing some butter into your smoothie (blend before you add the ice). I honestly think a 100% fat breakfast is the best way to go!

  • Ryan

    Dave, what kind of bulletproof drinks do you recommend?

    • Dave Asprey

      Water, green tea, and bulletproof coffee. If you’re looking for alcohol, there’s a blog post prioritizing alcohol types!

      • http://www.facebook.com/mony.chhim Mony Chhim

        Dave, which kind of water do you recommend and what is the best packaging?
        And what do you think about Brita-filtered water?

        • Ender Wiggin

          I’d recommend ZeroWater-filtered water.

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  • JoeCancun

    Hi Dave, is there any preferable cut of grass fed meat you recommend? Is ground beef ok? burgers? I’m mexican so I love tongue, liver, bone marrow… if it’s organic and grass fed.. Is it bulletproof?

    • http://armilegge.com Armistead Legge

      Hey Joe, you’ll definetely have to read the new series we have on grass-fed meat coming out this week:) In the mean time…

      If you are eating grass-fed AND grass-finished meat, you’re golden. Try to eat beef, lamb, and bison for the majority of your intake. US Wellness meats has the best stuff online:

      http://www.upgradedself.com/Bulletproof-Body/Grass-fed-Beef-Lamb/flypage.tpl.html

      Ground beef is fine. Burgers are fine too.

      Organ meats are just as good, and in some ways better than regular meats.

      Bone marrow and liver are possibly the two best foods on earth. Go nuts :D

      Hope that helps!

      -Armi

    • Dave Asprey

      Joe, pretty much any cut of grass fed is good, the fattier the better. I eat a lot of ground for convenience, but blade steak (carne ranchero) is one of my favorites. You can go nuts on the tongue and liver (way too much liver can cause vitamin A toxicity though). Marrow is good for you, but it needs to be cooked at a low temperature or you’ll damage the fats in it.

      • Anonymous

        Make sure you get enough sun exposure and eat foods that contain D (salmon is a really good source) and vitamin A toxicity won’t be as much of a concern. Liver is such an important source of b vitamins (it’s the best source of folate, for instance) and choline (which prevents fatty liver disease in people) that if someone enjoys eating it, I’d wholeheartedly encourage them to continue.

      • Sean

        Dave, is ~150 too hot for marrow? I’ve been submerging marrow bones and skirt steak in minimal water in a enameled iron pot, cooking at ~150 till the meat is done. A tasty, quick meal, using uswellnessmeats products. The leftover juice is delicious too.

  • Alenfaljic

    Hey everybody.
    I just lost a lot of weight (too much) so I need to gain 20+ pounds to get to my normal weight. (1) Do I have to add some carbs to my diet so that muscles will be able to grow and develop? Or are healthy fats, animal proteins and vegetables all I need?
    (2) How can I calculate caloric intake for gaining weight?
    (3) Has anyone tried to get such weight with bulletproof diet?

    • http://armilegge.com Armistead Legge

      Hey man,

      I can absolutely relate. I lost a ton of weight with an eating disorder, and eating like this (I hadn’t found the BPD yet, but I developed my own version of paleo before I even knew it was technically a “diet”) was what allowed me to recover and put on lean mass. This diet is perfect for gaining muscle.

      More recently, I added 12 pounds of lean mass while doing high intensity endurance training almost 30 hours a week for triathlons. Many people say it’s impossible to gain that much mass while doing that much endurance training – not unless you eat Bulletproof. Also, it was not fat, I’ve got a more defined six pack and *almost* an 8 pack.

      You do not need a lot of carbs. 10-20 percent of calories from veggies is fine.

      Some things that are especially important:

      1) High saturated fat intake. This increases free testosterone which will help with mass gain.

      2) High(er) protein intake. 20% will probably be enough, but there’s nothing wrong with increasing protein to 30% to gain mass.

      3) Weights are recommended, but not essential. I still think there are a ton of benefits to weight training and it would be a great idea.

      4) Consider intermittent fasting. This helps nutrient partitioning and will make more calories go to muscle instead of fat.

      5) sleep more. Sleep is needed for lean mass gain. Don’t do a bunch of sleep hacking while gaining mass.

      6) MCT oil can be a great way to add calories while gaining mass. It converts almost immediately into fuel, leaving no energy for fat accumulation. I’ll be writing a lot about this soon.
      Here’s a link to the best source:
      http://www.upgradedself.com/Food-Upgrades/MCT-Oil/flypage.tpl.html

      As for your second question, it completely depends on the individual. I would need to know your height, weight, activity level, current caloric intake, and current dietary patterns. You can email me at [email protected] and I promise I’ll get back to you.

      Let me know if you have any more questions :)

      -Armi

      • JoeCancun

        I’ve had this issue and gaining has been a very frustrating experience.

        Armi can you please elaborate a bit more on the intermittent fasting? How long do you do it? Any particulars you can describe?

        • http://armilegge.com Armistead Legge

          Hey Joe,

          We’re going to write some articles on IF soon, but until then, here’s an article I wrote on the subject:

          http://www.armilegge.com/super-basic-starters-guide-intermittent-fasting

          I usually fast for about 16-18 hours, and eat for about 6-8 hours. You can do this for as long as you want. I think I’ll do it for the rest of my life. I don’t have to stop to eat all morning! For most people, it might look something like this:

          6:00 AM Wake up

          12:00 PM First meal
          4:00 PM 2nd Meal
          7:30 PM 3rd meal

          If you don’t feel food during the fast, take some MCT oil or drink some BP Coffee. Let me know if you have any more questions.

          -Armi

    • Mryan4775

      If you are trying to gain some muscle mass adding in some non-grain carbs from starches(yams, sweet potatoes, taro, plantains, et) post workout will help with protein synthesis via insulin will help. Just watch your level of definition and throttle your carb consumption when you start to flatten out. As evil as many make out insulin to be it is necessary for OPTIMAL muscle gain and as long as you have a normal metabolism(i.e. normal bllod glucose, insulin sensitivity) you should be good

      • http://armilegge.com Armistead Legge

        Well said.

  • Karamba

    Great web site! Tons of useful info!

    I have 2 questions about the diet:

    1) I am genetically predisposed to baldness (alopecia) and acne. That is why am very concerned that the high amounts of saturated fat will worsen my condition due to increased levels of free testosterone. The acne part is easy to figure out as the impact will be within several days, however, the alopecia is much more difficult to figure out how it will be influenced by this diet. Any users with similar issues?

    2) My wife had her gal bladder removed and I am afraid that such diet will be bad for her due to the high amounts of saturated fat.

    Any input will be highly appreciated

  • Karamba

    Hi Dave and all,

    Great site with amazing info. Keep up the good work!

    I have 2 questions related to the diet:

    1 I am predisposed to baldness (alopecia) and have sensitive skin (acne). I am concerned that the high amounts of saturated fat will increase my Free testosterone levels and this will negatively affect my conditions. The skin part is easy to test and observe, but the effects on baldness are almost impossible to determine for several months. Does anyone have any experience or educated opinions?

    2 My wife has a removed gal bladder. Would the high amounts of saturated fat be dangerous for that?

    Cheers

    • Vic

      Just do steroids like dave does and you will lose weight, rofl. So hilarious that a dude on steroids is telling people to micromanage irrelevant bs like fungal infections in order to get lean… even more hilarious that people buy into it. Go on pubmed and look up studies by bhasim… steroids alone (without exercise or diet changes) are way more effective at body recomp than lifting weights and dieting. Inject testosterone like dave does and thats the real key to being bulletproof.

      • JoeCancun

        Vic: Would you please elaborate? I am no expert, and since this is a forum your expertise and full comments will be welcomed. And Vic, I am following Dave’s advise and I am feeling better, so if you could direct us to your investigations that would be really awesome. I am a full time salesman, so when I hear a guy like Dave talk and know that he’s sincere and never comes across like a know it all and explains that he’s an experimenter, I follow. I would rather follow a sincere guy looking for the answers than a guy that thinks he has them all. So, Vic,it would really be constructive to help us out.

      • Dave Asprey

        Vic, did you really look at the blog? I have never injected any steriod except once when I was 16, when they injected prednisone (a corticosteriod) to get inflammation in my tonsils down.

        I do use a topical, bioidentical testosterone cream, 10% strength in a lipopen base, 1/4 tsp every other day, to keep my testosterone levels at normal for a person who is about 30. I’ve cut my dose in half in the last 5 years as I perfected the Bulletproof Diet. So I’m on an carefully measured replacement dose of testosterone that does not give my diet an unfair advantage. This is a very normal anti-aging dose, and one appropriate given that I was obese for a very long time and have naturally low testo production as a result.

      • Dylan_ansems

        Saw Dave on Australian television promoting some drug to improve mental performance!
        Tried BP for 2 weeks, butter coffee (organic fresh ground single origin beans) MCT oil, grass fed beef with little greens, some eggs for lunch, put on 6 kilos! Must have been forgetting to inject the testosterone!!!
        Was very hopeful this would work, but seems like a unch of absolute BS, agree with the coconut oils etc, but not butter or meat all day, that is just Atkins all over again?

        • Zorica

          I’m looking to trying Raw from grass fed Bovine colostrum. Has many growth factors as well as immune boosting enzymes. Hoping this will help with leaky gut.

          As for steroids, I don’t see a problem taking them when monitored closely by experienced professional. When I reach a certain age, I will have to look into this myself, but for now under 30, I want to rely more on my own body…

          I like BP diet, but I also incorporate many theories from Jack Kruse. I will reserve BP style coffee (still drink plain coffee etc.) for hard winter exposure. The amount of cold I plan to subject myself to this winter will definitely require heavy butter consumption. Summer I feel like is more better for coconut oil, MUFA’s, etc.

    • Laurel

      Karamba

      Acne is one part “clogged pores” and another part “inflammation.” You might be having a mild reaction to a food protein.

      I accidentally discovered that I was reacting to milk- not the casein, but the lactalbumin and lactoglobulin in the whey. Eating these proteins would cause inflammation to show up on my skin, including large welts on my scalp and behind my ears.

      So, I avoid milk, yogurt, cottage cheese, and whey powder. Cheese, butter and cream are OK. (Yay!)

      I have no acne now. But if I slip up, I’ll pay for it with a pimple or two.

      You could start here with your experiments.

      -Laurel

    • Jay

      Alopecia can be caused by too much iron. Lots of steak (washed down with red wine) exacerbated the problem. Try checking your levels and if they’re high you can donate blood to lower them. Easier than giving up steak.

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  • Lamakofka

    I have been doing the bulletproof diet for 3 weeks and prior to that been doing paleo at about 80% strictness. My diet seems to breakdown to about 60% fat from grass fed butter, and coconut oil, 15-20% carbs from veggies, and 15-20% from grass fed meat. I am desperately trying to lose about 10 pounds and have not lost any weight since becoming “bulletproof” I am wondering if anybody has any suggestions. The only thing I will occassionally cheat with is maybe 2tsp of sugar in my coffee the odd morning, otherwise I have been very clean???? Not sure if i need to try something else

  • http://www.ebrainsupplements.com David

    Interesting guidelines, will be putting these to the test thoroughly! One question though, why would a whey protein concentrate be healther/’better’ than an isolate?

    Cheers

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  • Zak

    Dave,

    Are slow cookers bulletproof? If i understand correctly they cook low and slow… we like low right?

    also the comments are starting to become un-manageable, is there a forum I don’t know about?

  • Jedthejokerexodus

    Hey Dave, your diet looks excellent, simple and cheap…Organic, grass-fed Meat, Fat and Veg. I would like to try this and am fine with eating 20% of good meat or fish and 50% of fat but I have no idea how to get this. Do I get this from butter? Do I put the butter on something or do I just at it from a spoon? I ask as this is clearly the easiest way to get 50% of calories from a fat source.
    Thanks.

  • JoeCancun

    Hi Guys: I’ve been trying to follow the diet but it has been trickier than I thought buying all the things down here in Mexico. (Cancún). Everything is either super expensive or non existent. (No grass fed meat! only butter)

    Anyway, I have a lot of questions…

    a) Is home made mayonnaise OK?
    b) You mention that eggs should be pastured, but in post reply you say it may be OK to use farm eggs. Is this correct? Is there a limit to this?
    c)I know the answer to this one but I have to ask, is Hershey’s Cocoa ok?
    d) Regarding probiotics… what about water Kefir? Have you looked into that? Since it has sugar from alcohol could that be OK?
    e) Strangely enough, while experimenting with this diet a good friend of mine and my personal Dr., basically agreed with everything you say about the diet. But we just found out that I have absorption issues due to a malformation of my lower intestine. (because I was loosing to much weight, so did the tests and this is how we found out)

    So it was her that suggested that I supplement with Molasses for nutrition. It’s not in the chart, so I have to ask. Any limit or pointers?
    f)I have lost a ton of weight from my belly but also muscle, this due to my absorption issues. I am a very skinny guy with a Speedy Gonzalez’ tummy, so I’m happy that my stomach looks better but I just hate it that I look too skinny.

    Any pointers on how to gain weight?
    I realize now that my tummy was way bigger than it’s supposed to now I know it was because I ate not enough oil and too many fruits, way too many.

    I have access to wild fish (salmon and similar), very limited pastured eggs, all oils except yours. ( no MCT oil).

    Thank you very much and I apologize for the rant but this is not my mother language!!

    ON the bright side, and I hope you can use my mail for your publisher.
    I would absolutely buy your book, I have basically read all your blog, everything.

    Keep up the good work and thank you very much for sharing your work it’s just amazing.

  • http://twitter.com/murphtim Tim Murphy

    Dave, where would pumpkin fall on the bulletproof diet?

    • http://armilegge.com Armistead Legge

      Awesome question Tim, especially since I just bought a car full of them :) They’re like squash. Good if you need some carbs. They’re also lower in fructose and taste amazing!

      • http://twitter.com/murphtim Tim Murphy

        Awesome, thanks Armi! October always puts me in the mood for my pumpkin protein shakes. They’re kind of addicting!

        • http://armilegge.com Armistead Legge

          I love pumpkin for carb re-feeds. I wash them, cut them in half, bake them – and eat :)

          Yes – Very addicting :D

  • Justin M

    I, personally do not think this is an ideal diet strictly from a body composition perspective. I think it will work fine for a beginner or someone trying to cut (although I’d increase the protein), but not for someone relatively advanced trying to bulk. I’m 220lbs@8% (but tall) and I’ve tried every diet there is, but have never had success with low-carb bulking. Bulking with carbs this low will probably not permit you to gain much muscle. Also, as far as sugars go, I eat ridiculous amounts of sugar post-workout (well, waxy maize) and it does not cause me to gain fat at all. This all in mind, it is possible that this diet is optimal for anti-aging, functioning on low sleep, and/or consistent mental alertness. My diet is much more cyclical, which results in insulin and energy spikes. The result is that I have energy for my workout, but perhaps less energy during the day. The bottom line is that I think there are trade-offs. This, however, is almost exactly the diet I planned to start when I was fully satisfied with my body composition and just wanted to start maintaining. It’s a lot easier than what I’m doing.

    • Justin M

      By the way, I should add that my food choices are somewhat similar. I’m not saying to eat a ton of junk food or chips or anything. High quality protein, a range of healthy fats, some saturated fats, plenty of fruits/veggies, and then some low GI carbs post workout and in the morning.

  • Ken

    Keep up the great work on this blog! I have some questions about oxidizing fats:

    What are the actual cognitive and physical impacts of consuming oxidized fats? I read the blog religiously and i don’t think this has been covered, although i have heard Dave say he can see his kids’ behavior change when they consume oxidized fats.

    The bulletproof diet pdf has a great bar chart of unhealthy polyunsaturated fats, and notes that “Pork, duck, goose, chicken, and turkey are all relatively high in polyunsaturated fats. These meats must also be cooked to well done. This is why grass-fed beef and lamb are better choices.” Does the chart assume a consistent level of cooking across all types of meat, or for example are the grass fed beef and lamb are assumed to be rare in the chart while the other meats are well done?

    I’ve been eating 85% lean grass fed burgers a lot since I found this blog, which I cook in a frying pan with grass fed butter with some sea salt) with amazing results. I think it tastes better if I cook the meat to medium than to rare. How much do oxidized fat levels spike if i cook my grass fed burger to medium instead of rare?

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  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_SVAASXO3VZITJ3SW56OHP6GXXM jubilarme

    OK, I have been trying out the bulletproof diet for three weeks now. I feel good and have lost weight. I have listened to all the podcasts and am trying to stay true to the diet.
    There is a huge HOWEVER for me. At lunch and snack time at work I have to sneak around and clandestinely add large quantities of butter and coconut oil to my diet. Most of my coworkers share a mainstream belief that butter and fat is unhealthy. So far I have been lectured by two that I should not be using so much butter on my fish and veggies. One coworker shared with me a study about breast cancer being tied to the over consumption of fat.
    At my desk, I keep a stick of butter and munch on it all day but I always have to look around to make sure no one is in sight before I take a bite.
    It is embarrassing and I feel foolish sneaking butter as if it is a crime or a sin to eat butter. The fact is that it is socially unacceptable to eat butter or coconut oil with a spoon in public.

    You need to publicize the diet more so that mainstream America understands the importance of and the wondrous role of fats in the diet.

    • LDC

      I understand the embarrassment- I feel it at work, too. I tried making Bulletproof coffee in the kitchen in a little personal blender, and I had to lie and tell my coworkers that it was “ice cream” and that I was making a latte.

      Nowadays, I just put the butter in my cup, add coffee, and use the little frother gadget. Another way is to add butter to a little thermos and shake hard. Still good.

    • AG

      Put your butter in a low-fat yogurt cup…

    • Rachael

      You shouldn’t have to sneak around with your eating. If they say something, let them know you appreciate their concern, and that you would also appreciate it if they would kindly mind their own business.

  • Microwave Dude

    It is difficult to say whether or not microwave cooking
    is unhealthy.

    http://www.pyroenergen.com/articles/microwave-nutrients.htm

    These lines from the weblink sound very convincing:-


    When lightbulb was invented by Thomas Edison, many said that it is harmful to our eyes. When fluorescent lamp came out, a lot of people said that it is very harmful to our eyes and we can be blind soon. And now people said that microwave makes food poisonous and harmful to our health.”

    • http://armilegge.com Armistead Legge

      That’s a fair point. We aren’t sure it’s dangerous, but we aren’t sure it’s safe either. We do know it decreases the nutrient content of foods.

      • http://blueseed.co/faq.html dandv

        We also know that microwaving is more efficient at nutrient preservation than a number of conventional cooking methods such as boiling. See the studies references here.

    • Gear

      I would say that the worst the microwave is going to do is to break down some nutrients (after all you can’t expect the high energy shaking of molecules that the microwave causes to not effect the conformation/structure of some of the macromolecules in the food) so you may need to worry about some weird chemical isomers forming from the various molecules but i feel that is somewhat of a negligible effect.

      • Dave Asprey

        Lol. Studies show that fluorescent light ARE bad for your eyes and immune system. People have more energy without them.
        Microwaves thoroughly denature protein, and most leak radio waves that have biological effects. See Ribert O Beckers book.

        • http://blueseed.co/faq.html dandv

          Agree on light – studies have shown that blue LEDs also negatively affect immunity.

          Which of Becker’s book talks about microwave ovens being dangerous? Electromagnetism and Life? (Note: Becker also believed in parapsychology and other fringe stuff).

          Any cooking will destroy some nutrients, mainly through loss in the cooking water, and due to longer preparation times. Microwaves have been shown to actually be pretty good at retaining nutrients (Wikipedia references several studies). Would be interesting to see a study on protein denaturation.

        • Dave Asprey

          Yes electromagnetism and life!

        • Kim

          If fluorescents and LEDs are bad, which types of lighting are best?

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  • Bgharris

    My husband has been doing this for several months now. And the pounds are melting away. He looks awesome. I didn’t think it would work because of all the fat I thought he was eating. I was so wrong and I am now going to try it. I am going to have a had time letting the chocolate go. :(

    • Julie

      No need to give up chocolate, you just have to make it high-quality, very dark chocolate. I just finished eating an 85% dark chocolate bar. If I had the time, I’d make my own without the sugar, but eating 85% has only 5 g sugar/serving. It takes a while to get used to it, but now I’m not even tempted by the lower percentage or hershey’s type milk chocolates.

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  • Alexander

    Do you have a list of references you could share? The better of the studies I have read generally seem to support your diet, and I’ve heard it recommended by trustworthy people, but I can’t seem to find any links to the thousands of online research papers you mention using to develop it. Basically, it looks good, but I would be more confident in it if I could see firsthand some of the evidence behind it. (This applies particularly to the long term effects, as the short term effects I can just go and test).

  • Michael

    Hi Dave, I have a very esoteric question.

    I have been trying to find grass-fed beef around where I live for ages now and have had little success. However, I have quite bizarrely realized that I have an African Buffalo (as in the kind you might have seen in ‘Out of Africa’) farm nearby. Which are grass-fed, free-roaming and not pumped with chemicals.

    Do you know if there is any substantial difference between eating grass-fed beef steaks and grass-fed buffalo steaks?

    • JulietteD

      I’m not sure what Dave would say on this, but many other natural health gurus indicate that Bison is safe – due to the free-romaing and grass-feeding.

    • http://armilegge.com Armistead Legge

      Buffalo are awesome – right up there with lamb and beef :) Enjoy!

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  • EvaPsychobiology

    Hi Dave,
    Nice site! I have a few questions. Is the bullet proof diet also healthy for women (who do not necessarily want to be pregnant) ? Seen the fact that women have different ways of storing fat, different hormone levels? Will women built fat in stead of muscles more easily? Does a woman need to adust the proportions, or eat less?

    Thanks in advance!

    • Armi Legge

      I’ve added your question to the list for the podcast!

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  • Judy

    I found your site only a few days ago, but have been totally engrossed in the podcasts and all the info you have to offer!

    I’ve been trying to think of ways to adapt the bulletproof diet to my own preferences. My only hang-up so far is bread. I love the texture, and am trying to find a suitable yeast-free recipe using rice flour. What are your thoughts on rice flour, and are there any special considerations of which I should be aware when choosing a product?

    • Dave Asprey

      Judy, good luck on bread. After 10 years of trying, extensive testing in the kitchen and all brands I could find, I finally settled on baked mochi. Not bread, but perfectly clean and low in toxins. Holds butter and fillings well too. There is no gluten free bread that is also healthy. :(

  • Gren

    hi, do you have guidelines relating to seeds, predominantly pumpkin, sunflower, watermelon seeds and flax/sesame? I think these are great for healthy fats and proteins. Do you agree? Why are dried legumes to be avoided, again some of my favourites, garbanzo, kidney and black eyed beans? I thought they would be a good source of protein and have some excellent nutrients. I take it rolled oats are to be left out also?
    thanks

    • http://armilegge.com Armistead Legge

      All seeds can be high in mycotoxins, so be sure to get a high quality brand. They should never be roasted which would oxidize the polyunsaturated fats.

      Sunflower and sesame are too high in omega-6 to be considered healthy, but the others you mention are okay. Non of them are super high in nutrients, so they are mostly an overhyped health food to begin with.

      Oats and all grains are out. We’ve talked specifically why on the podcast in great length.

      Beans are a good source of protein if you are a starving african child in the middle of a famine – not if you have access to real food like grass-fed meat. There are tons of problems with legumes which we’ll be writing about soon.

      Here are a few studies that should make you reconsider beans/legumes as a health food:

      Rats fed alpha amylase inhibitors (a lectin found in beans) showed impaired digestion and retarded body growth:

      http://pmid.us/7782910

      Kidney beans make rat intestines leaky, allowing bacteria and toxins to enter the body.

      http://pmid.us/4018443

      Beans prevent the proper formation of stomach acid which impairs digestion.

      http://pmid.us/11595455

      Ingestion of bean lectins leads to bacterial overgrowth.

      http://pmid.us/8226393

      there are a lot more including ones showing tissue damage, hormonal dysregulation, and other problems. Legumes are almost as bad as grains – not bulletproof.

      • JulietteD

        Armistead, how do chia seeds rate? I’ve been giving them to my 1 year old regularly (he’s had issues pooping and I thought the fiber and other nutrients would be good). If you think they are too high in mycotoxins or are bad for any other reason, I’d like to know so I know to stop giving them to him. (I buy only organic chia seeds)

        • http://armilegge.com Armistead Legge

          Chia seeds are okay in general, and they certainly don’t seem as bad as many other nuts/seeds. All nuts and seeds can be a potential allergen, so I would stop giving them to your kid. If he’s having trouble pooping, I would give him some of the Probiotics we have on upgraded self. 80% of the weight of feces is dead bacteria, so its likely you child needs some more good flora. Hope that helps!

  • http://www.facebook.com/mony.chhim Mony Chhim

    Hi, I am currently trying out the diet and it works pretty well so far!

    One issue though: as I’m not from the US, I’m not very comfortable about interpreting “USDA-defined servings” so I’m not sure whether I’m eating the appropriate amounts or not (my metrics: weight = 60 kgs, size = 1m73, age = 26 years old)

    Would it be possible to get an equivalent in terms of mass? Like which mass of healthy veggies/fat/animal proteins/fruits I should get everyday?

    Many thanks!
    Mony

    • http://armilegge.com Armistead Legge

      Convert ounces to grams and you can figure out the USDA servings. Thats what i do.

      You need to eat more protein. 150 grams of fish is nothing.

      No. Eggs are fine. Factory raised eggs will increase oxidized LDL more than regular eggs, but they;re still one of the best protein sources in your situation. Eat as many as you like. Remember, LDL isn’t necessarily bad. Its oxidized LDL that can be problematic.

      • http://www.facebook.com/mony.chhim Mony Chhim

        Thanks! :)

        I use a anti-adhesive frying pan to cook my eggs without adding cooking fat.

        What are the most healthy ways of cooking eggs?

        • http://armilegge.com Armistead Legge

          No problem,

          I wouldn’t use a non-stick pan – they use teflon and other chemicals which leach into your food. They’re bad for you.

          http://stainlesscookwareforyou.com makes some less toxic versions.

          Add some MCT oil in a pan if you’re frying eggs.

          We’re going to be releasing a post soon about the perfect way to cook eggs, but soft boiling is a really good way. Just be sure to leave the yolks runny :)

          -Armi

        • http://www.facebook.com/mony.chhim Mony Chhim

          Really? All right I need to get rid of that crap!

          I’m looking forward to reading the post about the perfectly cooked eggs ;)

          And finally I found a producer who ships REAL organic grass-fed beef in France, hurrah!
          Here’s the link, in case I’m not the only French bulletproofexec:
          http://www.boeuf-au-bif.fr/

          Now I just need to find grass-fed butter (it’s like it doen’t even exist in France, which is supposed to be the freaking country of milk products!!)

          mony

        • http://armilegge.com Armistead Legge

          Great job Mony! Thanks for the link for grass-fed meat too :)

        • http://www.facebook.com/mony.chhim Mony Chhim

          Just found grass-fed butter from a local organic producer!!
          In spring the beasts eat grass, and in winter they eat hay.

          I also purchase from the same producer veals which are only fed with the milk of their grass/hay-fed mother.

          How good are these supplies?

        • Gymjohn

          They should sell Kerry gold in France, I’ve seen it there before

        • http://www.facebook.com/mony.chhim Mony Chhim

          Really?
          Do you remember where?

  • Jane

    Dave, just found your blog and read some of it. Interesting stuff.

    What I don’t get is the following:
    You write
    “No calorie counting, no measuring. Just eat and feel your brain, body, and hormones re-awaken as your effortlessly lose weight and gain muscle on little or no exercise.
    Target 50-60% of calories from healthy fats (this is easy and tastes good), 20% from protein, and the rest from vegetables.”

    How can we get 60% fat, 20% protein and some veggies into us if we don’t count calories/macros/micros?
    How do we know we have eaten 60% fat at the end of the day?

    Maybe I am missing something

    Thanks for clarifying
    Jane

    • http://armilegge.com Armistead Legge

      You eye ball it on your plate. It’s not important to eat *exactly* 60% fat. Thats just an estimate. If you have absolutely know idea what your intake is, you can weight/measure for a few days to get a better understanding of portions/amounts, then guestimate from there on out.

      • daniel

        You dont know how to spell “no” apparently, how can we be sure that the saturated fat your eating isn’t causing brain damaging mini-strokes ?

        • Amber Hurdle

          You mean “you’re” eating? Sorry dude, had to call that one out since your comment was about his spelling. I just got to this site for the first time, but this made my morning. Thanks for the chuckle! :-) I totally get your concern for what it’s worth.

        • mee

          This thread made me laugh

        • http://www.facebook.com/people/Lori-Maravilla-Hot-Box-Yoga/602159546 Lori Maravilla-Hot Box Yoga

          Your brain is made of fat….. and 25% of it is cholesterol you need fats for it to properly function. read “The Vegetarian Myth”

        • Kris

          There are plenty of fats and healthy fats that a vegan can get… I’m not saying everyone should be vegan. I don’t tell meat eaters they are not doing it right. Please don’t point a finger and shame the veggies of the world. Peace out and have truly a healthy and blessed day!

        • Sara

          Actually, the brain irs primarily made of protein…

        • damien

          Actually, the brain is primarily water…

        • Skilluck

          The brain is 70%+ made from fat.

        • Regina

          I am reading and can’t believe it! dude, the “fat” in your brain is not like you eat fat and it gets to your brain? God forbid, cause we would be dead by now if that happened ;) It is true that by some new research it is better to increase the amount of fat you eat, but please, check statements like this before you post it, it is bad advertisement ;)
          Brain primarily uses glucose to feed itself, that’s why you crave sugar when you study or smtg ;) the “fat” in the brain are fatty acids, but not the same as in the rest of the body and they are not used for energy but for structure ;)
          good luck!

        • Jesse

          She left out to from her sentence. Don’t be a dick dude.

        • highlydubious

          Daniel do you realize there is an apostrophe in don’t, as an illiterate how can we expect to take your comment seriously?

        • james

          Apparently you don’t know the difference between your and you’re. Better luck next time scrub.

        • Derek

          Why be such a pedantic prick?

        • Pedro Jones

          your mother is a whore

      • Barchiel

        How the F**K are you going to eat 60% FAT. DRINKING LARD????

        25% FAT
        35% CARBS
        40% PROTEIN

        Mofos making carbs look evil.

        Bro-science > PALEO

        • Bob

          Insulting strident assertions (and excessive use of emotional abuse of the caps lock key) convince no one. They just make you look immature.

        • alexschindler

          it’s really easy. a typical lb of steak will have a hundred grams each of fat and protein, no carbs. that’s 900 calories from fat, and 400 from protein. that’s about 70-30.

          add a mostly-greens salad to your meal, and voila. 60 20 20 or so, around 1400 calories. do that once a day if you’re a sedentary 100lb woman. do it twice a day plus an avocado and a morning omelette if you’re a 165 lb weight lifter trying to put on more lean mass.

          there’s a sample diet. took about negative three seconds to think of.

        • Barchiel

          HERE’S A PALEO DIET FOR YOU:

          EAT A DICK.

          ALL PROTEIN…AND A LIL FAT

          U NITWIT

        • laura

          Wow, Barchiel, now you really made yourself look like an ignorant jerk!

        • Barchiel

          WOW LAURA
          YOU REALLY MADE YOURSELF LOOK LIKE A BORDERLINE BULLETPROOF B¡TCH!

          GO MAKE ME A SANDWICH

        • Sara

          Let me guess…. You are a twelve year old boy who plays video games all day? *eyeroll

        • Barchiel

          WUTS WRONG WITH 12 YEAR OLD BOYS THAT PLAY VIDEO GAMES U SEXIST PIG

        • Pedro Jones

          are you using you rabbit on yourself?

        • Logicdon

          Is Everyone insane …. the body is 90% water and the brain (from the sounds of the above discussions) is 90% water and 10% grey matter !

        • Mike

          You suCk. You need to read tHis website in its entirety.

        • Barchiel

          FUCK U DIPSHIT

        • disqus_GxXI1mrpYX

          @Barchiel:disqus ….judging by your tone and language….I can tell you are truly dedicated to being the best human being possible (the mission of websites like this)….thanks for your input!

        • anglel

          That’s great. They say laughter is the best medicine!

        • Barchiel

          NO PROBLEMO

        • Jan

          My daughters were diagnosed with Juevenile Rhumetoid arthritis and Crohn’s Disease and were on nasty medications. Took them off wheat and sugar and they don’t need medications anymore. Perfect health and
          very happy.

        • Isthmus

          Since distinguishing between your and you’re seems to be a big problem, how about if we agree to spell “you” correctly?

        • Barchiel

          OK

          FUCK “YOU”

          HAPPY?

        • highlydubious

          I propose a solution, we grill and eat your 350 pound fat ass. I bet your at least 60% sat-fat

        • Barchiel

          Now THAT’S Paleo. No carbs, baby!

        • Isthmus

          If we’re not going to be civil, can we at least agree to use “your” and “you’re” correctly?

    • JT

      Don’t think so literal. 6 avocados, 2 pieces of meat and the rest vegetables.

    • Shay

      He’s not saying eat 60% fat, 20% protein and then vegetables. He’s saying get that PERCENTAGE of your caloric intake from those things. :) So no, not 60% of fat but 60% of your calories from healthy fats. Hope that helps!

      • Barchiel

        Thanks.

      • Adriana

        @Barchiel:disqus @b0db5f7ca9eda4617232d33cba475bcc:disqus , but then Barchiel is right, in order to take out the 60 % you still need to know your caloric intake ;), so I guess, yes, you have to find out your total daily calorie intake (which is different with everyone) and from that the percentage.

  • http://www.facebook.com/kristian.kornum Kristian Hund Kornum

    Hello Dave

    Love the program! Though I love fresh baked bread as well :)

    I am missing grapes on the fruits bar, though I see Dextrose(grape sugar) on the sugar bar.
    Also regular grape seed oil used for cooking, and grape seed extract(GSE) is missing.
    I would think that extra virgin grape seed oil would be close to the virgin olive oil!?

    FYI: MCT oil is not allowed to be sold in Denmark, but my brother in Frisco will hook me up with a quart for x-mas ;)

    Heard your interview in the Danish radio P1 program ‘The Harddisk’, good stuff! Spreading the word and Bulletproof Coffee is just out of this world, though I am at times forced to make it with Nespresso…

    BR

    Kristian Kornum

    • http://armilegge.com Armistead Legge

      Grapes are fine as long as you stick to 1-2 servings a day. They can be a hidden source of a lot of sugar and they’re easy to go crazy on.

      Grape seed extract is a supplement, not a regular food.

      Grape seed oil is higher in omega-6 than olive oil, and it should not be used for cooking. I’m unaware of any health detriments other than that.

    • Lars
    • Janus007

      Hi Kristian
      I’m able to buy MCT in Denmark, but it seems impossible to buy Kerrygold :( Have you found a store that ships to DK?

      • Madeleine Fulton

        Not sure if you can get it i Denmark, but the “Smjor” brand from Iceland is also 100% grass fed and cultured :) (It didn’t say on their website so I emailed them and that is what they told me.)

  • Vicky

    Hi Dave, maybe I’m a bit slow but do you count the carbs for vegetables, nuts ect. on the Bulletproof Diet and if so, how low should your daily carb-intake be?

  • Mike

    Hey, thanks for the guide! Quick question. Why cooked spinach in particular? Where does uncooked spinach sit on the vegetable scale?

  • Lecram

    I have read the posts and was wondering if anybody knows if shrimp, lobster, crab, and other shellfish are safe to eat on the bulletproof diet?

    Thanks,

    Lecram

    • http://armilegge.com Armistead Legge

      It depends. They should be wild caught if possible, but due to the low fat content, they won’t be super high in toxins. It’s a good idea to take chlorella tablets with them to block mercury absorption.

      • http://twitter.com/reptilegrrl Priscilla

        Wouldn’t selenium be a better option?

        • http://armilegge.com Armistead Legge

          No

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  • User666

    Is it easy to find yourself constipated while going on the
    bulletproof diet ?

    • Dan Linehan

      Should be the opposite in the beginning, as your body adjusts to the extra MCT oil / saturated fat intake.

      • Dave Asprey

        Strange. The graphic us the old version. White is better. Will fix ASAP.

      • Dave Asprey

        Not normally. Add magnesium (citrate, aspartate, orotate, or Calm) until it goes away!

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  • balu

    hey where did the full graph went? grains, fat… was still there yesterdday

    • Dawid from Poland

      The more saturated fat in the diet the better the “end product”

  • Mike

    I need recepies … where to go?

    Oh … and by the, how can you get yourself to eat raw butter? I like the smell of butter and the taste that it gives to brokoli, but just thinking about eating it raw make me ill :-/

    • http://armilegge.com Armistead Legge

      We have recipes on the site, and more are coming every week:

      http://www.bulletproofexec.com/tag/recipes/

      Other than those, just use paleo recipes and match them to the parameters of the bulletproof diet.

      We don’t eat raw butter, you put it on stuff.

      • Jonathan Reilly

        That link you posted returns no hits for me (404 file not found). :)

  • Matt Castleberry

    uh…what category does beer fall into?

    • Jonathan Reilly

      Beer is made from wheat. It’s loaded with Gluten. Avoid it. Sadly- the darker and more flavorful the beer, the worse it is for you. :( I LOVE big beers. This makes me SAD.

      • jonathan jetter

        most beers are made from barley. some beers are made from wheat. some (traditional lambics, for example) are a combination of wheat and barley. a few beers are made from rye. a very few are made from rice.

        me personally…..i’ve noticed massive health improvements (both physical and mental) from changing my diet. so i’m not inclined to completely give up beer. i’ve cut back on my drinking but don’t want to completely stop. brewing is really an art form at the higher levels.

        • Scott Faculak

          Beer is hard to give up but I did find 5 different gluten free brands around my area and there not half bad. St Peter’ Sorghum is the best so far, but I’m open to recommendations!!

        • Dave Asprey

          Cutting gluten out of beer is a good step – but the mycotoxins, ochratoxin, and uric acid problems exist. Beer is at the far right end of the alcohol. Vodka drinks are best!

        • Manny

          wow no offense man but life must suck having to worry about not having beer :(

        • Paul

          Oh totally – just think that there are people who don’t drink any alcohol at all! I am one of them, and I can tell you for sure that life just sucks more than anything I could imagine… :p

          Looking forward to the 2012 update – this is great stuff.

        • SmartL

          Simply horrifying. I don’t drink either and my life is so sucky I’m ready to kill myself….NOT.

        • Heimdal

          I was wondering about just this , you say that Vodka “drinks” are the best? Meaning Vodka mixed with sugar liquids is still better then straight up Whiskey?

          Would love to know.

        • Dave Asprey

          Sugar and chemical free vodka drinks! (Note BUlletproof eggnog or hot chocolate with vodka…)
          Sent from my nobile phone. You understand….

        • Dave

          Bulletproof ”EGGNOG”??? Now that i gotta find on your site….

        • Dave Asprey

          Taking activated charcoal with beer along with vitamin C will go a very long way towards helping you stay high performance if you use beer.

        • mreen

          Although, avoid activated charcoal if you are on any medications, as it will make them less or ineffective.

        • Dave Asprey

          …or just don’t take them at the same time!

          Sent from an iphone. That means it’s spelled wrong…and I’m probably lost. You understand… -Dave

      • Desre_reck

        What about Whiskey? What can one drink on this diet?

        • Dave Asprey

          Vodka is the best. See the alcohol infographic on the site! ?

      • dhaener

        Beer is only made from wheat in select cases. It is primarily made from malted barley.

  • hitfan

    I’m perusing the web regarding various diets. Regardless if it’s the Atkins, Bulletproof, Acid/Alkaline, Celiac, Paleo, they all seem to have one thing in common:

    Wheat is bad for you. Weight gain and even autoimmune disorders have been attributed to it.

    Many of the above diets can be extreme, but if people just cut sugar and wheat from their diets, it improve health considerably for so many people.

    • http://armilegge.com Armistead Legge

      Very true:)

    • Kevin

      Sugar and Fructose seem to be the straws that break the camel’s back… because traditional diets which include grains do not, in certain places of the world, inhibit populations to live to old age without disabling diseases… Nonetheless, science does point out that “diseases of civilizations” can be attributed to grains and sugar/fructose…

      • Allie

        Societies that ate grains successfully almost always fermented them. Throw them in some raw yogurt or kefir for a day or two and the nasty lectins deteriorate rapidly.

        • gmeades

          Sorry, Allie, but I believe your statement is both factually and historically incorrect.

          yogurt and kefir are NOT fermented grains. They are fermented dairy. The modest amount of “kefir grains” used in it’s culturing is minimal at best, and is removed while the milk culture remains. Both of these items are far lower in carbohydrate than their labels suggest, as the fermenting process itself converts the milk sugar, lactose, into lactic acid which gives it its unique flavor. A half cup of plain yogurt is estimated to have approximately 2 carbs, despite what the figure on the label says due to the inaccurate way the FDA calculates carbs (whatever is leftover after fats and proteins have been accounted for).

          Aside from kefir, which most people are unfamiliar with, I do not believe you will find any examples of “fermented grains”, aside from those used for distilling of alcohol and the making of beer. If grain is not fresh, it is regarded as stale or spoiled. When grain spoils, it does not “ferment”, but becomes either stale or moldy.

          Also, according to my research, Lectin (a carbohydrate binding protein) is primarily found in grains and soy products, which is another reason to avoid them

          http://www.marksdailyapple.com/lectins/#axzz2bH9fg7Cf..

        • Allie

          Sorry, gmeades… but i didnt say they were. I said that cultures have successfully eaten fermented grains. And then said for kevin to throw them into yogurt or kefir… perhaps a more careful read next time?

        • Pedro Jones

          youre brain dead and cant read. wheat bread is the stape of life and has fed millions for millenia.

        • James

          Pedrio, you’re partially right.

          Yes, we’ve been eating bread for thousands of years.
          However, the wheat has evolved.

          Basically, wheat, unlike humans, can gain chromosomes when breeding. The first grain we consumed had 16. Then 32. Then 48 and so on. The ‘wheat revolution’ in America caused a lot of problems. By trying to grow taller, bigger and more efficient crops, things just changed. Too many chromosomes.

        • alexschindler

          Not taller crops. the opposite is what has been genetically engineered: Dwarf wheat with a higher edible output.

        • Chloe Blue

          Very well said — the “wheat” of ancient times is not the same as factory farmed, pesticide-laden, nasty GMO wheat.

        • Grace Grace Jah

          research the history of wheat. it has changed a lot in the last few hundred years. also the yeast you use has an effect on its digestability (sourdough yeast vs monoculture yeast available in grocery stores), and bread from the past was commonly made from flour mixtures, wheat flour mixed with bean flours etc. i think that, at least in europe, wheat was considered a highclass food and the large poor populations often made their bread from other stuff.

        • King of Scorpions

          Not millenia Pedro, about 10,000 years, when agriculture was first instituted. Not long enough to fully adapt to. It takes a few 100,000 years for our bodies to adapt. However, we have eaten high calorie density animal fat and protein en mass for for about 3.5 million years.

        • pootanki

          The wheat you’re talking about is a far cry from the wheat we eat today. Ever since the Flour Mill, we have refined our wheat to the point it is almost unrecognizable from the wheat we ate before that time. IOW it’s pure sugar now. That’s how it breaks down in our bodies. And keep in mind wheat was not available to the masses before the Flour Mill was invented. Wheat was usually consumed by the wealthy. The Flour Mill was a food revolution in producing (and removing all the beneficial nutrients) in wheat for massive consumption and ever since that point, one can see a slow but steady rise of all the negative health results that came from that

        • JRS

          Fermented grains = sourdough.

        • victor

          Sourdough still has gluten…less true but if you’re gluten intolerant less doesn’t cut it.

    • Pedro Jones

      Ive eaten wheat my whole life, as have millions more with no health problems.

      • Garrett K

        What is your definition of ‘no health problems’?

        • Pedro Jones

          Are you stupid or can’t read English?

        • Martin

          Well, you kinda seem like an aggressive and hostile person…Try cutting out wheat for a while and see if you feel like communicating to people in a slightly nicer way:) Have a beautiful day! (Oh, god…How pretentious am I right now?)

        • lester jones

          Martin youre a sheep that buys what quacks say to promote fad diets. And youre retarded. http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2013/09/26/226510988/doctors-say-changes-in-wheat-do-not-explain-rise-of-celiac-disease

        • Jim

          From your link…
          “I never thought that wheat was toxic,” says Donald Kasarda, who has studied gluten proteins for more than 40 years as a research chemist for the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
          “My name is Donald, I’m from the government, and I’m here to help”
          Sheep?

        • Lil

          Let me guess, 9/11 was an inside job… -_-

        • Mike

          Does nobody here understand the usage of an apostrophe?

        • Lil

          While I don’t appreciate the insult to “retarded” people, I do appreciate the article.

      • Maria

        read “wheat belly” by William Davis http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=wheat+belly
        for the history and health benefits/drawbacks caused by eating wheat.

      • MisLis

        At what point do you finally open your mind to the idea that you don’t know EVERYTHING. Also, what is good for you is not good for everyone. In addition, who says you have “no health problems”?

    • lester jones

      post links to the medical and science journal articles and research studies that prove that. Everyone I know that eats wheat and sugar are in good health.

      • Grace Grace Jah

        arthritis?

      • alexschindler

        Everyone? You do not know a single person in less than good health, except those who eschew wheat and sugar?

        lucky you. must be awesome living on an island of health. Must be sad not knowing any old people though.

    • MM

      I have to agree with this. I have cut grains and sugar and it has been life changing. The biggest one is my eyesight improved in a major way. dropping weight to my High School days feels pretty good to.

  • june

    While I’m grateful for the work you and the Paleo community are doing on nutrition, I just can’t understand why the experts can’t be fully honest about where we are with the research and what is ACTUALLY known. “Dietary fat does not cause cancer and heart disease”, “Refined grains and carbs do”…etc. Every bullet point you’ve included is an exaggeration and premature conclusion in respect to what science is telling us right now. None of those points have been determined.

    • csp8

      just about everything you hear on tv or read in a book/magazine by an expert is intentionally meant to mislead you. that goes for every subject – history, politics, medicine, health, etc. people in power do not want an informed public.

      • Dave Asprey

        With respect, I disagree. You just need to read all the literature.

        • A. Wood PhD

          This is total nonsense. Everything you say is persuasive language to convince people who do not know of the science. I presume you know you are scamming people, it just depends how long it takes for your customers to realize it. Hm?

        • Dave Asprey

          To say this doesnt work or is a scam, It takes more than questioning my integrity.
          The diet is totally free…I lost 100lbs. Read the testimonials. Where’s the scam? I dont get it.
          Sent from my nobile phone. You understand…
          -Dave

        • medsnor

          You are pretty open about your modafinil and testosterone use, which have serious fat loss and appetite suppressing properties. Were you on any drugs when you lost your 100lb?

        • Joni

          Any update to this?

        • NCanon

          Precisely

        • Dave Asprey

          Hmmm…at this point, most people would just delete non-helpful comments like this that don’t even offer anything I can improve. I suppose the proper reply is “I know you are but what am I?”
          Seriously – if you want something on the blog improved, or clarified, or whatever, just ask and I’ll work on it. If you just want to bitch, must you clog the forum with useless bitching instead of constructive bitching?

        • NCanon

          The difficulty is that there are so many assumptions in your theories that fail to pass the sniff test. What you do is look at a bunch of studies that show certain mechanisms at work or hint at certain outcomes, then use them to create an entire diet system that, in many cases, goes against basic biochemistry.

          I would love to engage in a debate with you and have certain points clarified, but I’ve seen a few responses to others that include comments like “You haven’t looked at the research”, which in and of itself makes a tremendous assumption about your audience and assumes their ignorance. So far this entire system seems to lack any appreciable peer review, and certainly those I’ve shown it to (including several individuals who conduct precisely the sort of research you’re citing), are somewhat amused by the conclusions- not that the underpinnings are entirely false, but that there is a tremendous leap of faith made from peripheral findings to sweeping conclusions.

          Generally, when the existing literature is still in such an early phase, as it is regarding MANY of the studies cited above, the informed scientist or individual makes suggestions, not absolute statements. Hence, it seems to be 80% marketing and hype and 20% substance. I apologize for the dismissive comment above, you’re absolutely right, that wasn’t constructive. However, as someone who’s spent eleven years engaged in primary research on the human diet (specifically in developing countries), I hate to see what could easily have been a piece of MY work taken wildly out of context and used to support what amounts to questionable science.

        • http://www.facebook.com/people/Peter-Kubicki/703337984 Peter Kubicki

          It would be very silly for something to refuse to eat until they examined peer-reviewed papers. That is why people eat certain foods, and if they are intelligent they will stop eating foods that make them unhealthy and continue eating the foods that make them healthy. Intelligent people will also talk to others about their diets. This is why some people in non-Western cultures are very healthy; they’ve learned over hundreds or thousands of years which foods were good and which were bad, all without peer-review studies.

          Therefore, if someone tries the Bulletproof diet and they feel really good, then they can continue the diet, but if they feel bad, then they can discontinue the diet. They need to eat anyway, so it isn’t like they would have wasted their money on a product they don’t ordinarily purchase. It’s a win/not lose situation.

        • Gladina Vuletic

          Thanks for putting a logical comment on here. It’s so true and the power of n-1 means a lot. Sure…we don’t have a ‘tribe’ these days which serve as a sort of foundation from which people can draw security from…but instead personal experience contributes greatly.

          Speaking of the sense of the word ‘tribe’…tribes develop in more conceptual forms (in modern times). It’s not lost and [we] are still driven by evolution which is reflected in our behaviours. So if we don’t have what looks like a ‘tribe’, but once you collect people’s n-1 they start to grow and emerge and thus one could start to see ‘like minded’ people which could be seen as an extension of the concept of ‘tribe’.

          Evolution provides answers…even if our environment doesn’t LOOK like it once did…the behaviours still remain and we can use those behaviours to our advantage, so yes, Peter I really like what you say and indeed it really IS a ‘win’ situation. Not a ‘lose’.

        • NCanon

          Absolutely- I agree 100%. However, what I object to is the couching of all of this under the guise of well-backed research- it is not. If this entire diet was based on recommendations and the idea that “Hey, logically this all seems to make sense and I and others feel great on it”, I’d have ZERO objections. However, the endless out of context citations to sketchy, tangentially related studies look more like attempts to “force” credibility.

          There’s nothing worse than using bad science to back up ideas. It’d be better to leave it out entirely, otherwise it’s a huge red flag.

        • JasonHooper

          Never once did you cite any specific study that was contextually questionable, or challenge any particular part of the diet. Not to say that you are not allowed to post subjective, opinionated comments with a self righteous tone, but I am also allowed to recognize it as such. I have seen posts from people who disagree with this information, but debate it in a constructive way by stating their own research or studies that justify their argument. You seem like an intelligent human being more than capable of structuring a useful point of disagreement. Why do you choose not to?

        • Dave Asprey

          Thanks guys. The BP diet evolves. Show me where it can be improved and it will be!
          Sent from an iphone. That means it’s spelled wrong…and I’m probably lost. You understand… -Dave

        • JasonHooper

          Dave, thank you for sharing your ideas with us, organizing it into an easy to follow plan and publishing it on the internet (and podcasts) for free. I have tried almost every diet, taken close to a thousand different supplements and with bulletproof, I am experiencing the most profound results in a very short period of time. I feel like a million bucks all the time–it’s awesome! I am not sure what certain individuals gain from trolling here and it makes me very glad that I bought an emWave.

          The framework that you have in place is fine the way it is. If you start adding every food and every ingredient, you take away from the spirit of being bulletproof. Aren’t we supposed to just adhere to the principals that you have outlined (eat the proper macro nutrients, supplement with micro nutrients, and avoid toxins) and experiment with different foods and supplements to see how it makes us perform?

        • chriswill

          I did a 17 day juice fast and I’m now eating Bulletproof. Three years of chronic fatigue and a lifetime of ADHD is GONE. My T was low and my blood pressure was high and both of those have turned far in the other direction…just ask my wife ;) I’m off my meds and feeling GREAT.

          Dave says he “distilled’ the knowledge and much comes from “self-experimentation”. As far as I can tell he notes some specific studies he used as a starting point for his own self-experimentation and invites us to do the same. I’ve laboriously read through much of this literature and after doing my own research and self-experimentation have concluded that the guy is on to something.

          Say what you want but when it comes to individual biology it’s ALL an experiment. I eat crap, I feel like crap. I eat Bulletproof, I feel bulletproof. I wouldn’t even care if BP Diet kills me ten years sooner than eating ding-dongs. I’d rather feel good during the precious years I’m given! I felt DEAD last year so what’s the difference?

          I’m reading a book called Salt Sugar Fat and it proves the science behind the ‘Standard American Diet’ is more evil, insidious, and manipulative than you could possibly imagine. Talk about bad science!

          Thank you Dave for giving me a starting point to learn about my own health – thanks to you I can take it from here! :-)

        • lintwalk

          Love the diet Dave, and appreciate your approach.

          TILAPIA. Always farmed. Never good.
          Just wanted to make sure your followers understand the importance of wild seafood…

          Cheers!

        • NCanon

          Jason, and Dave as well- my problem isn’t with the overall concept, please understand that. It is with the misrepresentation or misunderstanding of research.

          For example, the study showing advanced elimination of vitamin D proposes that 25-OH-D3 binds to fiber, making no claims that it is GRAIN fiber that is unique in this property.

          The statement that phytic acid from whole grains blocks absorption of certain minerals- true, phytic acid is a chelating compound, but it is found in greater concentrations in almonds and other tree nuts, which ARE recommended by the diet.

          The study regarding brown rice and protein absorption was conducted on subjects eating little else BUT rice, and made no statement about possible clinical findings or concerns. Lower protein absorption is not clinically significant unless drastically low protein intake is a concern, and quite frankly this is not an issue for most healthy individuals.

          Should I go on? These were listed as “studies that prove the principles of this diet”, and they do not.

          Quite honestly, I don’t see why you call this “trolling”. It’s not. Nothing I have said is untrue, I have no competing interest, and I have no reason to be a “hater”- I appreciate the multitude of passionate individuals out there working towards a greater understanding of the science, but do not like it when people with a following cite the research out of context. As a researcher myself, I find that somewhat dishonest.

          Lintwalk- No reason to go ad-hominem. I’ll gladly place my athletic performance and bloodwork up against anybody’s, but that’s not the point.

        • JasonHooper

          I appreciate your insight on nuts and their phytic acid content. According to Mark’s Daily Apple, research in 2007 showed that Americans at an average of 610 calories of grains daily, but only 89 from nuts. If nuts are not used as a principal source for nutritional intake, the exposure to phytic acid is less substantial. The individual must make the choice whether any particular food item contains enough benefit to consume, and in what amount. We must not treat any nutritional plan as a “one size fits all” program. This is where bio-hacking comes in. We have to pay attention to how foods (and supplements) effect us on an individual basis.

          I would welcome any other thoughts you have regarding the research published here. We need more critical evaluation from educated people, such as yourself to get us to think about our dietary choices.

        • Dave Asprey

          Note nuts also have omega 6 content and high mold potential (esp ground and slivered)…they are moderately recommended.
          Sent from an iphone. That means it’s spelled wrong…and I’m probably lost. You understand… -Dave

        • NCanon

          This is true- however, this is why I would approach some recommendations with caution, and why I am against (in principle) citation of primary research without adhering to author’s conclusions. Nuts are indeed an excellent source of other nutrients, but if the concern is exposure to high amounts of chelating agents in the diet (such as phytic acid and tannins), then the consequences of recommending an increase in other types of food must be considered.

          Again, the inclusion of the citations I mentioned would seem to indicate that there is a concern regarding chelating agents and soluble fiber in the diet, however BOTH these things are found in VERY high concentrations in fruits and nuts. It would be difficult to claim that replacing grains with fruits and nuts would not cause an INCREASE in the intake of phytic acid (from nuts), tannins (from many fruits), or soluble fiber (from both).

          I appreciate the distinction you’re making regarding individualization- I do apologize for my initial tone. It is all too often that figures who are seen as authorities use their bully pulpit to push bad science- as a primary researcher, I’d like to think it incumbent upon these authorities to recognize both the strengths AND the limitations of what I and others produce, and not make any end claims that are not substantiated or confirmed. Again, nothing wrong with stating “Here is a solid idea or work in progress with great results and some evidence”, but saying “research can prove this” when it does not is taking it a step too far. Those without a scientific background may take a theory as fact, and not exercise proper caution or skepticism before implementing.

          Cheers.

        • Regina Peterson

          This is a delayed observation but….how come previous diet recommendations (USDA) that are followed by the country and most physicians, are touted and followed as gospel with flimsy research and facts to back up their claims be ok? Do you go to those sites and refute their “claims?” Do you write to the government to ask why they make these claims without the science to back it up? (For example, eating “heart healthy grains” – grains are not a essential nutrient and in fact contain anti-nutrients, almost all manufacturers of grains add vitamins and I don’t even think you need research to prove that there are plenty of veggies that will provide fiber). I understand your need to have science to back up health claims – but why is it that anyone that gives advice to the opposite of USDA has to have “science” to back up every claim and then the science presented is attempted to be picked apart with a fine toothed comb? (That is not to say the science isn’t there, just ignored). Just wondering if you also direct your energies to all who make diet claims….

        • NCanon

          They’re (the guidelines) actually not flimsy at all- I’d strongly suggest you check out the incredible amounts of data that went into the USDA analyses- it’s actually quite impressive. While admittedly FAR from perfect, and with major holes, the recommendations on macronutrients, vitamins, and minerals represents one of the most impressive meta-analyses of population norms, disease prevalence, allergen tolerance, and so on and so forth that I (and many others, I’m sure) have ever seen.

          I do agree with your general point, though. “Question everything” should apply to what we take as gospel! Nevertheless, I have a hard time accepting poorly (and selectively) interpreted data as a rebuttal of imperfect (but well buttressed) current accepted practice. :)

        • PSYCHONAUT

          I request that you “go on” with your claims against this diet. Not only to prove you aren’t just a big bluff, but for the sake of everyone pursuing the bulletproof executive diet. Thanks NCANNON, your time and knowledge is much appreciated.

        • SmartL

          If you don’t agree, then stop reading it.

        • Peggy Holloway

          The health/nutrition recommendations on this blog have been backed by years of impeccable research by elite scientists. Please read the works of Stephen Phinney and Jeff Volek. I also suggest “Good Calories, Bad Calories” by Gary Taubes. About 1/3 of the book is the bibliography which cites study after study (real science, not diet diary data mining) showing that it is a diet based on grains, sugars and starches in a population that has not evolved to handle them due to ineffective insulin response that is at the root of the “diseases of civilization” and epidemic of metabolic syndrome-related ailments.

        • lintwalk

          Hey long-winded guy, here’s a crazy idea: TRY IT. Correctly and Aggressively, and then look at yourself in the mirror. 3-6 Months down the road. Get your blood-work and a spectra cell test, etc.

          Then write long entries. Wrong order buddy.
          Haters gonna hate…

        • Joe

          And how exactly does having a different opinion equate to hate? This sort of language is lazy hyperbole. Grow up.

        • Kevin

          Ckeck out the Gary Taubes book… Good Calorie, Bad Calorie.

        • Bigskyguy

          Good science is one thing but all breakthroughs begin with an assumption and then an attempt to prove or debunk that assumption. I have personally seen great results from Zone dieting on beef and beer but that got even better on a Paleo style component Zone diet. I have never tried IF but I am starting to try that out as of a week ago. The point is, the “hacking” movement isnt about publishing a paper. It is all about taking possible outcomes, leaps of intuition, based on some studies and testing it on yourself and anyone else that feels like trying it. Take Tim Ferris, or Asprey or Sears or Rogan, or anyone else that is outside the accepted norm, they are not asking to be published, or proven by the accepted scientific method. If it sells books or coffee or whatever, who cares? As long as the people trying any new school of thought out are having good results and making new progress, all the anecdotal evidence is fine by me.
          I have never posted anything on a website comment before but this just sort of struck me. I respect science, I am a mechanical engineer, but so many studies have been shown corrupt, I appreciate all of the above mentioned people and their insights.

        • GrzeTor

          I think these people suffer from scientism.
          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scientism

          Which is particularly visible in the case of diet. A proper diet is something that various animals do for a billion of years automaticaly or intuitively. Pre-science living people also didn’t have problems with that. Basically you don’t even need science to desing a diet. Notice both cases were stemming from empirical experiences – either being the result of natural selection, and transferred in genes, or being a result of empirical experiences and transferred via culture. Basically empirical, but not scientific stuff. Those suffering from scientism reject such justifications, usually only accept peer-reviewed publications as a valid information. Eg. they can’t work for intelligence or detective agencies that use uncertain stuff like information from informants as a source of information as an important input.

          Being a scientismist puts them a the mercy of the artefacts of the current state of science, This puts them at the mercy of the current state and artefacts of science. For example if there’s some lack of scientific knowledge about something they are not able to make a decision. If there’s an timing artefact eg. if scientific publications of negative sides of consuming fats and proteins showed up earliry, but for some time there were no papers about most of the bad side of carbs (as they would show up earlier) then in the meantime a scientismist would consume some kind of 80/10/10 diet.

          But those ones on this page are the most annoying kind. They use this dishonest debating technique where they demand the opposing side to do a lot of work for free, according to their requests, and if you don’t do the work they demand they claim you lost. The work like study metaanalyses, that the scientists are well-paid to do, with grants etc. – they want you to do and publish for free, on their demand as a part of a discussion with them, otherwise they suggest you are some kind of a dishonest liar. Sometimes they justify it by the rule that “a claimant has to provide a proof”, and they usually reject other rules like “it’s the beneficiary who has the burden of search”.

          Most of those suffering from scientism are not like that, they actually eagerly cite various papers, and actively, from their own initiative search for them. Without much control for corruption in science and stuff, as they are believers, but useful anyway.

        • jawsman

          It worked for my aspbergers, which is more than I can say for your pill pushing.

        • Bob

          Scam? Dave offers things on his store but often suggests that other sources can be good and that his are vetted and what he personally uses. He even has a post on how to find low toxin coffee that isn’t his.

          Strident assertions are not an argument.

        • Peteo

          OH. MY. GOD. There is TONS of science supporting this. Check out the NIH website even. But, no free answers for sheep. Wake up and follow the money. I know from my own anecdotal accounts this works; best lipid panel ever. Your “science-backed whole grain diet” almost ruined my life. Again, follow the money. Shaking my head.

        • mary christine

          Tell that to all the infertile women who then discovered the bulletproof diet and got pregnant.

        • Guest

          I agree. So much of this is ridiculous. If people actually went out and researched the information, they would realize how little sense this makes. It’s too bad people are ‘tricked’ into believe this information.

    • Peteo

      OH. MY. GOD. There is TONS of science supporting this. Check out the NIH website even. But, no free answers for sheep. Wake up and follow the money. I know from my own anecdotal accounts this works; best lipid panel ever. Your “science-backed whole grain diet” almost ruined my life. Again, follow the money. Shaking my head.

  • B3xx13

    Hi, a friend recommend I do this diet but I just have a few questions:

    Is there a more complete list of good and bad foods, for example you say you can have certain nuts but what about seeds? Also You say you can have good quality chocolate but what about 100% cocoa powder? thanks

  • hitfan

    So I’ve been ‘wheat-free’ since last Friday.

    My weight has gone down from 223 to 215.

    My pain from psoriatic arthritis has gone down considerably.

    I no longer have ‘brain fog’. In fact, I didn’t even know it because I assumed that it was a normal state.

    • hitfan

      By the way, I still had burger and fries (toss out the bun of course), eggs, steak. But I also eat a healthy amount of vegetables and fruits.

      I’ve not followed any lists except to avoid all wheat. I’ve never been diagnosed as a celiac, but just following that one single principle has already paid off huge dividends.

      I feel like I’m 20 years younger.

  • Kristian Kornum

    Hey Guys

    I have been getting into doing a lot of wok-food and asian in general. Do you guys have any clear knowledge on the different types of noodles.

    I realize that most of them must be pretty high in starch, similar to regular pastas, but I was wondering if you have ever heard of or seen any that are low-starch and carbs?

    But even if they are made of rice and low starch, it would be in the no-no range since it’s refined!?

    thx :)

    • Bell

      They have these Konnyaku or yam noodles which are extremely low carb, but high in fibre. They are a little strange though if you cook them for too long in a stir fry, so add them last. I like to put them in broth.

    • Jonathan Reilly

      Kelp noodles (found at the local Asian market for MUCH cheaper than you would find them online) have nearly no nutritive value. They can be stored at room temperature and are good for a year. I believe they are alginate based. soak them in warm water for a few minutes and rinse to rid yourself of any of the kelpy taste and you are good to go.

      They are HIGH in fiber. I believe they are nicknamed “Sea Broom” for their digestive clearing properties. They have about 5 calories for a gigantic serving. :)

      • http://butterandpills.tumblr.com/ Malia A.

        Kelp Noodles and Konnyaku Noodles are both found in asian markets. They are made from two different things though:

        Kelp Noodles, or Sea Tangle, are made of “kelp (a sea vegetable), sodium alginate (sodium salt extracted from a brown seaweed), and water.” They have a fair amount of calcium per serving. They have no smell and not much flavor. Kelp noodles are crunchier than Konnyaku, but soften after being cooked a bit.

        Konnyaku, which is (lovingly) called “stomach broom” by some, is made from the root of an asian plant. The root is dried and ground into a powder, then mixed with water and boiled to solidify the shape. Konnyaku noodles are more gelatinous, slippery, and have a definite fishy smell that you can (mostly) remove by boiling. Some konnyaku is made with added coloring, or with tofu added to it to make it look more like real pasta. KONNYAKU WILL PASS RIGHT THROUGH YOUR SYSTEM WITHOUT CHANGING SHAPE OR DIGESTING, so be prepared if you eat a lot of it at once.

        In closing, always flip the bag over and read the label first, just to see what you’re putting inside of you!

  • drgonzo541

    Hey Guy’s,

    I was wondering if you had a post anywhere about cooking. I see what you have up there, but I never heard of Steamed al dente way to cook meats like Grass fed beef. Blog post maybe? Just a thought.

    Thanks, for all the info. I just got done to a 30 paleo thing alla Robb Wolff Paleo Solution. Now I’m going to model my diet after your Bulletproof diet. I started yesterday with a IF and a Bulletproof Coffee. I ordered your coffee and MCT oil, and it was BOMB!! Thanks for the great product and info!!

  • http://www.facebook.com/kristian.kornum Kristian Hund Kornum

    I have a new problem. My GF has been following the diet as well, although digressing more often than me. In spite of that, she is loosing fat-mass while on the diet. She is already a slim figure and now she is loosing her female shapes, and designated female fat-deposits. ;) She’s not to happy about it, but really don’t want to have to start stuffing herself with refined carbs and sugar.

    So was wondering if you have any experience with women retaining some fat-mass while on the bulletproof or similar primal/paleo?

    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1115202741 Katherine Morrison

      She needs more starch. Potato, white rice, taro, tapioca/manioc are good sources of starch calories that will lack the toxins in most grains. Paul Jaminet of perfecthealthdiet.com writes extensively on the benefits of including some starches in a paleo (ie bulletproof) diet. Chris Masterjohn and Chris Kresser do as well.

      • Dave Asprey

        Yes, white rice or yam are your best choices. A new version of the BP diet with updates is coming soon where I write more about how to pick proper starches. Potato is not on the list due to lectin though. ?

        • AJ

          Hey Dave, is the new update out yet?

        • Dave Asprey

          Very nearly done!

        • Simon Carignan

          Hi Dave, regarding white rice and yam: on your infographic yams is closer to the avoid side whereas white rice is closer to the green side. I’ve been following Paleo for more than 1 year now (slowly moving towards bulletproof), but based on all the paleo reading I’ve done, yams seem to be a better choice over rice simply because they contain more nutrients. Is there any reason on why rice is ranked better than yams on your diet?

    • Miia

      When I (female) started on SCD/GAPS (close to Paleo) I initially lost weight the first month to the point of just being skin and bones.. But then started to gain quickly and now, month three, having a healthy weight. Now I need to watch that I do not gain way too much but I am prepared to see the weight fluctuating a bit as the body is adapting to a new way of eating.

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  • ButterBoy

    I have been eating a lot of Kerrygold butter lately.
    I found out a few days back that
    while Kerrygold butter is grassfed, it is not organic.
    http://www.kerrygold.co.uk/index.php?p=faqs,3
    Will consuming non-organic butter make my diet
    less bulletproof?
    So the last time I went shopping, I decided to get
    Organic Valley’s pastured butter.
    While OV’s butter is guaranteed organic, I thought that Kerrygold’s
    butter had a superior taste.
    What brand of butter would you recommend?

    • Dan Linehan

      Grassfed is generally going to be superior to organic grain fed. Moldy, low-quality, otherwise unsellable grains can still be used as feed, bringing with them a lot of toxin issues. Grainfed will also lack some of the nutritional benefits of grassfed, such as CLA, iirc.

      • Dave Asprey

        Grass fed is usually superior to organic, but organic Grassfed is best, and nearly impossible to find. Kerry Gold has been a solid brand, and I hope they keep their standards high.
        We, their largest consumers in the US, are watching!

  • Estosur

    First time posting on BPE. I just wanted to say that I had decided to begin eating the paleo diet at the end of this past year. I almost immediately found the BPD and jumped right in. Since my attempt at becoming bulletproof in the first weeks of January, I’ve lost just under 30lbs while doing intermittent fasting without any exercise. I feel completely re-energized. Thanks for the hard work put in and simplicity of its understanding.

  • Laurel

    Hi Dave,

    I’ve been reading through all the posts and am finding it incredibly interesting. I’ve been on a paleo-style, low-carb and low calorie diet for almost three years now (with periods of being moderately higher carb or calorie), and have literally not lost any weight (I am 5′ 8″ and 150 lbs). I also exercise regularly. However, I am currently very low fat, and I eat a fair amount of paleo foods that are on the red list (peanuts, soy milk, etc).
    I’m very excited by the ideas you’ve presented about fat consumption and toxin avoidance as building blocks for modifying a paleo diet to its best form. I have a few specific questions, though, which I hope someone can help me out with!

    1 – What is your stance on tea? I’ve read a lot about it being naturally moldy, but I’ve also read people in the comments mentioning they drink tea / chai. Currently, I drink about a cup of black tea a day, as well as a cup of coffee. I’ve ordered my bulletproof coffee but would love to be able to have the occasional cup of tea as well.

    2 – Is chicken something to avoid absolutely? I think largely from avoiding it for so long, I’ve actually stopped enjoying red meat. I will definitely bring beef and lamb into my diet, but is it okay to eat chicken in moderation as well?

    3 – What’s the best way to pick vegetables? The shopping guide has notes to avoid even a speck of brown, and I currently get vegetables mostly from our farmer’s market or as fresh and organic as possible at the store. From the list of healthy vegetable choices, is it pretty much okay to just pick the greenest organic vegetables you can find and try to eat them briskly? Is there some kind of method here?

    4 – I’m a little confused about spices. Are the spices listed above the only acceptable ones? Do leaf spices have to be purchased in fresh form? If dried spices are stored in the fridge / freezer, would that be acceptable?

    Sorry for the random questions, I’m just trying to learn as much as I can! I’m very excited to start this eating plan and just want to make sure I stick to it as thoroughly as possible.

    Thanks so much!

    • Dan Linehan

      Soy milk and peanuts are not paleo.

      • Dave Asprey

        Tea is ok if it’s green or white.

        If you’re eating red foods, you’re not eating Paleo!

        If you’re eating low fat, you’re not eating Bulletproof or Paleo.

        If you’re eating limited calories, you’re not Bulletproof.

        If you’re eating low fat low calories of any diet and exercising at the same time, you’re trashing your body and health. Up the fat. Ignore the calories. Exercise not at all for a month, then once per week for high intensity 20 mins ONLY.

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  • Commerce

    …”entrepreneur who spent 15 years and $250,000 to hack his own biology. He upgraded his brain by >20 IQ points, lowered his biological age, and lost 100 lbs without using calories or exercise. …”
    Holy shite.
    Whatever benefits there there may have been in this site were washed away right there.
    Does anyone with an IQ above his shoelace count believe this?
    There is is a lot in this field that is logical and maybe relevant.
    Maybe hugely relevant.
    Don’t screw with it with B.S.

    • Dave Asprey

      Commerce my friend – thanks for taking the time to read my blog and to comment on it. I may be odd – these giant feet of mine always mess up my shoelace to IQ ratio. But I’m serious about what I said in my intro. It’s all true, but you don’t have to believe anything you don’t like.

  • Ashley W Gale

    Dave,

    Your work is fantastic.

    Please, please, please compile all of your work into a book. It would be so appreciated. Also, your website is not always easy to navigate. Finding things can be tough.

    I am specifically interested in information about “resetting” hormones and body temperature. I ran across a post where you mentioned doing so but couldn’t find details about your methodology. Can you give me more information?

    • Dave Asprey

      Thank you! Book discussions underway, 2012 for sure. Promise to post body temp reset protocol ASAP! Working to upgrade the site too. ;)

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  • Libraryboi

    Please provide evidence of your claims.

    • Jonathan Reilly

      He’s added references on this splash page. Start clicking! :)

  • Jonathan Reilly

    This is essentially the Bulletproof Diet splash page.

    While it seems redundant (as the references for the claims made here are located elsewhere in the Bulletproof Exec site) I would recommend including links on this page to the references that support them.

    Statements made here, while backed up with research (in some cases limited but still compelling research), are not generally accepted as true by readers unfamiliar with it.

    As a critical thinker- I’ve conditioned myself to dismiss exceptional, new claims that do not list references or evidence and i bet I’m not the only one. :)

    While the health benefits made here are solidly referenced and researched. But I wouldn’t know that unless I went in a few pages. Adding these references would speed up any internal vetting process that new readers may have.

    • Dave Asprey

      Jonathan,
      Great idea! Thank you! Will get to work on that. The good news is that I have 14 reasons compiled (with research) about why this diet works. There will be a blog post for each of them, and the diet will be clickable to drill down. ;)

      • Jonathan Reilly

        Perfect! That productive (80 comment?) discussion over a simple photo of my morning Bulletproof Coffee demonstrated to me that having a reference next to every instance of a core claim would make this method easier on the scientific eye. :)

  • [email protected]

    What about Dr. Kruse stating to avoid coconut/MCT oil in the winter?

  • http://www.facebook.com/kristian.kornum Kristian Hund Kornum

    Hey Dave and Armi.

    Whenever defending a paleo/primal/bulletproof diet, the argument always comes up, that red meat is bad for you.

    http://www.latimes.com/health/la-he-red-meat-20120313,0,565423.story

    Yet another study that through some loose statistics concludes that red meat is linked to mortality.

    I still believe that the red meat mortality, might be more linked to high amounts of salt and refined carbs, connected to eating the meat.

    Do you guys have any specific pointers on the red meat arguments? Seems like the single most substantial argument against paleo diets.

    Hope to hear from you. :)

    Best regards, Denmark

    • Dave Asprey

      Good questions. The studies almost always are red meat from grain-fed cows which contain bad oils and mycotoxins. It is not the salt that is the problem – most people are deficient in salt thanks to low-salt recommendations that are not based on science. I gave a talk on this at the BIL conference; video is coming soon.

  • Dan Linehan

    It says that brown rice is better than white rice on the bulletproof diet grains chart, but in the research (number eight) it is mentioned that,

    “Brown rice (not white) prevents protein digestion and lowers nitrogen balance (a marker of muscle retention).”

    In light of this, what is it that makes white rice slightly worse than brown rice?

    Does the type of white rice make any difference (Himalayan versus Jasmine versus Texas?)

    • http://armilegge.com Armistead Legge

      We’re changing the rice recommendations in the next version. White is better.

      Rice grown in CA has lower arnesic levels than most other sources.

      • Christof42

        Hi guys, just reminding to change the Whire rice vs Brown rice order in the infographics :)

  • http://blog.andrewshell.org/ Andrew Shell

    Is chili powder or cumin bulletproof?

    • Dave Asprey

      It’s debatable. Fresh chiles are ok if you are not lectin sensitive. Dried often have mycotoxin problems, they are one of the worst. Cumin is generally ok.

  • Gear

    Ok here is my major question.. Where do excess calories go? My understanding of biochemistry and limited understanding of human physiology says that if you eat a digestable calorie that calorie is going to do one of a limited number of things.
    Case 1: Gets absorbed by the body and used in metabolism (whether that be in protein synthesis, cellular respiration, or one of the other myriad of things our bodies use energy for)
    Case 2: Gets absorbed by the body and stored as a lipid for future use (clear evolutionary advantages to why the body would do this)
    Case 3: (very limited/negligible) feeds intestinal.. ehh.. critters (mostly good I suppose)
    So where do any excess calories go? I find it hard to believe that you body is willing to just let the precious things go out the other end, so if not fat? Where? I’m not trying to shoot this down, just curious is all.

    • Dave Asprey

      See “it’s not the calories stupid” post to see how half of all calories are not used by movement. (sorry for the title; it was in reply to the NYT same title)
      Your poop totally has calories. Try burning it!

  • Robclark

    What about olives or pickles? Our, I guess more generally speaking, if its not on the graphic, is it not BP?

    Thanks!
    Rob

    • Dave Asprey

      You know, we need to add olives. They’re mostly in the green zone, if they’re not pickled in bad inflammatory spices (many of them are). Black olives are generally ok, as are many kalamata’s. Oil packed olives, not so good usually.

      • zingbo

        Makes sense…so are we looking for olives either in brine, or in olive oil, with no extra spices, in glass jars?

        • Dave Asprey

          Ideally, yes.

  • Robert Clark

    Are pickles or olives ok? or I guess more generally speaking, if it’s not on the list, should we assume it’s not on the BP diet?

  • Robert Clark

    I may have issues posting comments, but I’m going to try again:

    Would pickles or olives be on the BP diet plan?

    • Dave Asprey

      Yes if not pickled with bad spices or oils.

  • zewski

    I’ve adopted this style of eating and love it so far (using it in conjunction with kiefer’s Carb Nite Solution), however I’ve noticed that even after eating my fingers and toes are still really cold sometimes like they used to be when I messed with IF’ing

    I’m not hungry, but this normally tells me I’m in a deficit and my body’s dropping my body temp/metabolism.

    Should I up the food/fat intake if I’m too cold, or should I just buy some gloves and bear with it?

    • Dave Asprey

      Test it. If more fat helps, great! If not, titrate the carbs…

    • http://armilegge.com Armistead Legge

      Depends on your goals. Are you trying to lean out or gain mass?

      • zewski

        currently trying to drop the fat while maintaining as much muscle as possible. The diet is basically keto with a weekly re-feed.

        • http://armilegge.com Armistead Legge

          If you’re weight training, which you should be doing if you’re already lean (<15% BF), then I would also consume at least 1.5 grams of protein / pound of lean body mass.

        • Dave Asprey

          To be clear: that’s for bodybuilders, not anti aging or mental performance!

        • http://armilegge.com Armistead Legge

          His goal is losing fat and maintaining muscle.

        • http://www.facebook.com/people/Arkady-Kamenetsky/500049751 Arkady Kamenetsky

          IS building muscle/gaining mass incompatible with anti-aging and mental performance?

        • http://armilegge.com Armistead Legge

          Not necessarily. Depends on how you do it.

        • Dave Asprey

          If you recover properly, no! But gaining mass without recovery will sap your energy.

  • Terry

    How would you suggest adjusting the diet for a natural bodybuilder?

    • http://armilegge.com Armistead Legge

      If your goal is body building, just use these foods to hit your macronutrient and calorie targets.

  • g13day

    2012 update?

    • Dave Asprey

      Nearly complete!

      • Jacidi

        complete yet?

  • Matt McClard

    I am curious about what the difference is between the Whey Protein and Casein. I am just starting the diet, and typically I drink a (casein) protein shake in the morning, just trying to decide if I should bail on that kind and get some Whey or wait until i need some more.

    thanks

  • Gearhead

    Ok, I’ve been doing this for a month or so now, and I’m feeling pretty good. My weight loss seems to have plateaued but I can live with that for the moment. I have a book suggestion for Dave and Armi (or anyone else who is interested). It is titled “Survival of the Fattest” and it is authored by Steven Cunane. I picked it up at the library when I was doing some unrelated research and it has some really interesting information pertaining to micro-nutrients as well as the importance of fatty acids in the diet. Also I have a question that is bothering me. I know that shellfish are good (due to the micro-nutrient array available in them) however I also know that these are bottom dwelling filter feeders. Regardless of where these things are caught are the toxins not going to be an issue according to the fundamentals of the bulletproof diet? I am speaking mainly of coastal bivalves here.

  • Lecram

    1) I read on the site that you can take butter with you when you travel on planes, etc. Isn’t that unsafe? I thought that keeping butter at room temperature for long periods of time would be dangerous?

    2) I like to eat organic brown rice cakes with coconut oil or butter spread on top? Is that bulletproof?

    Thanks a lot,

    Lecram

    • Gearhead

      Butter is fairly stable at room temperature.

      • Dave Asprey

        Butter keeps well at room temp for several days. Colder is better.

        Rice cakes are very high GI and inflammatory. Try Mary’s Gone Crackers if you must have rice crunch taste.

        • John Machino

          Does Ghee keep even longer because it is purified more? If I leave all my ghee at room temperature in a sealed glass jar is there anything to worry about? Oxidation? Bacteria? Thanks.

        • Dave Asprey

          Ghee will keep for years at room temp

        • Dave Asprey

          If there’s no moisture in the ghee, it will keep fine at room temp.

  • gb

    What about a Pea Protein supplement?

    I use the Now Brand Pea Protein which uses Non-GMO vegetable protein and the amino acid profile is higher than the Whey proteins I have seen.I know Whey Concentrate is best, but if it is a grass-fed Whey version, it is very expensive and difficult to find. I assume this is better than a non-grass fed regular Whey Protein Concentrate powder.

    • http://armilegge.com Armistead Legge

      Pea protein is lower in BCAAs, threonine, and methionine than whey protein, and it also doesn’t increase glutathione levels. It’s probably better than soy protein, but far from optimal. You’re better off consuming a non grass-fed whey isolate or concentrate.

  • Jimmy

    Dave, love your site. I’m trying to follow the bulletproof diet, but running into a small problem. I’m having trouble coming up with meals that have some variety. Would you recommend a site or a book that I might be able to find some varied recipes that use the foods your recommend? Thanks so much for your site and thought.

  • Stephklop2007

    Is prosciutto ok to eat?

    • Dave Asprey

      Sorry, prosciutto is cured and usually has mycotoxins, nitrates, and biogenic amines. Sad; it’s tasty. ?

  • Sidravati

    Does aged, raw milk cheese belong with other raw & cultured dairy or with “any cheese” on the table above?

    • Dave Asprey

      Yes, any cheese.

      • Sidravati

        Is there somewhere on the site that explains why? Is it casein or molds or…?
        p.s. I’m enjoying your work very much. Still trying to understand all the components. Also, I used HeartMath in 1998 when you had to put electrodes all over. It was very useful. Curious to try other suggestions too.

  • Scott Faculak

    To avoid overcooking has anyone used a Sous Vide (Hot water bath) or is there another recommended way to cook fish, beef and lamb?

    • Elai

      You can bake it with a convection oven. A halogen convection oven (like the flavorwave) has precise temperature control and heats up faster.

  • retrainyourbrain

    Hi Dave, Thanks so much for all of this. What do you think of Saint Benoit organic milk and yogurt? Cooking is reduced to 145 degrees. Also, what about solar ovens? They slow cook without burning at about 200 degrees. I was wondering if poultry would be okay cooked solar. I’m hoping to gain weight on this diet, gain muscle and look younger. So far I have more energy and am sleeping less. I’m coming off of a macrobiotic healing diet.

    • Dave Asprey

      Don’t know St. Benoit, sorry! Slow cooking is good, but even properly fed poultry has bad oils and toxins that make them more yellow than green on the diet.

  • http://www.facebook.com/trevorxgage Trevor Fullbright

    Hey Dave,
    whenever you guys update for 2012 could you include a “Safe starch” section to give a better idea of starches to choose based on toxin levels?

    • Dave Asprey

      Yes, it’s already done but not posted yet!

      • Max Houtzager

        if your on the non low carb plan, should you stick with safe starches and bullet proof veggies as opposed to eating some of the less bulletproof veggies such as beets and mushrooms?

        • Dave Asprey

          Yes

          Sent from my nobile device’s tiny little keyboard

  • Wenchypoo

    Question: your protein strip says to eat grass-fed beef and lamb, but if you consult the NDB (nutrition database), these meats are quite high in Omega-6. What gives?

    Grass-fed beef, lamb, rabbit, and any other animal that you’d think of as grass-fed turns out to be Omega-6 hogs (both domestic and wild). Is fish the only real answer to this animal dilemma?

    Even olive oil, which is turning out to be one of the biggest food scams of the century, is loaded with Omega-6. Are we left with the sea AND NOTHING ELSE as the best sources of Omega-3–seaweed, algae, fish, seals, etc..possibly polar bears too?

    I know leafy green contain it, but you’d have to eat a pickup truck bed full of them to reach daily Omega-3 needs.

    Is it possible that we need to look at the quality of our grasses in pastureland, as well as the animals consuming it? Maybe the grasses themselves aren’t capable of being turned into Omega-3…I’m thinking a field full of rye grass, for example. Rye is a grain, and if cows and sheep munch on it all day, WE think they’re grass-fed, when actually, they’re being GRAIN-FED. It’s just immature grain, or “pre-harvested.”

    What is this inquiring housewife to do, besides load up on kale, sprouts, lettuces, algae supplements for her fish oil-allergic husband, and continue trying to find an olive oil that actually solidifies in the fridge?

  • Matty T

    Dave and Armi,

    In “The End of Illness,” Dr. David Agus recommends to “Buy frozen fruits and vegetables or “fresh flash-frozen” over what many supermarkets sell as just fresh.” He recommends the same for fish (for those of us a little farther from the coast) and even foods from farmers markets unless the it is in season and recently delivered. What’s your take?

    The book has so far been a good reminder to question common “knowledge” and take ownership of personal health. Something the bulletproof diet does in spades. Thanks for providing a great resource.

    Matt

  • Rezgs

    re: “Removing grains, legumes, and processed dairy produces greater insulin sensitivity in animals and humans. (6)(7)” – none of the links mentioned legumes. So, claim for removing legumes is not supported.

    • Dave Asprey

      Or not properly referenced! ;)

      • Alexander

        Again though, not that I disagree with the better nutrient quality of the paleo diet, it was done on individuals who where not lean and healthy, and also as you said protein was not matched, among other factors, how do you know if the grains where the problem?

        • Dave Asprey

          Overwhelming obviousness! Listen to our Wheat Belly podcast with Dr Davis for more info. ;)

        • Alexander

          I did, I am not stating that gluten and bastardized wheat is all good, rather that legumes and perhaps some other gluten free grain like things like Buckwheat cannot be part of an overall healthy diet, according to the evidence you referenced

    • http://armilegge.com Armistead Legge

      Both studies were on paleolithic diets, which involved removing grains, legumes, and dairy. One was on pigs, which is less relevant, but the other was on people with ischemic heart disease. Niether diet was matched for protein intake, which is a major confounder, but both diets removed legumes from the diet. The claim stands supported.

  • daz

    Where do you think Coconut Palm Sugar sits? Somewhere near Honey may be? From what i can tell is 70-79% sucrose. The nutritional profile looks quite good http://coconutpalmsugar.com/Nutritional_Information.html

  • Max Houtzager

    is raw skim milk ok (grass fed)?

    • Dave Asprey

      No. You want the fat!

      Sent from my nobile device’s tiny little keyboard

      • Max Houtzager

        but what if you have enough fat from other sources in your day already

  • Matt

    My friend just showed me this website and I just wanted to say thanks for doing this and I’m very excited to have this list to follow. I started Paleo about 1 month ago and feel great.

    Thanks for such valuable and free information.

  • charles

    your references you have posted often only apply to cancer patients, diabetics, etc… waiting for some done on “healthy” individuals

    • Jonathan Reilly

      Well, I guess as soon as Dave receives a few million bucks in funding he can conduct his own clinical trials and controlled longitudinal studies with thousands of subjects. Until such time as that occurs- we are *all* kind of stuck with the data that is available. If you have access to any additional information- I know I would personally love to devour it.

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  • Terry

    We want the update!!! :)

  • jet

    as a vegetarian who eats eggs milk cheese how should i approach this

  • zingbo

    wraps made from coconut meat, recommended by Dr. Jack Kruse:

    http://www.sunfood.com/pure-wraps-the-original-4-wraps-1-98-oz-raw-alkaline-gluten-free.html

    bulletproof, or mycotoxin risk?

  • Guest

    How come chicken and turkey isn’t that good? What about if it’s organic and hormone-free?

    • Dave Asprey

      Bad oils, mycotoxins from organic corn and soy feed, and it rarely sees the sun. Even very natural pastured chicken has a poor fatty acid ratio vs beef

  • Rebecca

    raw grain fed milk???? that is a recipe for disaster! grain feeding changed the pH value in the cow’s rumen making it ideal for e Coli. i would never recommend anyone drink raw milk from grain fed cows….

    • Dave Asprey

      Agreed. No grain fed milk even raw

  • Guest

    I know calorie counting isn’t really the key issue here, but do you have any advice on approximately how many calories a moderately active 25-year-old 5’6″ 145lb woman should eat while doing the bulletproof diet? I’ve always had trouble losing weight and have lost a bit on low-calorie diets but I have a feeling that some of that was muscle loss too which isn’t what I want.

    • Dave Asprey

      Eat until you’re full! Your calorie number will very enormously from the person next to you. Fat people need less calories to stay fat than thin people need to get fat. 50% of your burn is not from exercise. Use hunger, mental performance, and the mirror. ;)

  • Anonymous

    Dave & Armie,

    Thanks for the life-affirming work you are doing. I did Jack Kruse’s leptin reset to the letter for about 6 months and have been on the Bulletproof Diet now for about two months.

    This has been wonderful for my energy levels and has made my performance overall in every area of my life better, so thank you.

    This having been said, my experience differs from yours. I find that no matter how Bulletproof I eat, I MUST cut calories drastically, (to like 900 a day) if I want to lose body fat. If I eat in the 1200, or 1600, or 3000 range, or any other range above about 1000, I will maintain my weight and feel excellent, but I will not lose a single cell of body fat. I have been eating a super clean, strict diet for nearly two years, and experimenting with changing calorie amounts, and NOTHING works to cut body fat except severe restriction. But I hate severe restriction, because it takes the edge off my mental performance, even with Bulletproof coffee, sulfur veggies, coconut oil, enough sleep, etc, etc.

    Do you have any thoughts on why calorie restriction is the only thing that will work for me?

    As background info, when I count calories, I count them like a nazi and use a food scale, and so forth, and I know I am not miscounting.

    I am female, 5’8″, and weigh 138 pounds, but an unnaturally high percentage of these pounds are body fat, which is clearly visible when I look in the mirror. I am not anorexic and do not have body dismophic disorder, I can see and feel what is actually a large layer of excess fat on top of my musculature. My scale states that my body fat % is 29%, which based on how I look, is about accurate. My optimal healthy weight is about 125 or 127 lbs, at which my body fat is then maybe 20% or so, but I am just sick of having to do severe restriction to keep it that way… I do lift weights regularly btw.

    I never eat carbs, with the exception of green veggies and no more than about a half ounce of high quality dark chocolate per day. I do not overtrain, skip on sleep, etc.

    Please share your opinions as to why I am stuck with severe calorie restriction as my only option that works.

    • Anonymous

      I should add that I have been eating the Bulletproof Diet pretty much perfectly for over a year, too. (As you probably already know, Jack Kruse’s diet is like a subset of the Bulletproof Diet).

      • Claire

        Not sure if you’re still reading this but I just wanted to chime in and let you know that I know exactly where you’re coming from – I’m 5’8″, 150 pounds, and no matter what diet or how many calories I consume I can’t drop a single pound. I’ve eaten about 1000 – 1200 calories of paleo, bulletproof foods for months at a time, along with different forms of exercise and nothing works. I’ve also tried eating more, and that hasn’t helped. I fixed a thyroid issue a few years back and recently even saw an endocrinologist who prescribed metformin because he thought I was severely insulin resistant – but that didn’t work either. I’ve been in ketosis for several months in a row and nothing.
        I don’t really have anything helpful to say, but just want to mention – we’re out here!! There are other ladies who have all the dedication and commitment in the world and for whatever reason, our bodies simply will not let us lose weight. Like, I’m actually jealous of you for being able to drop some pounds when restricting so crazy severely.
        Anyway, good luck! Let us know if anything works.

    • Dave Asprey

      Yes – you shouldn’t stuff yourself with 5 sticks of butter and expect to lose weight. But most people on the BP diet can eat more calories than they can on the SAD and still lose weight…

      • Anyonymous

        Dave, thanks for your reply. I don’t quite understand your point, as I have not been stuffing myself or over-eating at all, by any stretch of the imagination. Although I agree that the SAD is complete crap compared to the BP, how do you explain the fact that a 5’8,” fit, relatively well-muscled, active person (me), can only lose weight on 900 or 850 calories a day. I had my thyroid hormone and my blood glucose levels tested by an endocrinologist and was told I was normal. Am I just a freak of nature?

        • Anyonymous

          I really respect your work Dave and I am a devoted fan of your podcast. I have to admit, I am disheartened by you and Zorica’s answers.

          I never eat beyond fullness, I definitely don’t eat anything near 5 sticks of butter, and I will even intermittent fast or skip meals if I am not hungry… I don’t “go crazy” with Bulletproof foods at all… I eat quite small portions and then feel full… (example – 3 ounces of grass-fed beef and 1 tbsp of grass-fed butter can sustain me for about 6 hours)… the problem is I will not loose body fat unless I cut to 900 calories a day.

          I don’t understand why my post is being responded to as if I pig out all the time. I am telling the truth.

        • Dave Asprey

          LOL, I wasn’t thinking you were “pigging out,” but some people think that because I did ~4,000 calories a day for 2 years and lost weight, they HAVE to do it to be Bulletproof. So verifying that you’re not making a mistake others have made is not a judgment on you.
          I wonder about your leptin levels.

        • Anonymous

          Dave – awesome, thanks for getting back to me! Hell no, I would never interpret your site as advising me to eat 4,000 calories day. :)

          You are male, probably taller than me, and contain more pounds more muscle than I do… that would be insane.

          Re leptin, I have read everything under the sun… Gary Taubes, “Good Calories, Bad Calories,” the book “Mastering Leptin,” Jack Kruse’s entire site. I’ve been searching for answers for years.

          Jack Kruse’s Leptin RX helped me tremendously, because it lowered my hunger pangs, which is evidence that my leptin levels went down… so now at least I can feel full and satisfied on about 1100 calories a day, which was not possible before.

          This having been said, despite years of research, reading, obsessively clean eating, timing eating with circadian rhythm, supplementing, etc, there is no way around the fact that if I pack on body fat like a freakin famine victim, and can’t loose weight unless I eat about 800 cals a day, which drives me crazy because it fracks with my mental performance.

          I look good on the outside, and no one would ever guess I have these problems… but I don’t want to be and look good, I want to be and look AWESOME, both mentally and physically. I don’t lack discipline, willpower, drive, or intelligence, but I cannot find answers anywhere.

          This morning I watched the sunset on my roof and contemplated my fate – I am going to have to be dulled in intelligence and energy for the next few months and eat 800 cals day if I want to cut this little 10 lb. layer of persistant fat hiding my awesome in-shape physique underneath. At present I have no other choice.

          Dave, any advice you have would be awesome. I am already supplementing as per the advice on your site… (krill, calcium, magnesium, etc, and have been for a couple years)…

          Anyone reading this have a similar experience? Please post!

        • Anonymous

          PS Sorry I erroneously concluded that you were judging me when you were not.

        • Dave Asprey

          No problem!

        • Guest

          Have you ever heard of Contact Reflex Analysis or Nutrition Response Testing? I have been seeing this form of practitioner for twenty years and it’s amazing what they can uncover by muscle testing your body. For instance, recently I started having symptoms of BOTH Diabetes and Hypoglycemia…I was so concerned that I went to see a Naturopathic doctor b/c I was unable to get an appt with my CRA Practitioner until a week later. In any case, she diagnosed me as Hypoglycemic and told me to stay off all carbs. Which was good advice but the heart racing and dizziness didn’t stop, I thought I wouldn’t be able to make it to my appt before having to go to the hospital I felt so bad. Fortunately I stuck it out and within minutes of testing me she found a severe overgrowth of Candida which can mimic the symptoms of many illnesses including diabetes and hypoglycemia. I found this website by googling mold in coffee b/c I saw a few sites for Candida to stay away from coffee b/c of mold which I had never heard of before. So here I am, ready to go bulletproof and Candida free ASAP. I shudder to think of what might have happened if I didn’t get the correct diagnosis (insulin, drugs, meds) I share this with you because maybe you have an underlying nutrition issue that can’t be found through “normal” testing.

        • Dave Asprey

          Oh, candida is a cause of weight gain and inflammation. Try this stuff right away and stay on it for a while. http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Undecylenic_acid

        • Dave Asprey

          There’s one other option I discussed in the interview for an upcoming podcast with Ashley Tudor, author of “Sweet Potato Power.” Women need some fat to remain fertile. Your bodies fight to maintain it unless there’s a famine. Models and athletic women on mag covers arent ripped; they’re gaunt and starved with some muscles showing through because of diuretics.
          Is it possible your “fat” body is actually the healthiest shape for you?

        • Zorica

          What if you don’t want to be fertile though? Can it be healthy enough to be slimmer if you don’t want to get pregnant and even ward off the chances of getting pregnant, or is it just plain unhealthy to be too slim/muscular? (Not talking about nasty anorexic looking…)

        • Dave Asprey

          Using excessive caloric restriction as birth control will hurt you epigenetically. Bad idea health wise!

        • Zorica

          Ok. Thanks. I don’t cut calories anyway, and I never count calories either, was just curious. I will make sure to not ruin my health.

        • TheJeebus

          Can this get any thinner?

      • Zorica

        People get silly sometimes…it’s about eating to when you feel full. Like you said, you don’t go around eating 5 sticks of butter on purpose if you don’t feel hungry anyway. That’s what I love about BP too!

  • Anon

    What about mackerel? It’s not on the list. If it’s Northern Atlantic mackerel, I’ve heard it’s much lower in mercury than king mackerel. Is it ok to eat?

  • Dualhammers

    How does one go about eating 20% of their calories in vegetables? My BMR is 3000 calories, that would be 600 calories of greens?

    • Dave Asprey

      Note the “50-70% fat” ?

      • Dualhammers

        Oh I did, but if the rest is vegetables and I want to get to 10-20% that is still 300-600 calories from vegetable matter, preferabbly greens.

        That would be like… 5-10lbs of bok choy a day.

        Would it be safe to say that just “A bunch of vegetables” is a good idea?

        • Dave Asprey

          “A bunch of” is very well put. It’s easier if you use the sweet potato option, which is only good for carb days…

  • Maxshralp

    Any suggestions on how to be bulletproof after or before binge eating?

    • Dave Asprey

      If you ate enough fat at the previous meal, binge eating should not be a prob!
      But charcoal and bentonite are good ideas.

  • Claire

    I just ordered some bovine colostrum (30% IgG). How much would you recommend using to get the maximum benefit?

    • Dave Asprey

      Without knowing more about how they make the stuff you got, it’s hard to try to safely provide advice or support for it. Ask the manufacturer?

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  • Jared

    Hi Dave, I love the site and have been drinking your coffee and trying to follow the diet. I am a little confused about what kind of meals to eat. You mention to cook low heat, but I hear you said in an interview that you sauteed steak in butter. How can you do that at low heat?

    Also, can you please give examples of a few days of typical meals? I am all set with breakfast and dinner (fish or meat), but I am not sure what to eat for lunch, especially since you said to not microwave. I’d really appreciate some example meals and would love to know a few things to eat if you aren’t at home.

  • Zack_Leman

    Are whole black pepper corns generally moldy or is it only preground pepercorns we have to worry about? Thank you.

    • Dave Asprey

      Sadly whole ones are a problem too.

      • Jason Goodwin

        Bummer. I like black pepper, and I’ve upped my intake recently as understand it helps with uptake of turmeric. So, two questions, have you read anything about cayenne and turmeric, or other methods of getting turmeric past the gut?

  • Sandy

    Hi my name is Sandy and I am 50 years old. I did the rapid fat-loss protocol for 5 days, but had to stop and move on to the regular bullet proof diet because I was always hungry and weak (maybe having something to do with my type 2 diabetes). I’ve been doing this for 5+ weeks now and am a little confused about my results. I lost 11 lbs the first week (including the 5 days of rflp), I lost nothing the second week, another 4 lbs the third week, gained back 5 lbs the fourth week, and have hit a plateau every since.

    Anyone have any thoughts as to the gain and the plateau? I have been following the diet very closely, staying on the green side of the diagram, and taking the supplements. Someone recommended eating 3 solid meals a day breakfast/lunch/dinner (at least 30 gr of protein each) with no snacking through out the day, as opposed to the intermittent fasting from 2-8. Not sure if that would help or not. Just trying to figure out how to keep motivating.

    Thanks.

  • g13day

    Time frame on update?

  • Anonymous

    (This is in response to your post about body image and fertility, but I am posting it in a new thread here because the site is doing this thing where it makes replies that are several levels down really narrow and tall and hard to read). I hope you can forgive the length of this post due to its probable relevance to millions of people.

    Dave,

    Thank you for compassionate and reasoned answer. I have considered the problem from your angle before as well.

    Based on my research, I don’t believe that my metabolism is optimal. For a 5’8,” 33 year old, fit, active person with conditioned lean muscle mass to be in a state where one’s basal metabolic rate is only 1300 calories a day just seems unhealthy in light of current scientific evidence.

    The above having been said, your answer is still very meaningful. In my experience, I feel better when my weight is down at 125 pounds. But if I maintain awareness very carefully, I can safely say that the feeling of “feeling better” is not located in my body, it is located in my mind. There are no physiological changes (e.g. temperature, energy levels, periods, etc) between my high and low weights, with the exception of sometimes being hungry at the low weight (to be expected; ghrelin).

    “Feeling better” is likely associated with a strong desire to be excellent in all respects, and to live life to its fullest, including being a fit, energetic, and aesthetically pleasing person. This is the bright aspect of the feeling. The dark aspect is the conditioning of Western Civilization that says that my value is located in my appearance, and not in the meaningful work that I do (BS of course). Throw on top of that the fact that I live in Manhattan, home of many other attractive and skinny women and numerous giant Abercrombie and Fitch posters. To top it off, I am married to a husband that likes models and strippers even more than the average straight male.

    So looking at what a truly healthy and energetic body actually IS relative to civilization-based conditioning is not a bad idea.

    I feel that it would be easier to simply take down every billboard of a gaunt female model and find every stripper and model in New York and convince them to eat cookies than it would be to gain enlightenment regarding my “fat” and accept that it is healthy, attractive, and life-sustaining.

    Dave, having once been 300 pounds and now being ripped and attractive, yet still possessing the same soul inside, you must have wisdom to share regarding this topic, so please… do so if inclined. The world is listening with rapt attention.

    Anonymous

    • Dave Asprey

      What an excellent question. Thanks for posing it so well.

      The bottom line is that while my soul inside may be the same as the one I had at 300 lbs, I’ve cleaned a lot of crap off of it that was clouding it up. Even if you get your physical body closer to what you feel is perfection, your “energetic body” (or psychology or emotions, or whatever you want to call that thing) will influence your physical body – both your perception of it and its physical form – and you won’t reach the “bulletproof” state that we all at some level know is possible.
      Put simply, body, mind, and spirit are not separate entities. If you want to radically reshape one, you’ll need to radically reshape them all, or your upgrade attempt will at best be sub-optimal or at worst fail outright. Case in point: people who lose 100lbs, then start eating wheat again and gain it all back. They got the body right; they had an undiagnosed weakness in mind or in spirit that led them to do the food equivalent of starting smoking.
      In my humble n=1 experience (but with a lot of help from very advanced knowledgeable people), the weakness is rarely in the mind. It’s in the spirit, because the mind is subject to the whims of the spirit, but the spirit is not as subject to the whims of the mind. And that pisses the mind off to no end, by the way.
      See my quantified self video where I talk about heart rate variability. Emotions (spirit as I’m calling them here) happen for no rational reason of the mind. They just happen. So when you get the feeling that you’re unattractive because you have curves larger than the average famine victim, that feeling doesn’t happen because your mind made it happen. It just happened. So cultivate the (meditation/Buddhist) practice of just watching it happen but not reacting to it. When you can note an emotion (or a negative feeling about your perfectly good body), acknowledge that it happened, but NOT respond by limiting your next meal or doing some crazy exercise, the feelings lose their power.
      You can do this work with a good spiritual or meditation teacher. It is hard and takes a long time. Transpersonal psychology is faster. Fastest of all is neurofeedback. (I’ve used all of those…)
      For you, I’m still wondering. Are your mitochondria working well? Seems like learning Jack Kruse’s cold thermogenesis techniques might be awesome for you. Soaking in an ice bath seems extreme, but it feels great once you get used to doing it, and it dramatically raises your metabolism. Some PQQ might be a good idea too (supplement).

      • BIzzy

        Dave…everything seems reasonably solid but I am concerned that someone suggested you are supplementing with Testosterone..is that true?….if you are you are advancing your heart disease at a catastrophic rate..terrific study in the Journal of Preventive Cardiology proves it by EBCT coronary scans of YOUNG roiding bodybuilders with arterial profiles of 70 year old men..plaque buildup is shocking…await your response

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  • Maxshralp
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  • Zack_Leman

    How much of a specific antioxidant should be used on a piece of meat that will be cooked in a way that could produce nitrosamines? What antioxidant is best for this? Thanks

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  • Ben

    Dave
    I am trying to follow the BP diet. Got my first shipment of grass fed beef. I like it, but I realized that my favorite marinade, beer is probably not bp. Am I wrong?
    Also You may have mentioned it but what about soaking the meat in salt water (obliviously sea salt) be for cooking.
    Ben

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  • http://prepperyogini.blogspot.in/ Prepper Yogini

    Really interesting stuff, thank you!

  • http://twitter.com/IanThinkRunning Ian McMillan

    Hi, I’m new to this but have already started to see results. Basically I cut all wheat and grain from my diet and starchy stuff like potatoes. Is that about right?

    Oh and despite signing up on the email list I don’t see any emails?

    I have a few questions though.

    How many eggs can you eat in a week?
    Is it right to focus on meat/protein first then think of some veg

    I’d be interested to see some sample diets, as I’m new and just keep eating the same stuff!

    I eat plenty of butter, avoid low fat alternatives and eat liver, kidney etc. Does this sound about right?

    I’d be grateful for any advice.

    Cheers, Ian

    • Anna

      I’m wondering if you’re having coffee with butter and coconut oil in the morning?!

  • Sherrie

    So… seriously? Brussel sprouts laden with ghee? Have I died and gone to heaven?

    • Dave Asprey

      Double blind clinical trials prove heaven is totally lined with ghee, with separate sections for Brussels sprouts, chocolate, and bacon! ;)

  • Zack_Leman

    The Lindt chocolate I have bought in the US says it is made in New Hampshire. Is this US made chocolate still held to European mycotoxin standards or would it not be regulated as tightly?

    • Dave Asprey

      Not sure; I imagine it’s the same European source but packaged in the US.

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  • memria

    Is raw goat milk an okay substitute if I cant find raw cows milk anywhere? I think they are on a hay and some kind of lettuce diet.

  • Kali

    I like the diet and enjoy eating red meat but what about the research that indicates that Neu5Gc found in red meat can increase inflammation and possibly cancer: http://health.ucsd.edu/news/2003/09_29_varki.html

    Hopefully someone can set me straight and allay any fears I have when I dig into some grass fed beef.

    • Dave Asprey

      Quoting the study:
      “The authors cautioned that a causal relationship between Neu5Gc expression in human tissues with any human disease would be premature and scientifically speculative at best. Instead, they said their findings point to the need for population-level analyses of the presence of Neu5Gc in human tissues in relationship to disease incidence, and the mechanisms of human incorporation and antibody response against this sugar.”
      I am not significantly concerned about this.

      • http://profile.yahoo.com/O4IHXP4QGAFVWTF3EDLQXNOLPM Thomas

        Check this link for research on the Okinawa diet – some of these people lived until 110 years old – plant-based and extremely low-fat, high-carb:
        http://okicent.org/docs/anyas_cr_diet_2007_1114_434s.pdf

        According to wikipedia, their carb:protein:fat ratio is 85%: 9%:6%, respectively, and the Okinawa generally live well into their centurian phase of life.

        The literature on plant-based, low-fat diet health and longevity long-term “bullet-proofing” effects far outweigh the handful of research cited supporting the diet recommended here.
        However, that being said, CR is extremely difficult to follow and does not give an edge where performance is generally concerned, as does the upgraded paleo BP. So it’s a tradeoff here.

        I came here to possibly tweak CR, but it’s all unchartered territory. Diet is cool, but like Ray Kurzweil, I’m trying to stay alive long enough to live well forever, and the insanely high cholesterol and fat in the diet mentioned here may cut life short before we get the drugs and treatment that will come out of anti-aging and gerontology research. BTW, quite a few people in the forums on this website have doubled cholesterol and triglycerides after following BP, and others went up significantly in ill-health related biomarkers.

        Thanks for the website; it is thorough and provides a fresh perspective on some cool biohacks.

        • Zorica

          They tend to eat one meal at the end of the day. They enter ketosis the rest of the time. They are using fat for fuel despite what their outside diet looks like.

        • http://profile.yahoo.com/O4IHXP4QGAFVWTF3EDLQXNOLPM Thomas

          Who is the “they” you are referring too? BP diet maybe; not CR or Okinawa. Okinawa diet is over 50% sweet potato, and most of the CR’s I know eat three times a day.

          A lot of the info from Dave and his researchers here is cool no doubt but the diet recommendations are *not* the way to go for a person looking to upgrade their max and mean lifespan and to *disease-proof* themselves. It’s not debatable – I simply feel obligated to post this here so people seeking *truth* are not mislead.

        • Dave Asprey

          Thomas, we will have to respectfully disagree here. I run an anti-aging nonprofit group and met my wife at an A4M meeting. My diet handles glucose, glycosylation, autophagy, (probably) telomerase, endotoxins, excitotoxins, and most importantly, inflammation.

        • Dave Asprey

          Thomas, look at the effects of cholesterol sulfate on your health. A low cholesterol diet is not going to help you age well! Cholesterol makes your hormones. Cholesterol binds to toxins so you can excrete them well!

        • Jason Goodwin

          There may be some merit to the study, I haven’t read it fully, but it seems like you’ve already closed your mind to alternative explanations. Given the wide range of lifestyles in long lived people (smoking, alcohol, meat, no meat) there’s clearly a lot to be learned, and most likely severe limitations in the studies on human longevity that leave room for a multitude of explanations. The first thing I noticed was that the nutrition data you cite was from 1949. It’s not even clear if the same people are involved in the drawing the blood levels of DHEA in the late 80′s.

          A plausible explanation (assuming the diet stats are correct) is hinted at by Zorica, below. If you are eating less than what you are expending, it doesn’t really matter if you are eating once or twice or 3 times per day, you’ll be in ketosis for some period of time, until however your metabolism slows to approach energy intake.

          Also plausible is that blood sugar levels and inflammation are far more important in the big picture. I believe I have read elsewhere that CR tends to limit both, even in the presence of high carb (no wheat) consumption.

          Check out longevity and disease in the Inuit (almost 100% meat/fish/fat), or the Hunza (some real wheat, some meat, shload of butter, or the Masai (meat, milk, milk fats), for a quick primer into the range of diets in very healthy populations.

          Also, as Dave notes, there is zero correlation between total cholesterol and heart disease. This is a myth perpetuated by agribusiness funded researchers unwilling to accept and incorporate new research. The type of cholesterol, oxidation, and glycation are much more relevant to disease. Get a heart scan if you’re worried about plaque, just don’t confuse the two.

  • Zack_Leman

    What are your thoughts on yacon syrup which is 50% fructooligosacharides? Would this be on the green side?

    • Dave Asprey

      If you don’t have SIBO and don’t have a lot of gas, it’s probably ok. Depends on what grows in your gut.

  • Cassandra_sheppard

    hi Dave im new to this diet and was wondering if there is a pre prepared shopping list for us newbies so to speak.

    • Dave Asprey

      Look in the biohacker toolbox!

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  • Mcnam003

    Why are mushrooms as bad as potatoes?

    • http://profile.yahoo.com/O4IHXP4QGAFVWTF3EDLQXNOLPM Thomas

      fungus

  • Mcnam003

    and whats bad about black pepper and nutmeg?

    • Dave Asprey

      Mycotoxin.

  • http://twitter.com/thomaseschp Thomas Esch

    Hasn’t calorie restriction been the only proven life and health extension diet regimen? Is this diet here for performance or longevity? I think there’s a tradeoff between the two

    I don’t understand here how the things Dave’s researched and the recommendations here could be healthy in general and esp. for a person’s cardiovascular system. I recall reading Dean Ornish reversed heart disease in some patients using <10% total fat calorie diet.

    Wouldn't the diet above wreak havok on a person's heart and arteries?
    Is this even recommend or doable for a person with predisposition to heart disease?

    This diet would be way cooler than CR, but seems like it doesn't have the same benefits as CR. Ironically, I'm on my way now to get some grass-fed butter, because the CR diet doesn't improve performance in any way for me, and I'm looking to upgrade my performance mentally and physically.

    I'll report back my results in a week or so.

    Thanks for the interesting website!

    • Dave Asprey

      CR is not a good idea; I’ve seen it cause huge amounts of damage to very smart people. Thyroid problems, inability to gain weight, etc. Try using Upgraded Aging and pterostilbene and metformin if you want the benefits of CR without the pain and significant drawbacks.

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/O4IHXP4QGAFVWTF3EDLQXNOLPM Thomas

    http://okicent.org/docs/anyas_cr_diet_2007_1114_434s.pdf

    CR is the way to go.
    The dietary recommendations made on this website are bogus as far as optimal health and longevity are concerned.

  • Anon125

    Anyone have the specifics on Ray Kurzweil’s diet regimen?

    • Dave Asprey

      It’s in his book, but the man does not understand fatty acids very well. Cool guy though…

  • Zack_Leman

    What are your thoughts on canned fish? (Specifically tuna and salmon) Are the oils oxidized or is there a high histamine content?

    • Dave Asprey

      Mercury in tuna makes it bad news. Canned sockeye has some bpa and is fully cooked but it’s better than most canned foods. Good for earthquakes and famines.

  • Zack_Leman

    What do you think about eating in season in terms of having fruits and tubers in spring and summer but not the fall and winter? Should we consume fewer carbs in the winter? Should carb refeed days after winter workous contain less carbs?

    • Dave Asprey

      Agree with all.

  • Candice

    Dave,

    How do I get 20% of my calories from
    vegetables without eating potatoes? I really don’t do well on less that ~75g of carbs per day, and with keeping fructose less than 15g per day, limiting coconut sugar, honey, berries, how does one attain that? 50g of carbs is a big head of cabbage every day… That seems like a lot. Why are sweet potatoes in the red and yet the recent ode to them in the book review? I tried to switch to this from reg paleo but seem to need my 75-100g of carbs, ended up using fructose

    • Candice

      By that I mean inadvertently started using berries and honey for my
      Carbs since in this graphic they’re both green. But fructose makes me feel gross

  • Kms53

    Do you make a distinction between commercially-available flax oil, and the oil contained in freshly-ground flax seed? I have been grinding my own flax seed, as ALA is supposed to be good for my gallbladder (I decided not to have my gallbladder removed after a gallbladder attack 13 months ago, treating with flax, soy lecithin, and magnesium supplements instead. I eat fats without discomfort now, other than occasional mild pressure.).

    I add the ground flax seed to hot water and drink it. For the past couple of days, I have been adding coconut oil and/or butter to it, since I’m not a coffee-drinker. It has helped me get back into ketosis, which I appreciate. I am hoping for feedback on whether there is a better option.

  • Matthew R

    Hi Dave and Armi, my wife is vegetarian and I am vegecarian (will eat meat if ethically treated) and so while very interested in the paleo diet I’m always looking for ways of replacing meat protein. What are your thoughts on taking spirulina to supplement protein?

    • Dave Asprey

      It’s not about replacing the protein – it’s about replacing the fat as much as the protein.

  • http://twitter.com/ysabet elspeth

    Hm, well, I don’t eat grains (except there’s some in my gluten free gravy powder, which I’m going to change once I finish the box), and I’m dairy intolerant. I’m sensitive to sugar – I get highs and hangovers from even small amounts of honey, and fructose doesn’t bear thinking about. I don’t eat much in the way of legumes or beans, since I find they interfere with my digestion, and soy in particular is right out (family history of thyroid disorders).

    Potatoes are my main source of carbohydrate at present. I get organic, preferably locally grown potatoes, and peel them thoroughly before cooking (either boiling for mashing, or roasting, generally). I’m not sensitive to nightshades in general, which is nice, since tomatoes and bell peppers also make regular appearances in my diet.

    Dropping potatoes, I end up eating perhaps 20g of carbohydrate a day. I’ve tried to eat more than 100g of protein a day, but my appetite shuts down utterly at about 80g a day (forcing myself to eat leads to throwing up or intense nausea). I get some carbohydrate from brassicas (broccoli, cabbage, radishes, cauliflower), alliums (onions, leeks, garlic) and nuts (macadamia nuts are the bomb, and raw almond butter is also awesome). Still, these are all relatively high-volume low-calories foods (except the nuts), which poses a distinct problem to a slack appetite.

    I make liberal use of duck fat, macadamia and olive oils in cooking – although the EVOO doesn’t get pulled out if it’s likely to get exposed to high temperatures. Still, there’s only so much fat I can add in any given meal.

    I will admit up front I’m a bit of a picky eater, and it gets worse as I get hungrier. This is currently a problem, because I am trying to eat above 1200 calories a day. I don’t advocate calorie restriction; I’m desperately trying to eat more (and failing miserably). Any suggestions?

    • Dave Asprey

      I’m concerned about the gravy powder. That’s MSG city! If you eat that, what other toxins are messing with you? I’d try activated charcoal for a few days and see if your appetite improves.

  • Guest

    I have recently begun converting my nutrition from zone to bulletproof. Here in Cyprus it’s quite hot now and after bulletproof meals despite reaching satiety i have a desire for sugary foods such as fruits. What is a better way of eliminating sugar cravngs and staying more disciplined on the Bulletproof Nutrition?

    • Dave Asprey

      Try eating a higher amount of fat with the meals, or going beyond satiety…I find the BP diet makes me very much more heat tolerant.

      • Guest

        Thanks Dave. I have been following a tailored Zone Nutrition for 2 years and brought my body fat to 10%. During those years i also felt sleepy especially during lectures, before and around lunchtime and the nutrition involved lots of fruits at every meal. Moreover despite all the other benefits i still had and have excess chest fat at that low body fat percentage. A doctor once said it is a minor case of gynecomastia. Other than following the BP nutrition and training what other steps do you advise to change this situation once and for all?

        • Dave Asprey

          Um, wear a bro? ? There is ultrasound for subcutaneous fat destruction, but I wouldn’t do it. Thankfully, my man-boobs shrank when I lost the 100lbs. Don’t have much else for you, sorry. ?

        • Guest

          Haha :p

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  • Itsmee

    The PDF version of the diet sent to me by email says Version 1.1, but the version above in this article says Version 2. ANy chance you have the pdf of the most recent version?

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  • Jack Portman

    Question about Turmeric. It’s a powerful toxin fighter once ingested, but is it susceptible to Mycotoxins during storage? I have developed a great taste for it and can almost cook anything with it, but is it possible for it to actually become inflammatory?

    • alexschindler

      wouldn’t worry too mucha bout mycotoxins. that’s just Bulletproof Bullshit to sell coffee.

      • Barchiel

        LMAO NICE ONE

      • Chloe Blue

        Here are some REAL scams:

        Villains in the banking industry who are destroying people’s lives, without consequence.

        Villains overseeing countless corporations who enlist the slave labor of children to make their billions, without consequence….lives are destroyed.

        Billionaires who run big pharma and cause the DEATHS of 200,000+ each and every year, without consequence.

        The psychiatric/medical industry poisons the brains of innocent people to the point of no return, without consequences.

        The government war mongers spend billions each and every year to support evil military regimes overseas.

        Just a few “scams” off the top of my head.

        They’re evil and would deserve your contempt.

        Alternatively, the creator of this site has EVERY right to develop himself financially, share his experiences, and make an honest, abundant living.

    • gmeades

      Are you worried about your Tumeric becoming moldy? Just buy some fresh Tumeric… problem solved.

      A mycotoxin (from Greek (mykes, mukos) “fungus” and (toxikon) “poison”) is a toxic secondary metabolite produced by organisms of the fungi kingdom, commonly known as molds. The term ‘mycotoxin’ is usually reserved for the toxic chemical products produced by fungi that readily colonize crops. One mold species may produce many different mycotoxins, and the same mycotoxin may be produced by several species.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mycotoxin

  • Mia

    Thanks a lot for this! I love the accessible, graphic illustrations.
    The circle with the distribution of calories – what would that look like if it was a plate? How would greens, proteins, oils be distributed in “real life form”? That is an easier way for me to understand a diet, not having to count calories :) Would be very grateful for a suggestion! :)

  • Pqrs

    Hi,

    First of all, I am surprised to see the info here! But I am also keen to give this a shot and find out for myself.

    Only thing is I am a vegetarian. What can I substitute for all the stuff on the Proteins list?

    Maybe someone’s already asked this … But thanks for any help all the same!

  • Mher88

    Dave I posted a message in the Bulletproof forum about my current nutritional structure
    http://forum.bulletproofexec.com/index.php?/topic/660-zone-to-bulletproof/
    I am more interested also in hearing your view too.

  • Mia

    Thanks a lot for this!

    What would an image of a plate look like with regards to the distribution of proteins, greens, oils…

    For me that is the easiest way to understand/follow diet recommendations – not having to count calories! :)

    Does green juice have a place on the bulletproof diet? If so when is the best time to consume it? (Does it raise insulin?)

    Thanks again! :)

  • http://www.facebook.com/tom.chadwick.35 Tom Chadwick

    What do I do for breakfast if I don’t like coffee?

  • Zack_Leman

    If I want to make my own ghee with kerry gold, what is the maximum temperature I should allow when heating it to prevent oils from oxidizing?

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  • http://profile.yahoo.com/O4IHXP4QGAFVWTF3EDLQXNOLPM Thomas

    Check out http://www.bluezones.com/
    The world’s longest living people *rarely* eat meat or fish. Thank God I didn’t stop here on my quest for a longevity diet, because I would have kept on destroying myself with grass-fed butter and beef. No offense to anyone on here, but after coming across the “bluezones” diet plan (not just one, but many) I think the BP diet is totally insane and a major risk to people’s health in light of the commonality shared between the longest lived people.

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  • Chris

    Dave,

    I was wondering where you stand with regard to soaking nuts vs. eating them raw without soaking them. Nuts are such a convenient snack to have when traveling, but not if they have to be soaked in order to be healthy.

  • Staci Senatore

    I use half and half and splenda in my coffe. What can I use with the bullet proof coffee and does it taste good?

  • Hilary

    how about juicing AND do you make a protein shake?

  • Hilary

    can coconut oil be used in place of MCT oil in coffee?

  • tyler1010

    can coconut oil be used in place of MCT oil in coffee

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  • Oyo

    ‘Cereal grains contribute to nutrient deficiencies’??? That’s NOT what the paper says.

  • Oyo

    ‘Brown rice (not white) prevents protein digestion ‘ : again, that’s not what the paper says. It REDUCES protein digestion, and the study was conducted on the basis of an already low-protein diet……..
    -_- -_- -_- -_-

  • Kennethnaylor

    How about full fat cottage cheese? Same as other cheeses?

  • tjr

    What’s wrong with microwaving?

    • Sudevi

      Microwaving makes your food basically no longer food.

      • Ash

        You mind linking that? Can’t find it on PubMed.

  • RAFritchey

    A couple of questions and a comment:

    In the comments, someone refers to the ‘Alcohol infographic.’ Is this still around, yet to be posted, or part of an old version?

    Why is Garlic listed so ‘neutrally?’ I’ve seen a LOT of information that would seem to make it as beneficial as ginger, turmeric, or other spices.

    Comment: You might want to put an asterisk by tomatoes, eggplant, ‘white’ potatoes and peppers (Bell and spicy peppers) since they are members of the nightshade family. Some people can do just fine with them, but others react to their alkaloids. I understand they can be particularly bed for people with arthritis. People might want to experiment with these foods and judge for themselves.

    Thanks!

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  • PardonMe

    Table salt is NOT pure sodium. Sodium is a metal, table salt is a salt, sodium chloride.

  • Sudevi

    Is is possible to do this diet being a lact-vegetarian?

  • Sudevi

    What about seeds? (raw & sprouted) Nutritional yeast?

    • Dave Asprey

      Yeast is way bad…MSG and allergens.

      • Sudevi

        My understanding is that it contains the amino acid glutamate.
        While glutamate is in msg, it’s not the same.

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  • Joey Chang

    Hi Dave I’m having a bit of trouble sourcing why you think stevia & xylitol are the best sugar sweeteners, considering xylitol is a sugar alcohol & the research on stevia is preliminary (plus not providing any energy, as you said). Would you do me a biggie & link me to your reasoning?

    btw, ctrl+f only hi-lights & doesn’t actually scroll to the result in disqus. I’m using chrome.

  • http://www.facebook.com/dawn.strohm Dawn Ryan Strohm

    Dave, I am a 52 year old female who is in good physical shape, but I have ten pounds that I have really been struggling with. I started the diet two weeks ago, doing intermittent fasting and eating only on the green side of the spectrum. Even ordered some of the coffee! Yet I have not lost a single pound. Very frustrating!!! Any thoughts on why this might happen.

  • Paul

    Best way to use/consume apple cider vinegar? Just mix a little in a large glass of water and drink?

    • http://www.facebook.com/kyle.hofmeister.1 Kyle Hofmeister

      If you like the taste of it you could throw it over a salad with some MCT oil like I do. Tastes good and good for you. If you don’t like the taste of it simple don’t use it. It’s not required on this diet. Hope this helps. :)

  • http://www.facebook.com/dawn.strohm Dawn Ryan Strohm

    For some reason my comment about not losing any weight on this diet was deleted! …..mmm!

    • Dave Asprey

      No way. I do not delete comments except spam. There are lots of critical comments; I leave them all. Repost it…maybe a browser issue?
      Sent from my nobile device’s tiny little keyboard

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  • Brian Cockburn

    Question about sugar: where would Panela be on the sweetener spectrum?
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Panela

    Since it’s unrefined whole cane sugar I’m guessing it would end up somewhere in the middle with coconut sugar, maple syrup, and raw honey. What are your thoughts?

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  • http://www.facebook.com/ian.greenlee Ian Greenlee

    There is no way I can afford this diet, I’m broke :-( If I can’t afford all the organic unpasteurized dairy and grassfed meats must I avoid it all?

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  • Danielle

    where do sesame seeds fall on here?

  • http://www.facebook.com/kyle.hofmeister.1 Kyle Hofmeister

    Will Sweet Potatoes being moving down anytime soon? After listening to the sweet potato podcast I’m curious in them.
    Thanks!

  • Casey

    This makes no sense. All your advice has us limiting high calorie foods that can be eaten raw(bananas ect) But then you’re recommending that we eat more raw and less cooked at the end. Do you want the focus of our diet to be raw nuts and avocado’s? Pufa festival?

    • Michael A

      I think you are forgetting raw and lightly cooked vegetables. Think celery, carrots, cucumbers (technically a fruit), lettuce, etc. Otherwise you make a good point.

      There are also fruits. I happen to not agree with Dave on some of his fruit suggestions, such as putting blueberries, strawberries, and grapes at medium to low. Sure they have a decent amount of sugar but the fiber helps to blunt the blood sugar spike and they are loaded with natural antioxidants and vitamins. The vast majority of the paleo community says ALL fruits are fair game though the paleo community also does not suggest you 4000 calories a day.

  • http://www.facebook.com/martin.anderson.980 Martin Anderson
    • Dave Asprey

      Total BS. Green destroys soil and tractors kill more field animals than die on the BP diet! ;)
      Sent from an iphone. That means it’s spelled wrong…and I’m probably lost. You understand… -Dave

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  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Bryahn-Justine/10808527 Bryahn Justine

    I’ve been reading so much on your site lately and have been grain free for all of October so far, I’ve done Paleo in the past and my problem is that I was brought up completely vegetarian, I have NEVER eaten red meat and have only started to eat poultry & fish about a year ago, and still don’t love it, but I want to be as healthy as possible – I have inflammation signs already at 24 years old – So do you have any recommendations for me? I’m not sure if I could work my way to meat or not, I have pastured eggs and organic full fat greek yogurt everyday, chicken some days, etc. Thanks!

    • Dave Asprey

      Well…red meat kills far fewer animals than chicken does! Dies that help?
      Sent from my nobile phone. You understand….

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  • john

    where can you buy fresh meat?

  • Christian Gehrke

    I love pickles. I know they can be high in salt so I try not to eat too many.

    I see cucumbers in the list of good veggies but what about pickled veggies?

    • Dave Asprey

      Don’t worry about salt. Watch for sugar preservatives MSG though!

      Sent from an iphone. That means it’s spelled wrong…and I’m probably lost. You understand… -Dave

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  • Kevin Tran

    Hey Dave, I learned about you from the Joe Rogan Experience. I like your system and I’m going to try it. One question, if I try your diet and like it will it still work when I get older? Like 70 years old? Or will I eventually get fat?

    • Dave Asprey

      It appears to work for all ages!

      Sent from an iphone. That means it’s spelled wrong…and I’m probably lost. You understand… -Dave

    • Dave Asprey

      It appears to work for all ages!

      Sent from an iphone. That means it’s spelled wrong…and I’m probably lost. You understand… -Dave

  • Kooolout

    Dave I love this sight but where are the fat pics of you. Most people who loose over 100 lbs have before pics. Where are those? Might helpSigned a born skeptic… also a man who can’t seem to stick with paleo damn that bread and pasta

    • Dave Asprey

      Did you see the one published in Entrepreneur Magazine when I was 22? Look at the “it’s real” page here too.
      You’d be surprised but fat people often don’t like having their picture taken.
      Sent from my nobile phone. You understand….

      • Kooolout

        my bad… i did not mean to be a smart ass in anyway. I all ready bought the book. Heard you on the joe rogan experience you sounds super smart. I am just a skeptic cause I haven’t been able to hack any smarts or weight loss…yet

  • Howard

    I’m a big fan but recently I’ve read some work from Dr. Mark Hyman. He’s been arguing that coffee’s bad for you and has some good points but now I’m a bit on the fence after drinking coffee for 20yrs.

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  • Lets Evolve Together

    thanks to the Joe Rogan show, i have been shown the light at the end of the tunnel..once more again!

  • Jane m

    Is there a limit to the amount of the grass fed butter you can eat?

  • JourneyMan

    Dave,
    Took in some grass-fed cow’s milk butter last night for the first time ever and feel awesome this morning–woke up an entire hour before the alarm.
    In researching the diet further as I am integrating it as we speak, I have a couple questions:
    1. Why are mushrooms a no-go?
    2. Why are sweet-potatoes a no-go?
    Thanks

  • http://www.facebook.com/teri.jones.984 Teri Jones

    I have epilepsy and suspect leaky gut, I healed my so called fibromyalgia at 20 years old by eliminated MSG, I’ve had A stimulator implanted, it electrocuted me, the next year I had brain surgery, after a honeymoon period and a second pregnancy the seizures came back, I’m getting great results using the Edgar Cayce remedies, which recommends beef juice but not the flesh, it seems when I cheat and eat good meat I end up seizing, what’s a girl to do? Thanks. Teri

  • http://twitter.com/CazSchiller Caz

    Hey Dave, what type of peanut butter would you recommend? I know you don’t like it, but if you could? Trying to ween myself off.

    • Mohsen

      My suggestion would be to lower your intake and find organic and high quality peanut butter from a health food store and then possibly transfer to almond butter!

  • Stigmaphobia

    Absolutely love this site. Your information is bulletproof and checks out on all levels. The inner skeptic in me still has this primal urge to call it bullshit since you write like those ” LOSE FAT QUICK!!!!!!!!1!!1″ scam artists, but after finding tons of articles backing up the claims on the site, I’m sold. I have a history of long-ish stretches of having no energy and being super fucking cranky, and this is the first plan that’s given me hope. Thanks for that.

    Getting BP coffee the moment I have spare money.

    • Dave Asprey

      Thank you!

      I’m not really selling anything you MUST have to lose weight fast. It’s all free on the site, just information. The coffee and MCT are major accelerators, but the info is the key! :0

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  • Mohsen

    What do you think about goat meat?

  • Lionne

    Can you suggest in grams the ideal ratio for fats, protein, carbs for a female trying to lose weight

  • Allarie

    Hey Dave! I see you have Tilapia on the high end of the “eat” section. I know that it is low in mercury but around here I only see farm raised Tilapia for purchase, even at Whole Foods. Are you referring to wild Tilapia when you say it’s good to eat? If so, can I order this somewhere and is it only available during specific months? Thank you for your input :)

    Allarie

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  • hicksey14

    Dave,
    do you have any other recommendations for healthy fat sources in addition to the ones in the infographic, as I have intolerance to many of these (avocado, cocount, and egg) for various reasons, despite me nearly bulletproofing my diet. Brain function much better by the way. I find myself eating tons of dark chocolate as a result, which can lead to headaches eaten so frequently. Just wondering what other sources there are besides butter to keep me eating enough calories and fat to sustain this great new metabolism. Thanks Dave.

  • Justin Newman

    I couldn’t find any raw milk. Only pasturized organic. Any thoughts on the CDC’s stance on raw milk linked to disease?

    http://www.cdc.gov/Features/RawMilk/

    • Michael A

      IF American raw milk causes disease it is because of factory farming. Most cows (including organic milk cows) are fed terrible diets and attached to machines that milk their utters. The combination causes wounds on the cows and the cramped layout of factory farms allows puss, feces, and urine to get into the milk.

      Grass-fed, farm-raised milk cows do not have these problems. In Europe raw milk and raw milk products are ALL considered legal and safe – see here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raw_milk#Europe.

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  • lps19

    I listened to your podcast with joe rogan very eye opening , i am just wondering a couple things where u get your cow beef online that can be trusted and also if you are saying that to gain muscle we should work out less or that we have to make sure we have our recovery days? other then that thanks for all the awesome info

  • Mirekchicago

    Dave. I would love to find out the answer to question below, about mycotoxins and turmeric.

  • Bruce Kaster

    is there decaf bullett proof coffee? thanks Bruce

  • Naomi M.

    I am assuming we shouldn’t use the following foods (coconut sugar, coconut flour, almond flour, almond milk, chicken/beef broth) because they weren’t on the list, but I am wondering why they are harmful…any info on those?

    • Christos

      I believe all of those are ok, as they are from coconut and almonds, except coconut sugar. Fructose is fructose.
      Beef broth is good too !

      • Naomi M.

        Thanks for your reply @f499093c7db82b4d8b0b56f54b95af8a:disqus . Was that information from his website, or a book? I’d like to know where, so I can read more about it. Thanks!

  • Jonny

    I’ve put in my email at least three times, and still have not received the PDF version. What am I doing wrong?

    • http://www.facebook.com/caitlin.gaither Caitlin Gaither

      mine was sent to junk mail box

  • http://twitter.com/renegadedad Tim Murphy

    Dave, why “cooked” spinach vs raw? To reduce oxalates?

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  • AUSSIE

    Hi dave
    I am very interested in trying this diet for its health, well being and cognitive function benefits. My one worry about starting this diet is that i weight train quite seriously and do not want to lose any of my strength and muscle gains i have made over the last few years. so basically I am asking what tweaks you would recommend i make to this diet for optimal performance in strength training and muscle maintenance. Thanks for the awesome and inspiring articles and podcasts

    • Dave Asprey

      You will want to add rice every 3-7 days for dinner.

      Sent from my nobile phone. You understand….

  • http://www.facebook.com/LoisWStern Lois Wolf Stern

    my son & I started on our journey towards becoming bulletproof. Baby steps, but trying. Still feeling out how much of the food we make [using recipes from your book] are an adequate amount for lunch and dinner. We tend to make dinner & then use the leftovers for lunch. I’ve enjoyed a loaf w/a soup for dinner to get in the extra veggies… braised dishes are nice, but lighter and the lamb chili was more like a soup and needs thickening somehow] … YOUR THOUGHTS? :-) thanks

  • Melauer

    I am curious on thoughts about cookware. I’ve read about aluminum and hard anodized and non stick realted health issues. Any recomendations for cookware that would be used daily?

    • upperbobby

      After researching all the info on this website and elsewhere, it seems enamel coated steel is the best and safest. Expensive and hard to find though…

  • jon Nguyen

    I heard on the Joe rogan podcast that you buy grass fed beef in bulk. Do you have any links?

  • franquizzle

    Dave,
    I followed the tim ferris ‘slow carb diet’ for over a year and lost alot of weight. However he emphasized eating a lot of legumes. I like and agree with the b.p. diet, but I don’t understand the scale showing beans to be negative. Can you explain?

    • Michael A

      There are compounds in beans that cause intestinal distress in most individuals. They are called lectins and are responsible for the gas that beans cause. Most people in the paleo community suggest soaking beans to help remove lectins if you choose to eat them.

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  • James

    What about pure 100 percent dark chocolate

    • Michael A

      I’m sure Dave would say that as long as your chocolate is low mycotoxin, it is a-ok to eat. He would probably suggest Bulletproof chocolate but it is overpriced.

  • Steve

    So do you just not eat bread?

  • Rick

    I’ve been on the Bulletproof diet for about three weeks now ( since i’ve listened to Dave on the Joe Rogan Experience ) and since then I feel extremely good. My girlfriend and my roommate think I’m crazy though when I blend my grass fed butter, MCT oil and coffee together in the morning. People here in The Netherlands are indoctrinated to think all saturated fat is bad for you. I hope this will change in the near future.

    • Michael A

      People here in the US have the same false beliefs!

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  • Lee in VA

    tried to find info on leeks but was not successful- they are not listed on your foods lists- do they fall into the same category as onions and garlic or are leeks, hopefully, a little more to the left? thanks for your help

    Lee in VA

    • upperbobby

      Leeks are in a bunch of the recipes in Dave’s cookbook so I would say they are bulletproof! Which is great because they are delicious!

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  • upperbobby

    Can’t thank you enough for all this information! The only trouble I’m having is understanding a few of the changes in green zone veggies from the old version to the new. What’s the verdict on cooked kale, spinach, etc vs. raw? What of Swiss chard? Lastly, some of the recipes in the cookbook contain not-so-green-zone items like oranges and sesame oil. Are the amounts used in the recipes small enough to not make a difference, or would you take this opportunity to update the ingredient list a bit? Thanks again, I’ve been doing BP intermittent fasting for a few weeks now with great results mentally and physically!

  • http://www.facebook.com/phil.young.906 Phil Young

    Dave…you mentioned that with a few tweak the diet can very adapted for power lifters or athletes. Can you detail what sort if tweaks you’re talking about?

  • Ken Leigh-Smith

    I’m having no luck finding grass-fed butter in Vancouver, BC. Any recommendations for specific stores or brands to look for?

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Fredrick-Hahn/633467863 Fredrick Hahn

    I like your info Dave and think you’re spot on. But let me ask you this – how do you account for the legions of very muscular men and women who eat almost completely opposite of how
    you suggest?

  • Nick

    What if it is impossible where I live (Qc, Canada) to get grass fed beef and therefore grass fed butter? Is there a replacement for meat and bulletproof coffee?

    • Zorica Vuletic

      I think people get overly hung up about grass fed butter/beef. In Que. there are plenty of organic and mostly grass fed farmers around (and in winter they will feed dried grasses to the cows). You have to search.

      I also find if in a pinch, that using cultured butter from ‘regular’ cow fed that it helps a lot. Also, I believe in Canada we do not suffer as much corruption and sketchiness in our food supply (humns and animals). It might not be ideal or 100% grass fed, but it is certainly still better than American stuff. Just have a look around for at least the most organic farmers in your area and also look for cultured. (I believe the culturing does something to the butter too which seems to ‘neutralize’ any non-grass fed component.

      • Michael A

        I appreciate a lot of the comments you made but I think that you are mistaken in saying “I believe the culturing does something to the butter too which seems to ‘neutralize’ any non-grass fed component.”.

        Culturing will not add vitamins to butter, it will not add healthy fats, and it will not remove toxins. It may reduce some of the irritants in the butter and it will add probiotics.

  • Devon

    Over the past couple of years my diet has been heavily influenced by the works and research of a Dr. Joel Fuhrman and his book “Eat to Live”. Of which, I’m sure you must be familiar with. A lot of what he says is contradictory to what you say. Primarily his strong claims to avoid eating animal products, including 100% grass fed. Who’s expertise do I follow?? Ahhhh!

  • http://www.facebook.com/carefoot Nick Carefoot

    I heard microwaving food is bad but is there an explaination? I know that they banned microwaves in the USSR in the 70s but not in the USA.

  • http://www.facebook.com/kim.thompson.338 Kim Thompson

    Peer review, research, blah, blah, blah. The only proof is to try it for yourself. How’s your diet? How do you feel? How’s your energy? Attitude? Bowel movements? If what you’re eating keeps you full, energized, sharp, happy, fit and feeling healthy, then go for it. If eating grains and processed sugars does that for you, by all means, carry on. I only know that my overall health improved, dramatically, after having been a raw food vegan, when I began to eat a Paleo diet. I don’t feel the need to be backed up by research and studies because my body is giving me the message that this is what works for me. So, go on with your bad self, Dave!

    • Michael A

      Self-experimentation is important but is extremely susceptible to bias. Peer-reviewed research is as well but much less so.

      You feeling better on paleo is not a fluke or a unique attribute of you. You feel better on paleo because man evolved as an omnivore and our bodies are therefore built to run on meat and veggies. Sure sensitivities to certain foods may vary by the individual but the core features of a healthy diet do not vary between people. We are MUCH more similar than we are different.

  • Guest

    I have b

  • lagamemnon

    I have been following this diet for about 3 months and have burned a decent amount of fat. However, I just got my blood lipids checked and my cholesterol had nearly doubled (130s to 250)! I was pretty alarmed and am not sure if I should continue with this diet. Everything else has been good, I’ve been feeling energetic and burning fat, but I’m not sure what I should do about my cholesterol levels. Any suggestions?

    • Spin S

      My understanding is that when you first start the Paleo diets and you are loosing weight that your cholesterol spiking is very common. Once the weight loss tapers off and stops your cholesterol levels should come back down.

  • Sam

    why is starch even from potatoes which is just quality glucose so limited? What about for the very active person or the underweight person with a high metabolism?

  • TheP

    Hi…love the bulletproof diet & biohacks…have a question about tea though…I’m a big tea drinker (matcha green tea & also white tea are my staples) and was wondering about the bulletproof perspective on these teas, as well as Roobios tea. Are these 3 drinks compatible with the bulletproof diet?

    Thanks!

    • Dave Asprey

      Yes!

      Sent from an iphone. That means it’s spelled wrong…and I’m probably lost. You understand… -Dave

      • upperbobby

        !!!!!! Dave is back! ;)

  • http://www.facebook.com/toke.petersen.1 Toke Petersen

    I live in denmark where rye is a big part of the food. It is generally considered healthy but it dosnt specifically say how corn products like rye affect your health

    I know that it said ” any … whole grain”. But from what i have heard it should be considerably better than for example oats. Can anybody confirm this? or should i cut rye as well?

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  • KC

    I am really interested in starting this diet, but I don’t drink coffee… Will it work with tea? If so, does it matter which kind?

  • http://twitter.com/stevesko Steve Ko

    Are there any negative effects to having type 1 and type 3 collagen powder? The one I got has both… couldn’t find just type 1.

  • kitty

    hi dave!
    does this diet work well on people with ibs/crohn’s etc?

    why is it better than the paleo-diet which already sounds good to me?

    can you explain this to me: ‘aturated fat does not raise cholesterol levels over time.’ and then ‘Saturated fat raises HDL cholesterol’ ?

    • kitty

      oh an’ ‘Brown rice (not white) prevents protein digestion and lowers nitrogen balance (a marker of muscle retention).’ but your scheme shows that brown rice is on green, so it should be good?

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  • orieo

    Hey I’m having an issue finding what fasting or “fat days” I should be doing. I just want to know where everything information wise is coming from… is it a book or some thing I see comments about things I haven’t seen on the site… coffee is awesome, diet is great and tweaking a few things to suit my body now… been on the diet for 2 and a half weeks lost 15 pounds and plateaued now I’m losing inches and feeling great!

  • Bardufoss84

    maybe I need more MCT-Oil, but i subscribed and can’t find the bulletproof PDF nor “bulletproof toolbox”. Help, anyone?

  • Nick

    for any doubters…this diet 100% works

  • http://www.facebook.com/mark.stocket Mark Stocket

    Hey, what’s wrong with roasted almonds (or roasted nuts in general)?

    Thx.

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  • daniel

    Dave, you totally missed the lipid hypothesis. I’m so sorry you spent that much money on this.

  • Notsogullible

    Wow, you guys are good. You really know how to market your products. I’m sure you are covered with leaches by now.

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  • http://www.facebook.com/marius.aglen Marius Aglen

    I like this whole blog. But think my body is so fucked up, it can be on this diet =[

    I started losing weight rapidly, always hungry. I had to cut out MCT oil, since that gave me cramps, diharrea, naucea, and felt like vomitting.

    My normal weight is 65kg, I went down to 57,9kg, and I’m a male.

    Ive always struggled with being a thin ectomorph. And have extreme fructose malabsorption.

    Can’t seem to find any carbs in here, I know u keep talking about the fat. But I think my gut has big problems with that at the moment, trying to fix it. And i’ve tried to do best I can.

    I buy the best butter I can find in Norway, unsalted, and I boil it gently, remove the white stuff. I use coconut oil, and I eat fresh meat. But I have to eat potatoes, nothing else to eat with it, or I lose weight like a crazy person. (Rice makes constipation worse for me lol).

    And none of the pasta type shit is an option, also avcourse cut out all grains.

    * Pulls hair, why is this so hard lol *

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  • bulletproofcheesesteak

    would love to hear tips on staying bulletproof while Traveling for longer periods of time when it is difficult to learn the source of things.

  • bulletproofcheesesteak

    also any opinions on Berkey water filters

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  • Chris

    New 20 year Study out by Harvard says that eating any type of red meat significantly increases the chances of premature death and heart problems. What do you say to this Dave?

    • Madeleine Fulton

      Look into the type of red meat they were eating – grain fed or grass fed? What other components were in the diets that perhaps coud have contributed to mortality? Lifestyle variables? etc. How was the study controlled? Often conclusions like that (definitive blanket statements) are made due to confirmation bias, and are either not actually supported by the study’s results, or the study was not sufficiently controlled for all other variables.

    • Elenor

      Too lazy to go look it up (without the study name even) but is this the study that counted pizza and hotdogs (with rolls) AS “red meat”?! As in — high carb MEALS and highly processed meat products as if they were actual red meat!? Even the grass-fed/feed-lot difference pales as against pizza=meat!!

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Joel-Regen/771359931 Joel Regen

    I’m seriously underweight and have been for my entire life of 56 years. How will this diet improve my life and help me GAIN WEIGHT and not lose it? I’m 56, 5-10, 140 pounds.

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  • Brian

    Dave, the coffee with the butter tastes good but it leaves my stomach very unsettled. Any ideas?

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  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Lothario-Rowe/100002001115892 Lothario Rowe

    So all this leaves about 20% of daily calories from veggies? If I’m eating about 2,500 calories a day, this means I should get about 1,500 calories from fat (which would be 15(!?) tablespoons of MCT oil or grass fed butter), 500 calories from protein (easy enough), and 500(!?) calories from veggies (which means if 1 cup of spinach = 10 calories, I must consume 50 cups of spinach a day for veggies to account for 20% of my daily calories).

    The part that sticks out to me is the 15 tablespoons of butter, and the 50 cups of spinach or other veggies per day. In light of actually doing the math…how in the WORLD is this diet possible?? The 500 calories from protein is feasible. The 1,500 calories from fat, and the 500 calories from veggies however seems humanly impossible. Please explain!

    • Josh

      Per gram, fat has over 2x more calories than protein or carbs. Avocados, extra-virgin olive oil, and fatty, grass-fed beef along with your daily cup of Bulletproof Coffee should provide you with the necessary amount of fat.

    • Yuri

      Sweet potatoes?

    • alexschindler

      in what universe is butter the only source of fat in a healthy diet?

      my breakfast generally consists of five eggs with either meat or cheese in them, cooked in either coconut oil or butter. the eggs account for 25g fat, the butter or oil another 12 or so, the cheese or meat another 8 or so. that will be washed down with 16 oz of whole milk, another 16g of fat. sometimes i add flaxseed to morning eggs depending how i’m making them.

      leaving aside the flax that makes 61g of fat or 550 fat calories at breakfast. I don’t have a stick of butter or bulletproof coffee cause I think it’s a stupid-ass protein-free breakfast for a healthy person and scams about ‘toxins’ in other coffee don’t rly interest me.

      for another 100g of fat in that day, I can eat a single 16oz steak and i’m at about 161g, 1450 calories. i have two teaspoons of fish oil a day, that adds another 8g or 72 calories. and there we are.

      • Barchiel

        EAT A DICK. IT’S FILLING

      • Pedro Jones

        what are your cholesterol numbers? I predict advanced heart disease soon.

    • Judy

      Why not have an avocado or add some olive oil to your salad dressing? Have some almonds? You seem really dead set on eating butter alone…

  • Scott

    This sucks. I came on here after hearing Dave on the fat burning man podcast and I think he really sounds interesting. I’m about 110lbs over weight and 40 years old and I’ve started on this journey. Part of that is I’m looking for information and inspiration from other peoples experiences. When reading a few of the comments here the biggest thing that sticks out is is how childish and sarcastic some of the comments are. There’s even people picking on each others spelling for goodness sake.

    The one thing I’ve found so far is there is no one person who has all the answers, Dave included (sorry Dave). But after hearing him on the podcast and grabbing a copy of the book I’m gonna at least look at what it says because a lot of it does make sense.

    But I’m gonna be looking at a lot of books and listening to a lot of people and hopefully finding a lot of people going through the same thing to talk to.

    nad yuo knwo whta if we disagre adn/or sppell it rwong who craes as lnog as were al takling, laerning, grwoing and gteting healthier.

    • Sonia W

      Hey Scott- sorry you’ve felt crappy about the comments on the forum. It does suck, you’re right. Most people come here for the same thing- help, inspiration etc. and I think most people get it too.
      I hope you’re working your way through the bulletproof-ness and soon these trolls won’t bother you. :)

  • Ruben

    Can you explain to me why whey protein concentrate is so much better than whey protein isolate?

  • solon

    No proof whatsoever of any problems eating gmo foods. You should remove that quackery, distracts from other points.

    What’s wrong with pepper???

  • DAVID

    Finished our first bag of your coffee, was about to order some more when wife had bought 4 bags of Starbucks Christmas blend at huge discount she said.My question is, how terrible worse ”JUST-FOR-NOW” to just put the Kerigold Unsalted Butter & your Upgraded MCT Oil in that? OH and we bought on clearance one of those Cuisinart SmartStick Immersion Hand Stick Blenders for almost half off in a store closure !!! I have found I have to use about half the butter for now & only two teaspoons of the oil till I get better use to it….THANKS

  • Laura C

    After years on of gluten free then grain free diet I thought I had it all figured out. We are grain free, low glycemic, organic and eat no processed industry GF crap. I understood which fats were healthy and cooked with coconut oil. However, the low fat concept was so deeply ingrained that I was still avoiding fats and using even the healthy ones in moderation. Now that I have jumped onto the Bulletproof diet bandwagon with both feet I am amazed at the increase in energy and focus after just a two weeks. It shows that even for people who are Paleo, Dave’s upgraded version can make a big difference.

    One area I have not yet heard mentioned in the blogs (I read all of them over the holidays and am half way through the podcasts) was the one thing my naturopath and dietician could not fix – infrequent bowl movements. Not to get too graphic, but daily activity is hugely important to detoxing your body. The high fat diet had an immediate impact so not only is my brain feeling better but my gut is too.

  • LV

    Curious why mushrooms and black pepper are closer to the avoid section…? Thanks!

    • dmnk

      mold!

  • Marcin

    Dear Dave,
    Why do you recommend avoiding commercial lard.? I know that it comes from commercialy raised pork so it is not as nutritious as organic lard but still, if we assume that no vegetable fats are mixed in, surely it is not bad, is it? You placed it at the end of the scale right next to margarine. Please explain.

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  • Chris

    Are there any types of flour that you approve of? Or what is the least objectionable type of flour to use? Rice flour?

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  • http://www.dreamten.com Philip L

    Dave,

    What are your thoughts on organic einkorn wheat? William Davis discusses einkorn in his book Wheat Belly, and says that the danger of modern day wheat is that it has been genetically mutated and is not the same wheat eaten hundreds of years ago. Einkorn however, has not undergone this mutation, and thus does not spike your insulin in the same ways. Would you recommend einkorn on your bulletproof diet?

    • Dave Asprey

      There are other reasons to avoid all grains except white rice, like carbs and anti-nutrients. No grains for better health!

  • Kinglis

    If a grass fed animal is fed antibiotics when sick does that effect the quality of meat?

  • derekkirkup

    Hi David, firstly thanks so much for all this information. I’ve spent lots of time today reading through it and creating a shopping list. I wonder if you have any links to recipes based on this diet, and particularly a shopping list/recipes mindful of low budgets?

    Thanks again!

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  • Phil

    Hi, I tried your coffee the other day, tasted nice but made me anxious and irritable . I hadn’t drank coffee since the summer, so maybe i’ve got an allergy to caffeine. What do you think Dave?

  • http://www.facebook.com/atb212 Alex Bailey

    Are there any cereals that you could recommend?

  • panorama

    Stop the hating this blog doesnt exist for those types of purposes were here to help one another ive got alot of respect for dave and ppl like him that do the things they do out of love as i think all of us should do what you do out of love not out of hate

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  • Greg

    I want to to take this diet seriously but it’s difficult when there are so many clear discrepancies between the infographic, the shopping guide and the blog posts. Here’s what I’ve found so far:

    Rice:
    The infographic says that wild, black or brown is better than white (the former are even in the green section). But the shoppng guide and blog posts say that white is the only type you should eat at all.

    Grapefruit:
    It’s listed as a top tier fruit within the infographic but your blog post totally bashes it.

    Blueberries:
    The infographic says it’s a medium sugar fruit that’s inferior to the other berries. But it’s listed as equal to the other berries in the shopping guide

    Tomatoes:
    Listed as a middle tier VEGETABLE after the low sugar fruits in the infographic. However, it’s listed as a top tier FRUIT in the shopping guide

    Kale:
    A top tier vegetable in the infographic but nowhere to be found int the shopping guide.

    Can you clarify these issues and/or point us to which source is the most current? Pretty disappointing that the infographic and shopping guide don’t even match, considering these are two of the most prominent resources you expect everyone to follow.

    • Derrick G.

      Also interested in the answer to this comment.

    • http://biohacked.net/ damien blenkinsopp

      Interested in answer to this – I’d seen the brown rice vs. white rice conflict too

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  • beefeater

    I like this article and i will definitely refer back to it. I could find things to pick-at but overall It seems pretty right on. I do have one major beef though. The article says 60% fat 20% protein and 20% from vegetables. Getting any significant amount of calories from vegetables is difficult if you refuse to eat the starchy/sugary ones which are not recommended by your charts. Anyways, you basically recommend getting very little carbohydrate. I could try to get all sciency and talk about your nervous system needing carbs to function properly (which I’m pretty sure is true) but id just be talking out my ass. So I will just relate that I was basically raised on meat, fish, a daily multivitamin, and a wee bit of vegetables. I was always perfectly healthy but over the past few years Ive started to consume more carbohydrates and it has been really beneficial to me. Ive always been a decent athlete but could never run long distances. Short spurts of strength and low intensity-over time were fine but sustained running just never worked right. I realized the problem was no carbohydrate intake. Its shocking what a difference it makes for high intensity endurance exercise. Also I’m much happier/livelier with some rice/bread in my diet. Most important for me personally, I’ve noticed my mind functions much better on carbs. Its not that I’m any smarter or anything but I’m able to concentrate more effectively and for longer periods of time. Don’t get me wrong I’m sympathetic to the whole fat and protein thing (and i agree bran is the devil) but there is a reason people consume carbohydrates. You don’t need a lot but if you want to feel and perform your best you need more than non-starchy vegetables will provide.————–You already cover this but ill repeat it cause its important if your gonna eat mostly meat/fat you better eat only grass-fed, a lot of fatty fish, or take an omega three supplement.

  • upperbobby

    Dave, I just got some of Dr. Friedlander’s collagen powder and I want to get some Upgraded Whey too, but I saw a video where Dr. Friedlander says people who use whey protein will develop irritable bowels and thyroid problems. Any thoughts on this?

  • Geoffrey Hurowitz

    i am wondering what dave, and other posters feel about raw meal meal powder: http://www.gardenoflife.com/Products-for-Life/Foundational-Nutrition/RAW-Meal.aspx

    —- it has some grains and carbs, yet it’s high quality ingredients, what do you think of having this in the morning or after working out? or throughout the day?

  • josh v

    hi im just wondering why you put onion and garlic so far to the right as far as I know there both very healthy and have great immune boosting and viral fighting properties

  • Jerinos

    Why are sweet potatoes listed near the bottom at avoid? I’ve heard elsewhere on this site that rice and sweet potatoes are the two foods that are high in carbs and are recommended to be eating 1-2 times a week

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100002800008630 Søren Møller

    What about beetroot and parsnips? Where do they factor in?

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  • vikesfan

    Hi Dave. I heard you on “Not just Paleo” podcast. That was THE BEST episode I’ve heard. I think you spent 20 min on just salt….. boring right? NO! It was so interesting. I ate up every word, along with everything else that was discussed. You are my new hero, and I can’t wait to learn more from your website. Thanks and keep sticking it to the man.

  • Vicky

    Following the diet , what is the healthiest fish ?
    The fish you enjoy eating the most and why?
    what do you think about ,when you buy fish?

  • Ashley

    Do you have any sample menus for the bulletproof diet?

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  • http://www.facebook.com/wintershope Stephen Nelson

    Just Started on this diet a couple weeks ago. I was very skeptical, But my cousin swore by it. Over a weekend I ate at his table. So I ate the bullet proof diet approved. I didnt try the coffe though. When I got home my pants were looser and I felt really good. I converted then and there. Every day wake up and notice that I feel good. I am wearing clothes that I was able to wear for a long time now, and every day they get a little looser. People mention that I have lost weight, but it hasnt even been a full two weeks.
    Thank you for this diet!

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  • Tom

    I tried eating this low carb approach eating just meats and veggies and never lost weight. You say no need to count calories or amounts, but for me it doesn’t work. I LOVE meat and vegetables and can eat a lot. So, I think that you need to add something for AMOUNTS and PORTIONS.

  • Clementine Eberhart

    I have had food issues for a long time. Sensitivity to gluten, dairy and sugar are my main issues. I am just barely over the weight I want to be but love to work out and do so full time. My issue has always been that without the wheat in my diet and working out I am always hungry but always irregular or feeling sick.

    My boyfriend discovered BP when looking for more discussion on sleeping and diet for the most energy. He discovered the coffee first and tried it immediately and loved it. I am a traditionalist with my coffee, just light sugar and cream but love good strong coffee. I would not subject to his butter and coconut craziness. It was a sin in my eyes. He changed his entire diet based on BP and loved it, felt great, regular, energy, functioning well but slept 10 hours a day, which was insane compared to my five hour maximum night sleep. We shortly realized it was due to the amount of exercise he did (P90X) and so he started to do the carb backloading and continue to sleep as much as he needed and his energy improved even more.

    He got me on the BP diet, I am always trying to figure out what is best for me with all of my sensitivities and I found it! BP is incredible. I have never eaten so much fat in a day but I feel satisfied and a healthy full most of the day. I used to eat every 2 hours I was so hungry after a workout but with my coffee and butter in the morning and a light breakfast of eggs and veggies usually, maybe some grass fed bacon or beef, I am good until lunch time. My stomach issues have gone also, especially with the charcoal, what a blessing!

    I also feel great working out less, my energy is high but i still feel healthy and that my body is moving in the positive direction. My boyfriends and my goal are to be able to be fit for anything, never have our fitness hinder us from doing things we love, but to not have to exercise for over an hour a day to maintain this. It consumes our lives and takes away from things we love. And so we are on the BP track and already feeling great.

    For anyone who says it is bullshit and doesnt work…try it, a challenge and see what happens, give it a week. Bummer…a week of eating all the butter, coffee, and meat you want! (grass fed of course…)

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  • http://gigieatscelebrities.com/ GiGi Eats Celebrities

    Dave, I think I just fell in love with you, ha!

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  • Jet

    A “scientist” would also link to all the research proving this does not work.

  • http://www.facebook.com/dave.walsweer Dave Walsweer

    I’m just concerned that rice is contaminated with arsenic.

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  • Tecpedz94

    Some stuff is right and interesting but i don’t agree with everything.

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  • Steph

    Im a 29 year old mom of 3 young boys. Im adopting to the bulletproof diet but I want to do more. I certainly do not have the money to purchase all the recommended products, hacking tools, or supplements. I scour your blog when I have time, but it leaves me terrified I am full of toxins, deficient in nutrients and slowly killing my body. Whats the best place to start!?

  • Elle

    Hi Dave, Do you have any thoughts on Ray Peat’s articles? It coincides with some of your stuff but differs on the fructose. It is very logical though; I’m curious is you’ve ever seen it?

  • http://www.facebook.com/steve.herman.5688 Steve Herman

    Dave, I’ve recently run across KerryGold brand grass fed cheese at a Costco near me. I nearly purchased a block at about $15, but I wanted to get your take on it first. From reading your blog and the info graphics that “grass fed” is in the green, but “cheese” is typically leaning towards the red.

    I just wonder once you combine grass feed and cheese if the grass fed trumps the bad part of cheese or if the process of making cheese cancels the benefits of grass fed?

    Bottom line should I eat the stuff or not?

  • Hannah

    So I realize I’m not exactly on the cutting edge by finding all of this just now, but I can’t help noticing that this hasn’t been updated since 2011. Has there simply been no new research done since then (a bit hard to believe), or has this movement sort of fizzled out?

  • http://www.facebook.com/brittany.l.shaw.7 Brittany Layne Shaw

    Are you supporting Brown Rice over white then? I’m concerned about the phytic acid in brown rice. And are you supporting gluten free grains as opposed to NO grains?

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  • Tim

    Just curious what information you can provide on optimal levels of water intake to accompany this diet???

  • 1avocadotree

    Why is nutmeg closer to Avoid?

  • spencer jacksonson

    i am a kickboxer.
    ive tried a variety of diets.
    (most of which have been proved to be unfruitful endeavors)
    i have roughly 4 weeks to loose about 15 lbs.
    143ish to 130

    this isnt hard to acheive but when ive lost the weight in the past–all weight lost has been because of sweating and starving (i.e–water weight/fasting)
    would this diet lend its self to be helpful in losing more of the weight comfortably
    as opposed to the horrendous measures ive taken in the past?

    any input would be helpful!

  • chris

    Dave, First time visitor but it seems like some interesting ideas. My only issue would be the raw milk suggestion. To me, based on my understanding of current FDA research it wouldn’t be advisable for the population as a whole to consume raw milk as any potential contaminants would not be rendered harmless.

  • Ben

    Dave, this diet has changed my life and how I view my body and diet since I found about it 5-6 months ago. I was a vegetarian for a few months prior to learning about this diet, and before becoming a vegetarian, I had no knowledge of almost anything presented here. Since introducing grass fed meat into my diet, along with almost strictly veggies, walnuts, almonds, and fruits, I feel healthier and younger than I ever have before. Thank you so much.

    One question, how many times should one eat meat a week? I’ve heard some professionals say only 2-3 times a week.

  • Shae

    Cheese actually boosts “insulin sensitivity” and anti-inflammatory effects by constituent palmitoleic acid’s interaction with GPCR 120, like EPA and DHA. It mediates the effects through B-arrestin 2 in shutting down inflammatory protein transcription/translation and amplifies anti-inflammatory gene transcription. In addition, palmitoleic acid’s interaction causes GPCR 120 to activate Gq/11 to recruit GLUT 4 to the surface of the cell membrane, aiding in glucose disposal. However, to say that these fats aid in sensitivity is a bit of a far fetched claim by any study or scientist since EPA/DHA/Palmitoleic acids don’t increase the expression of Insulin recognizing RTKs. The confounding factor is that GLUT 4 expression is much greater in adipocytes (and myocytes), and hence blood sugar levels remain lower, and so the pancreas isn’t influxing glucose via GLUT 3, and thus is not creating ATP which acts to inhibit K+ efflux channels of Langerhans cells, which in turn then allows calcium to influx into the cells through channels to stimulate insulin (hence, insulin is not expressed so much like in type ii diabetes).

    http://www.cell.com/abstract/S0092-8674%2810%2900888-3?switch=standard

    http://pubmedcentralcanada.ca/pmcc/articles/PMC3419590/

    I don’t know if there are other chemicals such as hydrogenates in pasteurized cheese that would support the claim, but the effects of palmitoleic acid and how they make up a significant amount of cheese is overwhelming. Just get a good brand of cheese, or ice cream if you’re actually going to have some fun (grass fed is best). Don’t throw cheese out the window, like other dairy :) . I do agree with claims against homogenized milk and yogurt, since their fats are definitely the most tampered with, and they do carry a lot of phytic acid.

    Also, fiber actually increases expression of insulin, if there are carbohydrates present after fiber ferments into SCFA’s, as SCFA’s stimulate incretin GLP-1 and GIP synthesis via the gastrointestinal tract and pancreas by interacting with GPCR 40. Interestingly, w-3′s and palmitoleic acid actually stimulate GLP-1 synthesis as well by binding to GPCR 120, specifically expressed in the islets of Langerhans, so they also induce insulin expression- although I think the pros definitely outweigh the cons, as SCFAs have been shown to increase expression of leptin (which is conditionally good, pending on leptin sensitivity). I just thought I’d mention it- don’t forget to consider all the info available.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21607156

  • http://www.facebook.com/scott.belanger.144 Scott Belanger

    Hi Dave
    I am new here and have ordered coffee,whey,MCT . I am writing because somewhere I saw a great list of recipes but can not find them!! please help. I did make 2 batches of the sweet potato ginger brownies and really enjoyed them -but I need more of your recipes !!
    Thank you,
    Scott Belanger

  • http://www.facebook.com/rusty.christian Rusty Christian

    After two weeks following the Bulletproof diet, I have lost 12 pounds! But even more amazing to me is that I am sleeping better and no longer have IBS! Finally, life away from the toilet!! I have suffered from IBS for nearly 40 years – must have been all of that cereal! Thanks so much! PS love the coffee too!

  • samirashafir

    There are plenty of fats and,as your effortlessly lose weight and gain muscle on little or no exercise.you can weight/measure for a few days to get a better understanding

    Anti Aging

  • Brittany Estrada Anderson

    I followed this ratio for about a month and felt awesome, and am looking to get back to it again. This time around I want to cut my fruit intake way down and add bulletproof coffee. My question is, is the coffee meant to replace breakfast? If not, what does your typical breakfast look like?

    Thanks!

  • http://www.facebook.com/joshua.hamilton2 Joshua Hamilton

    Hey Dave,

    Do you know if house cats can safely eat grass-fed butter and receive the same benefits as humans? I talked to my vet one time about the optimum diet for felines and he said that house cat breeds and felines in general do not break down carbs and vegetables like humans. They essentially get no nutrition from anything other than animal protein, preferably from sources that are fresh and cooked the least. I feed my cats tuna, chicken, various fish and shrimp based wet foods that are raw rather than grilled like many are today. Just curious if you new whether or not the Omega-3 fats could help my cats with their joints and injury recovery rate as I know feline’s suffer from arthritis in their old age just like humans. I figured it would considering they would be getting plenty of animal fats with all that fresh protein.

    Thanks for the site and free info,

    Josh

  • Mira D

    How do you cook meat to make it bulletproof?

  • JD

    I have been trying to eat Ghee but cannot seem to digest it well and also get very flushed in the face. Any known reason for this or do I just not digest saturated fat well?

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  • M. Schultz

    No one diet fits all. Read the work of William Kelly the dentist who cured himself of pancreatic cancer and went on to cure others using biological typing in his protocol. He discovered 10 basic metabolic types with 90 variations of these types. Today Dr. Nicholas Gonzalez continues to cure cancer patience using Kelly’s protocol.

    Read the work of Weston Price, another dentist that researched indigenous people around the world during the 1930s. People were healthy on many different types of diets until they began to eat processed, “civilized” foods such as white flour and white sugar and then their teeth began to rot. Would you expect an Eskimo living on 80% animal fat to do well as on a plant based diet. Metabolic type have evolved over thousands of years. All of the diets in the diet books work great for the author and all of those who are of the same metabolic type as the author but will not work for all. Forget the dietary rules that have been created by the food industry. You have to find what works for you. It takes work. Dave has found what works for him. If you are the same metabolic type it will work for you. If it doesn’t work for you, then you have more work to do. Most of the diets out there have a few things in common, like eat organic, avoid GMO products, eat whole, not processed foods.

    Then there are those that do better eating meat, Others feel better on a plant based diet. No one diet fits all. Let’s not all get angry because someone doesn’t eat they way you do. For some people Dave’s diet will work, but not all.

  • Archie Hughes

    For the cooking method, what are your thoughts on a Traeger grill? They use indirect heat like a convection oven and uses wood pellets as its heat source. I would assume it would fall somewhere between BBQ and oven. Let me know your thoughts. Thanks!

  • Scott Hartley

    Why do you advocate bropwn rice before white when #8 advocates the opposite?
    (Brown rice (not white) prevents protein digestion and lowers nitrogen balance (a marker of muscle retention). (8)

    • christof42

      He promised to fix it in the next version of the infographics.
      White is greener :) .

      • Scott Hartley

        Got it. Thanks

  • Madeleine Fulton

    In terms of sweeteners, what about the “Just Like Sugar Tabletop Sweetener” that is made of only natural chicory root dietary fiber, calcium vitamin C, and orange peel (http://www.amazon.com/Just-Like-Sugar-Table-Sweetener/dp/B00430EJY6)? It is zero calorie, the nutrition label reads all zeros except a ton of dietary fiber.

    I’m not a fiber advocate by any means, but it seems like a great option over sugar and other heavily processed and/or extracted sweeteners. Jane Barthelemy (author of cookbook “Paleo Desserts”) loves it, and I have found it delicious and easy to use in ice cream and a couple other recipes of hers that I’ve tried. I have no idea what this product does to insulin levels – it seems to be fairly new so there isn’t much info on it. I’d love to hear your opinions, Dave and community! Thanks.

  • SeanRippin

    How come no sprouts?….

  • Jim

    Your results aren’t based on this bs diet its based on your hormone supplementation.

  • Harris

    Thanks Dave for all the free advice I’ve been bulletproof for 3 months now and I feel great, keep up the good work bro!! Great info on the JRE… POWERFUL!!!!

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  • Rdd TheStrong

    I may be wrong about this, but If white rice is better than brown rice, why is brown rice more on the green-er side of bullet proof?

  • Adam Breen

    Hi Dave, I’ve been following the Bulletproof diet for 5 days now, and overall, I really like it. For 3 days, I went with the Bulletproof IF approach as well, as I am no stranger to intermittent fasting, in general.

    Question: Today, I’m feeling very light-headed. I decided not to do the IF today, as I was very tired yesterday afternoon, and had a good bulletproof dinner, then went to bed early (slept about 10 hours). I had a good bulletproof breakfast (clean bacon, asparagus, clean free-range poached eggs, lightly boiled spinach with lots of grass-fed butter, about 50g grass-fed steak (baked), a whole avocado, plus some high quality black coffee with a little coconut oil (very high quality also).

    Are there perhaps some supplements I could take? Or am I doing something wrong? The first few days I really did feel “bulletproof” in the mornings, but today I’m having a lot of trouble thinking straight.

    Thanks in advance!

    Adam

    • Zorica Vuletic

      Good question. Someone else might have better suggestions for vitamins, but I will say to keep an eye on your electrolytes. Sometimes with LC for some reason people’s electrolytes can become unbalanced. For example, sometimes you lose a lot of salt since you get less water retention in the absence of (starchy) carbs.

      • Adam Breen

        Thanks Zorica. In this case, I don’t think that’s the problem. I eat quite a lot of good quality sea salt (and have started taking a pinch of Himalayan salt in my glasses of water, which I drink regularly during the day).

      • Adam Breen

        Hi Zorica, thanks for the reply.

        In this case, I don’t think that’s my problem, as I eat quite a lot of high-quality sea salt, and have also started taking a pinch of Himalayan pink salt in my water (which I drink regularly through the day).

        • Zorica Vuletic

          Well, I’m in the adrenals and thyroid boat right now. If you’re interested, you can always test yourself for thyroid and adrenal levels. For info. on that go to STTM: stopthethyroidmadness.com for lots of info. and what kinds of tests to get. I don’t want to complicate things though so I will back out after this advice. :) Good luck!

  • Trish

    Dave,
    I am a new reader (thanks to the JRE!)
    Quick question – Do you have suggestions for situations in which it is not possible to eat bulletproof (ie. dinner at a wedding reception). Is there a supplement that is best to take beforehand to ward off mycotoxins and inflammation? Or is it best to eat bulletproof before and then eat only small amounts at the event? What would you do?
    Thank you!
    Trish

  • Benjamin

    Is cheese (more) okay if it’s raw AND grass-fed?

  • Gus
  • Dan Hatayama

    Hello,
    I was just wondering what I should do if I a slight allergic reaction to raw nuts. Roasted seems fine but raw make my throat itchy and makes my Asthma act up.
    Thanks a bunch :-D

  • LisaK

    What about unpasteurized(raw) organic cheese?

  • Dustin

    I’ve got to ask. Why would you place dextrose as a better thing to eat than raw honey!?

    • David W

      Fructose has negative metabolic properties (more so than glucose) and honey is a combination of fructose and glucose (along with some other good things). Dextrose is glucose (basically) and therefore does not have the negative properties of fructose.

  • stacy

    What about raw sauerkraut, homemade coconut yogurt, and coconut water kefir…are these helpful for people dealing with mycotoxins?

  • Madeleine Fulton

    Even in your updated infographic in Upgraded Chef, liver is no where to be found…would grass-fed organic beef liver be in the green?

  • Danny

    Dave, you mentioned recently on the Bryan Callen podcast about how brown-rice is bad due to anti-nutrient properties yet on the grain list, brown-rice is above white. Why so?

  • Hector Grimaldo

    Mr. Dave Asprey. I’m glad to have found your site, having ordered the coffee kit, I truly believe in the information. Before, I was leading myself to believe i could never change. Looking forward to Being Bulletproof.

    I post because I cannot believe the negativity coming from some of the people that have posted before me. Not having the understanding of how knowledge can change your outlook, some of the people have fooled themselves in that they are right. Right is proven results. People could find this information easily and choose to ignore it in exchange to having what they believe is right…

    And it is right for them, that they choose to. But the negative, disrepect that comes from that, to lash out at someone. Is something i truly don’t and will never understand. Looking forward to reading the hateful spew of the negatrons that look for reasons to dispense hatred….

  • nikki

    How can it ever be okay to eat non-organic dairy? I think that should without a doubt be an “Avoid” food.

  • nikki

    Also, is raw organic coconut butter okay?

  • David W

    Hey Dave,

    This is awesome. Glad your research agrees with a lot of my dietary views. I just had a few question that you or someone else may be able to answer

    1. Why are garlic and onion not slightly higher (towards eat) on your chart?

    2. You say cooked spinach in this chart; does baby spinach need to be cooked for maximum health benefits?

    3. Zucchini and papaya are often GMO, does that concern you?

    4. I am surprised carrots are as high as they are because of their sugar
    content; why are they not lower in a group with peppers or moderate
    sugar fruits/veggies?

    5. What is so bad about mushrooms?

    David

  • piotrugowski

    Where are studies on canned food and GMO? They’ve been downgraded to trash – why? They are obviously not “paleo” (nothing here is paleo except for fish, as all of the nutritious plants and animals were selected until they no longer resemble any historic species – with many fold increases in fat/protein/carbs) as they were created recently. But where is any proof they are actually threatening?

    With GMO I guess cautionary “don’t eat” is to some point justified as this is really, really new – but cans? There are a few generations of people that could eat canned stuff so this can be measured. In fact cans seem to be solely dependent on what you put in as there is no need for any preservatives – they’ve got huge shelf lives from packaging alone. It does cast a shadow on all of these valuations, if they were marked down just on the whim “I don’t like this” of the author, is the rest worth anything?

  • Adam

    re – Cooking methods: I wouldn’t argue that “burnt, blackened or charred” is healthy, but that is how meat would generally have been done in paleolithic times, at least if the Australian Aboriginal traditional cooking methods are anything to go by.

  • Hayden Bruce

    Please post a blog for broke college students who want to be bulletproof but can’t afford all the grassfed and organic ingredients, and may not have the time or resources to cook and specially prepare these foods. What can we do!?

  • Alison

    Can you let us know where Inulin (as a sweetener/prebiotic) fits in? I use/have used two brands: SweetLeaf Stevia (it’s mixed with inulin) and “Just Like Sugar” which is pure chicory root fiber and some orange peel extract. Thank you!

  • Prash

    Hey fellow Bulletproofers!

    I’m new to this site, but have read the BP diet + BP Coffee sections, including comments etc…

    And have a couple of questions:

    1. I know you’re not a fan of this, but I am strict vegetarian and nearly vegan (!)

    I intend to stay that way, but am already in generally good health/shape (for a 42 year old British Indian guy!) – 163lb , 17.5% bodyfat (36cm waistline) – and can squat, bench, deadlift, pull-up and dip my own bodyweight….

    BUT – my goal is to drop bodyfat and increase lean mass.

    I’m planning on coupling Body By Science Training protocol with your excellent BP diet

    BUT – the only catch is my vegetarian/veganish-ness….

    Can i still embrace BP in this manner, if I :

    - Rely on raw nuts + hemp + pea + brown rice protein for my protein sources? (presuming I’d have to avoid wheat gluten + soy – even GM-free soy and green edamine beans!??)

    Last question: with my vegan tendencies – can I swap the butter in the BP coffee, for either (a) more Virgin Coconut Oil, or (b) some other kind of fat (eg Walnut or Avacado oil, or Flax/Hemp oil) ?

    Appreciate your advice on the above,

    Thanks again!

    P

  • concerned OZ

    Just read through all the research you posted as ‘research proving this diet works’. I found that some of the links didn’t lead to access of the full paper but rather only a reduced abstract was available. I found the data supporting grass fed beef over grain fed to be great, but it still doesn’t necessarily support large quantities. I found the data supporting saturated fats intake to be good too, again doesn’t support why such high amounts are recommended by your program (just because something is good in moderation doesn’t necessarily mean it will be even better by increasing amounts consumed). I found the research trying to support reduction in intake of carbs from grain sources to be very limited. The trial sizes were small, most measures were subjective rather than objective and a lot admitted the need for more controlled trials to be conducted on humans for evidence to be conclusive (a lot of the research was animal based – rats and pigs). Some of the research was purely here say determined by pools of data rather than any original research being conducted but again they admitted there limitations so no harm done on there part. My concern is that many of the followers of this program will massively change there eating styles based on your suggestions without reading the research cited and making there own conclusions but rather blindly follow, which is entirely there choose and up to them, but I think there is better research out there that you could have linked to.
    Anyway, my question is… why do you recommend such high amounts of grass fed butter and grass fed beef as apposed to just doing the old switcheroo? Can you please link me to research that backs this up, am very interested.
    I looked up myself the benefits of coffee but you don’t cite any data to support intake of coffee even though it is large basis for the program. I don’t really care for blogs and opinions, I really would like some double blinded, or blinded clinical trials to back this up. If no data current maybe you could use some of your profits to research what you so strongly recommend.
    Many thanks and hope everyone is feeling fantastic!

  • Chris P.

    That kind of olives? And can you eat eggs with the coffee? After I walk my three miles in the morning I’m so hungry I’m shaking. The coffee doesn’t seem to hold me over.

  • http://www.peachesandcake.com/ Meg

    Why are roasted nuts worse than raw nuts?

  • Jimmy

    It’s so hard to avoid sweeteners in foods/ drinks. Even if it says ‘sugar free’ checkout the label and 9 times out of 10 it will have aspartame, sucralose or high fructose corn syrup. I try to avoid these at all costs.

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  • Ben

    Just wanted to share a shake recipe I put together recently that’s primarily made up of superfoods, makes me feel great, tastes pretty good (not super sweet, but you can add other sweeters if you want (honey, stevia, xylitol). Of course you could add more greens or whatever to it, (or 1/2 an avocado for more fat) but this doesn’t take any actual food to make other than a banana, which I throw in for flavor enhancement. I was using coconut milk/almond milk til I realized they both had carrageenan in them (it’s a seaweed-based thickener that is approved for use in certified organic products but degrades and is harmful in its degraded state). Now I just use water.

    RECIPE (this makes a serving and is pretty thick so can add more liquid):
    8 ounces water (I use Brita water but am about to get a better filter, see below)
    1 banana, organic when poss. For flavor, can substitute other “sweeteners”
    1 Tbsp Organic Chia Seeds
    2 Tbsp Raw Organic Cacao Powder
    1 Tsp Spirulina Powder (or Wheatgrass Juice Powder)
    1/2 Tsp Organic Ginger Powder
    1/4 Tsp Organic Turmeric Powder
    1/4 Tsp Cinnamon Powder

    If fat is desired, like I said you can add 1/2 avocado or 1-2 tbsp on MCT oil (63 Tbsp on Amazon for $16):
    NOW Foods Mct 100% Oil, 32-Fluid Ounces

    I haven’t added protein yet but after looking into protein extensively, I think I’m going to get Sun Warrior protein, this would be the most expensive part of it at 47 servings for $35 on Amazon:
    Sunwarrior Warrior Blend Powder, Chocolate, 2.2 Pound

    Total Price: If you use all the supplements in the amounts listed above and source them from Amazon as linked to below, it will cost you a whopping $1.16 per day to have an amazing shake! If you substitute wheatgrass for spirulina it would be $1.22 per day. If you add in a tbsp of MCT oil it would be $1.41 per day, 2 tbsp would be $1.66 per day. If you add in a serving of Sun Warrior protein powder, add $.75 to any of the above numbers. Still under $2.50 max. Not too shabby.

    Note: Spirulina Powder and MCT oil should be refrigerated after opening, the rest can be stored in a cool, dry place. I’m not 100% sure about the Sun Warrior protein storage requirements.

    Before I get into the rest of the ingredient sourcing, I also researched water purifiers because I want to stop ingesting fluoride, and other than a crazy expensive whole-house water filtration system, this is the best I’ve found and is what I’m getting. It’s a Berkey table-top filtration system for $289:
    Big Berkey Water Filter-2 Black Filters and 2 Pf-2 Fluoride Filters

    INGREDIENTS (I thoroughly researched price and quality to settle on each of these providers):
    Organic Chia Seeds (37 servings, $14 on Amazon). I picked these over the Nutiva ones because people are complaining about pebbles in those!:
    Navitas Naturals Chia Seeds, 16-Ounce Pouch

    Raw Organic Cacao Powder (40 servings, $18 on Amazon). There is also the option of getting a 5lb bag off wildernessfamilynaturals.com for $37.50+shipping, which I did (http://www.wildernessfamilynaturals.com/product/CACAOP5.php ):
    Navitas Naturals Cacao Powder, 8-Ounce Pouches (Pack of 2)

    Organic Ginger Powder (192 servings, $20 on Amazon). You can also get the 8 ounce version for $13:
    Indus Organic Ginger Powder Spice Pack, 1 Lb Jar

    Organic Turmeric Powder (384 servings, $16.50 on Amazon):
    Frontier Herb Organic Ground Turmeric Root, 1 Pound

    Organic Cinammon Powder (758 servings, $13.50 on Amazon):
    Frontier Ground Cinnamon Certified Organic, 16 Ounce Bags (Pack of 2)

    Spirulina Powder (151 servings, $25 on Amazon). One thing about Spirulina is that a lot of companies sell it but only a few actually produce it. Mainly in India, Hawaii and New Zealand/Australia (not sure which). This one took by far the longest to research. I chose this over the certified organic ones from India because the company that produces this seems to have extremely high quality control measures, has tested for fallout (from Fukushima) and has the best taste. Also I don’t trust Indian food products, no offense:
    Nutrex Hawaii Hawaiian Spirulina Pacifica Powder, 16-Ounce Bottle

    Another Option instead of Spirulina for greens is Wheatgrass Juice Powder. It has to be juice powder otherwise you’re not getting a good concentration. Here’s the one I have and use instead of the spirulina sometimes (90 servings, $21 on Amazon):
    Green Kamut Organic Heirloom Wheatgrass

    Finally, this isn’t part of the shake but got these digestive enzymes recently and they work great too. It’s 45 servings for $6.50 on Amazon:
    Futurebiotics Vegetarian Enzyme Complex Tablets, 90-Count

    Enjoy!

  • RES

    it’s crazy that people have such little to do with their lives that they spend their time arguing with strangers on a diet forum. I’ve been on the bulletproof lifestyle for a year and a half now & have never looked or felt better in my life. It really truly is a lifestyle change but it works! Stop questioning everything and just do it.

  • Ben Labbe

    I’ve found there’s benefits to eating boiledmashed potatoes an hour or so before lifting weights. I believe this is due to the fact that this food is high on the glycemic index. My muscles seem to love it, and I always get an incredible pump.

    Is there a legitimate connection?

    • Kayla

      I remember Dave saying it’s good to eat potato or white rice right after a workout. He specified after, but not sure why.

  • Ben Labbe

    It seems a majority of your “new energy” is coming from the lack of energy required by your digestive system to process the good foods.

  • mk

    Has anyone incorporated this with leangains? If so, has anyone used the bulletproof coffee as pre or post workout?

  • lissa reese

    What is Dave’s take on organic unsweetened almond milk? Where does it fall on the spectrum?

  • Louis

    I’m calling bullshit on at least some of this. I freaking love MSG, and there’s little to no evidence to suggest that it has any more of a negative effect on the body than salt.

  • Alan

    what is the bulletproof position on sauerkraut

  • Gabby

    What about grass fed cow cheese

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  • megan

    I will be reluctantly taking Prednisone for 30 days I eat upgraded paleo with virtually no sugar, alcohol, and very minimal fruit. Do I need to lower my fat intake at all while on this stupid corticosteroid? Thankfully, it’s only a month, but I just want to keep the stupid side effects to a low roar. Anybody what I need to watch in my diet?

  • Rach

    Does anyone know if organic coconut flour is ok?

  • Guest

    The benefits of eating (reasonable quantities) of blueberries (google if you aren’t familiar) and cherries (anti-inflammatory) outweigh any small disadvantages.

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  • JML

    I have been eating this way for over a year now. (Just discovered this website though)
    Yes I still drink Alcohol but mostly Gin and soda water maybe 1 day a week.
    I am “skinny” but my stomach still looks large and bloated. I just discovered the FODMAP diet list and I do think avoiding some of those veggies are helping with gas. but my stomach still pops out like a 2months pregnant. I have been told I have candida. but it just wont go down. I work out and eat “bullet proof” I dont know what else to do ! HELP!!!!

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  • mintykelan

    The diet says to avoid canned fruits and vegetables – but what about the home canned kind? I can my own in glass jars in spring-glacial water that comes from a very deep well or their own juice with no iodized salt. Freeze some also. Living in a very rural area – summer time there is lots of fresh local produce but in winter very limited selection. Our “supermarket” is not much bigger than some convenience stores in the city – talking about a 10 – 12 foot produce section. NO Organic anything.However the good part of living in the boonies is get to raise my own pasture beef, and spoiled to the point can’t eat city eggs,etc. Is the butter recommended any different than what I can make here on the farm?

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  • Naomi

    Would love to see an addition of a category for seeds! Also curious where things like spirulina fit in…. many thanks for what you do, Dave!

  • erik

    Dave:
    So once I start the bulletproof diet after I am done doing the rapid fat loss protocol, I will not gain any of the the lost weight back? More importantly do I still take all the supplements that I was taking on the rapid fat loss protocol while on this diet? I have been overweight for years and have had considerable success with the rapid fat loss protocol. Just do not want to gain weight again.

  • Kate

    Hummmm…I am very excited, and have already tweeted and Facebooked about this. But I am already on the mailing list. How can I get the upgraded PDF?

  • APokeInTheEye .

    XYLITOL? REALLY? I thought you’ve been researching this stuff for 15 years…
    People really try to read more about xylitol and how it’s produced etc. This is definitely not good for you. Just another hyped and very little researched product. Take time and look into this.
    PEACE! :)

    • pseudoavatar

      Xylitol has been researched and used as sweetener in various foods for many, many years. It’s health benefits in dentistry were proven in the 70′s. It might cause upset tummies, but only if you eat excessive amounts of it. It might also be poisonous to dogs, but not humans.

      How is this exactly “definitely not good for you”? Please back up your claims if you make such statements.

  • Bebe

    How about Supergreens or Rawfoods?

  • Alan Faulkner

    Interestingly your coffee recommendations with the “heavy on the oils’ pacifies the body types that would be driven crazy with the caffeine in coffee. You have come up with a clever way of getting some very good oils into people.

    Ayurveda says that Ghee (clarified butter) is a sacred thing. The Hindus even use it as a fuel at offerings to the Gods.

    Ghee (in Ayurvedic terms) makes the fire of digestion (chemical reactions) burn brightly and therefore gives a person excellent digestion, sort of like throwing kerosene on a fire. It also lubricates the GI tract which is a problem especially nowadays with grains drying out ppl’s tract. It also is an Anupan, which is a carrier of nutrition to the cells. In this case muscles.

    Ghee also can dull the fires of digestion if taken in excess, but that has the effect of cleaning out undigested food from the GI tract.

    Grains as you have figured out, are the diet of starvation.

    Speculation is that Ayurveda was written down (main text “Caraka Samhita”) about 2000 years ago before the tribes moved into the Indus Valley because the best Doctor(s) at the time ‘Caraka’ and his contemporaries saw the ppl move into the valleys and start to grow food, which is speculated as being the beginning of the downfall of man, because stored grains, means less meat and the grains meant it could be traded and thus the start of money and hoarding of it in particular.

  • Pedro Jones

    the writer who has zero scientific or medical training is a dangerous quack. aspartame has never been proven to be unsafe.

  • Cole

    I’m not buying it. He states “Saturated fat is not associated with cardiovascular disease. This is supported by almost every high quality observational study ever conducted” in the references. But read for yourself, doesn’t look like every study to me: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saturated_fat_and_cardiovascular_disease_controversy

  • Steph

    Hi. I’m a student living on a shoestring budget. What’s the best way to get the benefits of this diet/lifestyle program without going broke?

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  • Imran

    Can you please clarify how to cook with healthy fats like olive oil, butter, and coconut oil? I didn’t see anything in the cooking methods that can be used to cook with those materials.

  • Brandon

    so…in terms of cooking…what are some of everyone’s best ways to prepare their meats? Light grilling is something I like, but I’m also trying to make sure food safety comes first.

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  • lester jones

    All fad diets including bulletproof have zero scientific or medical research studies backing them up. They’re all designed to sell products and books. They are all doomed to fail. Thousands of years of people eating grains prove that grains are the way to go. 50 years of quacks spouting garbage prove nothing

    • Kayla

      I have read that the grains from even just 50 years ago are not the same species of grains people are consuming today. The ones people consume today are dwarf wheat and contain a much bigger amount of gluten than the grains your grandparents ate.

    • Joonyaboy

      Check out Jonathan Bailor. Ten years of research. How much have you done?

  • lester jones

    http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2013/09/26/226510988/doctors-say-changes-in-wheat-do-not-explain-rise-of-celiac-disease

    Leffler directs research at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and is on the faculty at Harvard Medical School.
    “I don’t think there’s one evil food causing the problem in our society,” Leffler says. In fact, he says most people eat wheat with no problem. “There’s good evidence that the vast majority of people actually do just fine with wheat.”

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  • Tuco

    Why are roasted nuts (almonds, pecans) on the “Avoid” end of the spectrum, whereas the raw version is on the “Eat” end? I have been buying raw pecans and almonds, tossing them in a bag with some MCT oil and sea salt, and then roasting them gently in the toaster oven. Is this bad?

    • Joonyaboy

      I think he means pre-roasted…or purchased that way

  • Ed

    Can’t seem to be able to get the 1-page pdf thing.. Click here > Enter your Email and Name etc.. and then what? I get an email with a vcf file with dave’s contacts.. wtf? Where’s the frikin pdf?

  • AnotherGuy

    I’m really intrigued by this diet, but I have one major issue: gout. It precludes me from having red meat (and a number of other foods, including many types of fish, vegetables like spinach and asparagus, and a number of other things) as a staple of my diet.

    Is it possible to be on the bulletproof diet with these restrictions? It seems damn near impossible, especially since chicken is a pretty big staple in my diet (for protein).

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  • Todd Wohl

    What about turnips?…..I don’t see them on the chart.

  • Guest

    Sorry but my own results as well as the ones from 2 work colleagues that had triple by-pass surgery dont sustain what you say about saturated fats. This and calling the china study poor research just cuts you credibility and shows that maybe you are catering to a very specific products industry.

    • Joonyaboy

      Different types of fats

    • victor

      Because that’s all doctors will tell you. The saturated fat makes you satiated where carbs make you hungrier and doctors point the finger to fat and not carbs. I’m 56 years old with 10 per cent body fat with a great lipid count. I consume 70 percent from fat which I burn off for energy, not carbs. The problem is when one consumes all that fat and eats a lot of carbs you’re gonna have problems.

  • Ezequiel Delvitto

    Hi, what are the proportions of each of the bulletproof bars do you recommend eating?

  • Austin

    This is now my favourite comedy site. It used to be Charles Poliquin’s (or Strength Sensei or whatever the fuck he calls himself nowadays?!) site, but this is much much funnier. Comedy gold right here!

  • carbsane

    Coconuts are not nuts. Oops.

  • carbsane

    Eat maltitol but not fruit juice concentrate?

  • WomanOnWildMountain

    Wow, this is a pretty rude and hostile comment thread. How ’bout you leave a simple and concise comment on how this style of eating has (or has not) helped you in your life. I feel GREAT: haven’t eaten gluten in four years, 100% grain-free for four months; I don’t eat sugar; I do eat wild or grass fed meat, raw, full-fat cream in my coffee, raw veggies and coconut butter. Weigh 105/110 and run/hike every single day. Boom! (And I’m not irritable like many of the naysayers here.) It’s pretty simple: it either works for you or it doesn’t. But don’t knock it ’til you’ve tried it.

  • CapnCrumbles436

    Anyone considering themselves to be a Christian has to give pause when reading plans like this. The worst foods are foods such as….figs. You mean that God took on human flesh and taught us to eat the most unhealthy and destructive of foods? Interesting. His food was raw yogurt and HONEY(which only seems to be a medium grade sugar in your eyes). Interestingly you go on to rave about honey in later articles. Strawberries are preferable here and in another article you say to stay far from strawberries. Many of your articles take a tone which says “Whatch out everything is toxic and poisionous! In order to get the nutrients you need and enjoy optimal health you must buy MY specially formulated and extensively researched (insert product here)” I hope readers realize this guy is probably swimming in your money which was spent in desperation. I really could care less how many thousands of articles youve read or how many ‘professionals’ youve talked to, if one hasnt wisdom and discernment it amounts to nothing. Not all of what you have to say is foolishness. There is some good on here in part and parcle, but the ‘look over hear, weve broke the code! Buy our unique formula’ stuff grows tiresome. What else can I say? I already eat a largely paleo diet (if you want to call it that). This will be the first and last time I waste time on this site.

    • Joonyaboy

      The food God provided at the beginning of time is so drastically different from the food we have now. Check out “Wheat Belly” as it discusses the difference between bread from the Bible and the bread of today

  • Skattabrain

    The updated infographic is great… I wish I could print this out on a normal paper size though.

  • Loren

    went bulletproof about a week ago, coffee, organic meat and veg, pretty much zero wheat, grains, no milk. feel great! i’m in reasonably good shape, so weight not a big issue, but i feel ‘lighter’, less bloated. hate to admit this but had a sandwich pre made from a supermarket for lunch today and am sitting here with a stonking headache! never had that before……that’ll teach me for falling off the bulletproof path :/ my motivation for going BP was because i care about my health and well-being, and also because i felt ‘fuzzy’ and lacked focus most days. was really fed up with it. googled effects of caffeine, ;good coffee’, coffee sensitivity etc and eventually found my way to BP!! i really do feel a difference already, feel more energised and generally in a better mood too – its hard to quantify. My one piece of advice to any sceptics (as i naturally was) is: try it! Why not? Unless you’re a brilliant scientist, your opinions are formed from reading sites not dissimilar to this one. so drop the attitude and either give it a go for a couple weeks, no harm done, or move on! Thanks Dave!

  • Guest

    What’s wrong with microwaving ?

  • Damien

    What’s wrong with microwaving ??

  • IMjustTryin2knowHowWecantrust!

    TL;DR : I just want to “biohack” Myself just like Dave
    because I’m skeptical and want to know for sure instead of trust only.

    PS: I know It might be very tedious but I’m motivated from thinking that I had a kinda normal diet and a six pack at 11yrs old :D almost no training at all which makes me amazed @ what is possible with a flawless diet

    Come on! plz help!

  • Openminded

    I already submitted this a min ago! but it isnt anywhere cuz disqus shit is retarded!:
    Too many studies don’t agree with each other and the results are too differing for a different person.SO if i have all time and money etc I need wtf do I do then?
    ———-PS btw I completely disapprove any sweetener(stevia (prolly the least harmful)xylitol aspartame etc).Anyone who thinks they are good for you isn’t Bulletproof and should research more rather than just take all for granted.Any sweetener is mostly worse than sugar itself .

    ———Also I disapprove any amino acid loading like taking only Glutamine.Lots of studies say why each amino acid is good but they all work together very competitively for BALANCE.If only few amino acids are in the bloodstream every place where they are needed is gona have TOO MUCH of these few and too little of the rest and shit like Neurotoxicity happens. MSG is a good example:Monosodium Glutamine.It enhances flavor cuz it tricks into thinking there is lots of protein which is made of amino acids like sweetener tricks you into thinking there is lots of energy in it

    ———TL;DR Sweetener and single amino acids only cause Neurotoxicity and other shit Research!!plz dont remov dis post!!sory4 LONG post but NEEDED!

  • Daniel

    Dear Mr. Asprey. Cashews are high in carbohydrates. If you want to get into ketosis you should be aware of that. You might wanna put a little warning sign on your info graphic and into you shopping list for people who are new to this diet. ;)

    • victor

      They can also screw up your omega 6-3 ratio with the amounts of omega 6 in most nuts.

  • Pinkietoo

    My grandmother taught me to make balanced, colorful meals. The largest thing on the plate should be lean protein, balance the rest with colorful veggies, the darker, the better, this goes for fruit, too. Avoid blonde food, simple. I am almost 60 and have maintained a healthy weight my whole adult life, never dieted, never needed to.

  • Martin Lund

    As a scientist I have to say there is some serious flaws here. I spotted a few items which are simply erroneous, but probably the most irritating is the scientific ignorance. Taking relatively well established concepts and giving them equal status with popular dietary fads extrapolated from pure baloney or some isolated biochemical speculations is, as physicists would but it, not even wrong. Dietary studies are very very hard to design and perform with sufficient rigor.

  • Henrik

    Sorry but to avoid FLAX Oil is one of bullshit. This is one of the healthiest oil or even food availible (if it is cold pressed)
    Please ignore this advice…

    • Santino

      Also interested in this Question! Why do you advice avoiding FLAX? Cold pressed Flax is one of the best sources for omega 3. And especially it is surely not contaminated as fish oil often is.

      • victor

        Flax goes rancid faster than anything. Grind only what you use and use ALL of what you purchase in a short time. My guess is that is why Dave and a whole lot of nutritionists are not big on flax.

  • URtoomisinformed!

    Y U promotin fluoride?You show lots of research but NOT ENOUGH IS DONE. every coffee even your bulletproof has holes in it = fluoride.Main fluoride sources include coffee tea grapes and wine obviously water.RESEARCH URSELF! DONT JUST TRUST 1 INFOSOURCE.U should also know distillation doesnt remove it cuz it is a gas dissolved in water so it stays in water even when it is a vapor

  • colin drummond

    Wow! This is ‘hands down’ one of the most hilarious threads that I’ve ever come across.. I’m not sure to what degree the author of this article has the optimal human diet correctly figured out, or not? Certainly, the startling ignorance of the comments (& the atrocious spelling & grammar, too…I mean geeeisshh!!) made by the detractors like Pedro there, present a strong case for the view that modern wheat is probably as harmful to the human body as the current scientific paradigm expounds. Hire Pedro to disagree with your assertions, & anyone could become a convincing author! Thanks for the laughs, all!

    • victor

      Colon, I’m thinkin you’d find a conspiracy in a toothpick.

  • A supportive skeptic

    Footnote 32 links to an article from 1973 that questions, among other things, the bad press and research associated with trans fats. There must a more recent source to make the case that saturated fats do not raise cholesterol levels over time, right? Especially if “over time” gets us closer to data from this decade and its unique contexts. 40 year-old data without perspective on the negative effects of hydrogenated oils on heart health aren’t adequate proofs of contemporary health claims. Time for an update?

  • Franklin Crabbe

    To Dave and anyone who is more knowledgeable on the subject.

    Perhaps it is just my poor diet that is leading me to incoherent conclusions, but why is organic milk in the middle upper of the food ranking (assuming by this position it is neither toxic and only somewhat bulletproof) when organic butter is “bulletproof”?

    Logically, since butter is simply churned whole milk (or at least it used to be) why is one better than the other when they should be relatively similar?

    • victor

      Franklin, when many dairy countries in northern Europe live about as long as the Japanese I often wonder the same thing myself. It also makes me wonder about so many of the commenters who claim dairy makes them feel bad when whole populations thrive on it.

  • scott

    Curious…

    I understand about limiting starches and grains but why is white rice and white potatoes, etc listed as a better option than ancient grains like organic quinoa or sprouted brown rice?

  • susan

    is goat yogurt acceptable?

  • Linden

    You guys are nuts!

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  • Abed

    Three things:

    1. There are plenty of research papers which claim that saturated fat, and especially saturated fat of animal source, increase the risk for cardio-vascular diseases. Actually, I’m pretty sure they are more numerous than the papers claiming the opposite. Cherry picking research papers to fit your agenda is not “cutting edge” or scientific.

    2. There are a observational studies showing that vegans and vegetarians have lower mortality and heart disease rates than omnivores. For example, search for the Adventists 2 study.

    3. There is no uniform ideal one-size-fit-all diet. Is this diet the best for losing weight? for working out? for endurance sports? for longevity? for avoiding cancer? for skin health? and for whom? for healthy people? for people with chronic disease? with intestinal problems? with gout?

    Oh and I loved the recommendation on Maltitol.

  • Paul

    Sprouted grains like Ezekiel and greek yogurt – feedback??

  • Sarah

    The research is compelling, the radio show is amazing! I am sure this diet works for a lot of people, but if you don’t like meet and can’t afford to buy loads of fresh caught fish and seafood… I am not sure how you could get enough proteins without some of the grains/legumes…
    I couldn’t agree more on the sugar, I feel so much better since i cut almost all of the sugar from my life (except from fruits), but I do allow myself one serving of honey a day because it is so freaking delicious and makes me so happy when I eat it :) which actually brings me to my next point… the main foods in this Bulletproof diet are meat and vegetables, two very good and healthy food that I would recommend for everybody, and, well I like vegetables (mostly in their raw form) but I never liked meat very much, I have tolerated chicken breast but even that it is getting harder and harder for me to eat. It gives me no pleasure at all to eat it, and for most meat I just cannot get over the “killing an animal for food when I could eat something else that doesn’t require an animal to die” fact (yeah go ahead you can call me the “V” word). The thing is, I truly believe in clean eating and finding the right food for yourself, and while I couldn’t agree more with the fact that food is fuel for the body, I also believe that food is one of the pleasures of life, now I am not confusing pleasure and happiness but I don’t think they should be mutually exclusive either! If you love meat and eating meat gives you great pleasure then I say go for it, my husband is a carnivore that loves meat LOL! But if you don’t love meat, don’t force yourself to eat it, life is short, we shouldn’t feel disgusted by the food we put in our plate or fell forced to eat it…
    My point is the bulletproof diet is amazing and anyone out there that wants to try it GO FOR IT! I know plenty of people on Paleo (similar style diet) that love it… But if you just cannot eat all that meat… then use the tips to be able to eat the legumes (soak, ferment), replace almond flour and coconut flour in your traditional recipes requiring “wheat flour”, and if you just love those carbs so so much, do not totally deprive yourself, just be smart about it, for example stevia can replace that sugar craving in most recipes so at least the carbs in your muffins can be limited to whole grain and not sugar AND whole grain, and if you just have to have a little bit of “grain”, have them after a high intensity training (HIT) Strength session, they will replenish the glycogen lost in your muscles so you won’t have to feel bad about it!

    • victor

      Perhaps you already do but make sure you supplement with b-12 and eat 2 to 3 eggs a day. The b-12 is for the most part available naturally in meat and fish( but I get the sense you know that). More importantly, the eggs can balance the over consumption of omega-6 you’re consuming with nuts,seeds,almond flour etc.. with some omega-3.

  • http://sugamari.wordpress.com/ sugamari

    dude! the book link and the pdf link seem to be compromised – check with malwarebytes -

  • ksmith

    I’m both amused and shocked at how little we can all agree or disagree whichever the case may be over what? nutrition? It’s so apparent to me why the US is in such distress with comments such as these.

  • annabelle

    Really appreciate that you’ve put all of this meaningful information on your blog. However, after reading through for about 20 minutes, I became confused, especially at the acidophilus section. Have on outsider read it and see if they have any trouble with it. I read all day long on the internet, so just giving you my 2 cents.

  • K.Smith

    I joined and got the email but the only thing available to download was Dave’s contact info. What’s up with that? Is the graph coming later?

  • Monkee01

    Holy Moley guys, so much debate and craziness here.

    Throwing around facts and studies, proof and evidence. For every claim against something, there will be a claim in favor of it. They will both have scientific studies to back up their claims.

    I think you should eat what you want, when you want it. Pay attention to your body while you eat and after you eat. If it has negative effects on you, than perhaps take it out of your diet. Everyone responds to different foods differently.

    I feel like eating is possibly a whole lot more simple than all these arguments in the comments section make it out to be. Just gotta be mindful.

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  • CM

    Why is chicken in the yellow zone? Is it because of the low(er) fat content? Red meat tends to hit my stomach like a load of bricks so I’d love to be able to stick with fish, eggs, and chicken and still see results.

  • John Smith

    B12 deficiency has nothing to do with veggies/fruits not being a source of this nutrient, but of the soil in which they’re grown being deficient in the first place. B12 (aka Cobalomine) comes from cobalt in the soil. Deficient soil yields deficient plants. Animals, including the much praised grass fed animals, whom all eat plants, are just as likely to be grazing on deficient grass which will lead to them also lacking in cobalomine. Eating meat/eggs/dairy is no guarantee that you’re getting any B12. There are meat eaters that are just as deficient as many vegans. It’s not just a matter of one diet vs another. It’s a matter of getting back to eating what we’re meant to eat, grown in a way they were meant to be grown, in soil that is kept naturally fertile and nutrient dense. Until we do, I recommend a B12 supplement (look for Methylcobalomine, NOT Cyanocobalomine). I personally use Jarrow. Plus even the lowest dose is so high as to be overkill, so I use a pill splitter and cut them each into fourths. It’ll last quite a while.

    • victor

      Beef and fish have the highest amount of b12 and veggies are not close! They do not have to be grass fed for this particular vitamin so the info you’re giving is bogus and you’re probably a Jarrow salesman.

  • Flander

    I am nearly completely new to this and interested in the bulletproof coffee. Asprey speaks of 8 hours without need of eating whatsoever after a bulletproof coffee with MCT oil and grass-fed butter. Does this mean that eating anything else is optional or what? Shouldn´t I have lunch? I don´t get that!

  • Asprey123

    asprey has gone global. well done dave!

  • Lil

    The broscience is strong with this one…

  • Franalan.com

    Why don’t you list the % of Americans with Vitamin B12 deficiency? People are constantly attacking Vegans and Vegetarians for B deficiency but forget to mention the rest of bad eaters in the world giving people false info on healthy diets.

  • Jen

    This thread gave me some of the best laughs I have had in a long time. Thanks folks! In my nutritional exploration, I find it interesting to compare the following: a high carb/low fat frugivorous diet with a low carb/high fat carnivorous diet. I had the best overall health results from a raw, mostly vegan diet (raw fish and poached eggs once per week), but it seems few can sustain a low fat raw vegan diet with good results or discipline long term. (and a high fat raw vegan diet seems to have bad results even sooner) But why? Humans began eating like other great apes, who eat mostly fruit and greens, plus a small amount of nuts, insects, etc. Our anatomy is most similar to frugivores in nearly every category.(2) However, the creation of fire and the introduction of cooked food changed everything. It is thought to be the main change that made us truly human.(1) Cooking reduced the digestive energy required to obtain enough calories. This extra energy was used wisely: our brain size increased and our digestive tracts shortened. (1:See: “Catching Fire: How Cooked Food Made Us Human”) This may be the only trait we now share with carnivores. (2:See “80-10-10″ by Dr. Graham for a detailed list of the traits of each “vore”). We transitioned to a high meat (roughly 50%?) diet through the paleolithic period. But then, agriculture brought major changes to our diet again, shifting to grains and other foods that have a long shelf life. This advent of agriculture made it possible to sustain a rapidly growing population, though often at a large cost to our health. So, if we all decide that less carbs/more fat and ‘protein’ is better, how will the world fare? We evolved successfully cooking food and eating meat, but since paleo times, we have seen major changes with agriculture and industrialization that places us at a very different vantage point than our hunter-gatherer times. With our ballooning population and shrinking resources, how will the rest of the starving and malnourished people be able to acquire this diet? How will we/the planet provide humanely managed, grass fed, pastured meat to the billions? As we face more and more challenges to our environment and the world, a compassionate solution is needed. What will it be?

  • marco

    what with seeds like pumpkin, sesame?

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  • victor

    People, I’m seeing so much negativity here. Look around you! There’s more obesity than ever. Look at old photos from the 40s and 50s and 9 out of 10 people are thin. Put that photo next to a random photo of today and you see the difference. We ate more fat back then and were told to eat less and we complied with fat free this and fat free that and replaced that fat with good old addicting forming carbs. Now if you have a smooth running metabolism carbs can be beneficial,especially a young and athletic person. But that addicting part creeps on you and the weight comes knocking. Once this happens the metabolism changes and more and more carbs goes to fat instead of energy. You need to lower your carbs drastically! Replace them with healthy fats and it will be the smartest thing you’ll ever do. More importantly do the research yourself so you get to understand this type of eating is not some fad.

  • colin drummond

    Conspiracy in a toothpick?? That went over my head, I guess.. or it may just be that someone w/an IQ of 164 simply can’t expect to catch the humor behind the meaningless mundane mutterings from a common dolt?? Can we try keeping to comments that are thoughtful, & relevant to the subject matter? It isn’t even MY conspiracy…??? Scratch that- it’s not even a conspiracy… just a reality, or a mistake.. guess we’ll see, but whenever it becomes clear that something humans have always done, or used, or thought, is harmful or incorrect, there’s always a bunch of people w/inflexible thought patterns who can’t cope & deny the obvious. I bet toothpick dude thinks global warming is a hoax, too? Oh, & the world is also just 6000 years old, etc… Yeah, yeah, yeah… IDK why I’m bothering.. Oh well..

  • http://nakedvioletmusic.bandzoogle.com/home susie miller

    I am of the opinion that it’s not so much eating wheat as it is what kind of wheat (sprouted is best); food in general has gotten way to processed which directly impacts nutritional value and ingested toxins; cholesterol has gotten a bad rap and is mandatory for proper brain function since it is one of the main catalysts the body uses to create all the necessary hormones etc for healthy organ function, ESP the brain; percentages are just that, % of the total of what you are consuming, precision is not required accept when reading food labels…

    Your body, when fine tuned just like a fine race car, will reward you with well balanced high performance. A healthy body tells you when you are sated. Judge how your own body is doing by how you feel over time.

    An excellent way to do this is by keeping a journal to document how you feel. Over time, a pattern will emerge to show you what most benefits your body. I say this because I have done it! It helped me to recognize small changes and stick with healthier habits rather than miss the small changes that over time became huge steps to feeling better and becoming much healthier in mind, body, and spirit.

    Don’t shoot the messenger, refine the message and work towards a better you! Its your choice how you accomplish this and how quickly by your own effort.

    Sharing information is not the same as blame or fault finding. Blame does nothing to solve a problem yet effectively promotes all things negative. Why not aspire and advocate not contributing to a problem by choosing to seek solutions.

    “I have not failed. I just found 10,000 ways it won’t work!”
    –Thomas Edison

    Love and Light to you all =)

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  • DivaDietCoachDAnna

    where does wine come in? can one have red wine and how often, would it replace my fruit for the day? TY in advance.

  • Megan

    Dave often states that he ate 4500 calories a day and lost weight, while not working out or sleeping. I cant seem to find the additional details. What is an example menu of what Dave ate in a day or a week that was equal to 4500 calories. How bulletproof was Dave at during this point of experimentation? Was this in the beginning while losing all of the weight or much later in the process. Is someone who is trying to lose a lot of weight and just start out able to follow the same guidelines and shed the weight with limited sleep, exercise and 4500 calories? This info may be out there somewhere, please point me in the right direction, if it is.

  • Chris Long

    One thing is certain, these topics are rife with misinformation. There are no conclusive studies showing a benefit to reducing wheat or wheat gluten from the non-Celiac person’s diet against a placebo. Eat close to nature and we’ve been modifying the DNA of farmed foods for millennia not just recently, good news – humans digestive systems evolve as well.

  • tabani

    What about seeds pumpkin sunflower?

  • Megan

    I have been reading a lot about people using meal worms as a source of protein. I would like to hear Dave’s input on this. Where do they fit on the infograph? Being able to control the creation and growth in a lab type environment could reduce risks of toxins.

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