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Athletic Anti-Nutrition: What a Vegan Diet Really Did for Carl Lewis

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One of the most-cited vegan athlete success stories is of Carl Lewis, who credits his outstanding 1991 results in part to the vegan diet he adopted in 1990.(1) He says something that is often quoted in vegan propaganda,

“My best year of track competition was the first year I ate a vegan diet.”

The biohacker in me read that and said, “but what about the year after that?” The results are predictable, at least if you’ve read a previous post about measuring power in vegetarian athletes.  It’s also a little known fact that a high omega-6 diet masks cellular energy deficiencies for a short period of time (more on that below).

Here are the facts. Before going vegan, Lewis consistently dominated both sprinting and the long jump. After the heights reached in 1991, only 1 year after starting the vegan diet, Lewis started to lose his dominance in both the sprints and the long jump.

In 1992, he failed to qualify for the Olympic team in the 100 m or 200 m. Lewis did, however, qualify for the long jump and was eligible for the 4 x 100 m relay team. The vegan diet was starting to take its toll. Then in the 1992 Olympics, he ran a very fast 4 x 100 relay and won the long jump, but with a shorter jump than in previous years. He was unable to compete in his formerly strongest events – the 100m  and 200 m sprints.

Then in 1993, Lewis competed at the 4th World Championships in Stuttgart, but finished fourth in the 100 m sprint and did not even compete in the long jump. He did win a bronze in the 200 m sprint, which was his final Olympic or World Championship medal in a running event.

Starting in 1994, injuries kept Lewis largely sidelined for the next few years.

An impartial observer would say, “Here is a world class athlete who was performing very well across the board. Then he went vegan, had one great year, got progressively less consistent, and then was sidelined by injuries.”

Here’s the reason I believe this happened, courtesy of Steve Fowkes, a friend and one of the wisest biochemists I’ve ever known, and author of Smart Drugs & Nutrients II, one of the “bibles” of cognitive enhancement. Steve writes: (bolding is mine)

Unfortunately, the benefits to consuming a PUFA-containing product  do not counteract the rancid-oil exposure.  Furthermore, the non-rancid PUFAs deposit in the fatty tissues and cell membranes of the body where they become targets for oxygen free radicals.  This is the bad side.  The good side is that the PUFAs promote membrane fluidity and membrane permeability, which has a pro-metabolic effect that is in some ways similar to that generated by thyroid hormone, progesterone, exercise, vitamin D, vitamin A (not beta-carotene), magnesium and selenium (and other agents).  But because it mimics the effects of these other agents, there can be perceived benefits that are not truly biologically sustainable.  In other words, there is a perceived health change for the better, but itn to believe a vegan diet contributed to his rapid decline.

  • Higher protein intake has consistently shown to produce better training adaptations.(2)(3)(SVHI.com meetings. The sad thing is that the most competitive, hardest working people who try vegan diets tend to stick with them the longest, for the simple reason that they remember how good the first 3 months felt. When their performance – and then health – decline, they convince themselves that it couldn’t be the vegan diet, because of how good it made them feel. So they suffer while they try to figure out all the other reasons their quality of life is gradually declining, but they do not make the connection.

    I call this the vegan trap – it’s a naturally occurring phenomena that takes advantage of the fact that behavior changes we stick to for 40 days (or 6 weeks) tend to become permanent, and the unfortunate fact that what is a fundamentally unhealthy diet makes you feel good for a time longer than 40 days. It’s the same psychological mechanism behind drug addiction.

    We don’t know with certainty exactly why Carl Lewis’ performance began to decline.  Maybe it was age, loss of enthusiasm, or simply better competition.  However, there is good reason to believe a vegan diet contributed to his rapid decline.

    • Higher protein intake has consistently shown to produce better training adaptations.(2)(3)(4)  A vegan diet isn’t zero protein, but it almost always ends up being deficient.(5)
    • Vegans and vegetarian are likely to be anemic and “have lower mean muscle creatine concentrations than do omnivores, and this may affect supramaximal exercise performance.”  Both of these things are going to impair athletic performance, and in the case of the latter, especially sprint performance.(6)
    • A vegetarian diet decreases muscle carnosine stores which are needed for optimal sprinting performance.(7)
    • 80% of long term vegans are deficient in vitamin B12, which is needed for proper mental function.(8)  B12 deficiency causes dementia, cognitive impairment, depression, and degenerative mental disorders.(9) None of these are going to improve your sports performance.

    So when it comes to the vegan diet, “Just Say No.” And remember that eating grass-fed meat kills far FEWER animals than a vegan grain-based diet, because there are no “tractor kills” in grass-fed agriculture. Behind every vegan hot dog are dozens of fuzzy mice, cute bunnies, turtles, snakes, and bugs that were mowed down by tractors and farm equipment. A cow-based Bulletproof Diet kills 0.7 animals a year, including agriculture-related deaths, and it makes you healthier and stronger so you can do more in the world.

    Some background research for this post may have been conducted by other Bulletproof staff researchers.

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  • Trevor

    Hey guys, I wanted to ask your opinion on something.

    I heard an interveiw with Dr. Bruce Fife and the subject of oil pulling got brought up
    I was wondering what you guys thought of oil pulling with coconut/MCT oil as a maintenance program to handle extra toxins?

    Thanks guys.

  • http://twitter.com/RadiantLux RadiantLux

    This article matches what I have been reading about health for years. All-vegetable diets have a short term purpose for detox and cleansing but is not intended for long term use. I did a TCM all-vegetable diet coupled with qigong for 6 weeks. The early weeks were rough and made me sleepy at work. After a while I was surprised that I could live on only vegetables, fruits and nuts. http://tinyurl.com/74sucb6

  • http://giryagirl.myopenid.com/ Adrienne

    Interesting as I was very strict vegan for a year (a long time ago) and the first 3-6 months were great – after that I had to drop my activity level way down, and was experiencing immune problems and difficulties dealing with stress. Not to mention some seriously poor decision making.

    • http://armilegge.com Armistead Legge

      I believe it. B12 deficiency was probably a major contributor. I hope you’re feeling better now :)

      • Vegans4Truth!

        B12 deficiency in 3 months after going Vegan! :P come on.. at least read a little bit of how B12 works before claiming something like that.. even if you didn’t get enough B12 as a vegan due to lack of insight in what it takes to have a balanced Vegan diet.. it would take years to show! just google it and you will understand..^

        • Jml

          Its a lot more than B12 deficiency. Not enough protein and no real way to get B12 and don’t say yeast supplements because the real thing IS FAR BETTER AND supplements ARE WORTHLESS!!!!

  • Rougeandpeasantslave

    In a year you only eat 70% of one cow? I assumed that you ate more meat than that. And you don’t eat any fish? Where does this 0.7 animals a year number come from?

    • Dave Asprey

      An average 1,150 lb. steer yields a 714 lb. carcass. Approximately 146 lbs. of fat and bone are trimmed off leaving about 568 lbs. of retail beef cuts. Plus I eat the fat when I can get it too. So 0.7 cows = more than 1 pound of beef every day for a year.
      In truth, I often eat more than that, closer to 1.5 – 2 lbs, especially when I was keeping to the 4,000 to 4500 calorie plan for 2 years. The experiment is done now, but I still do at least a pound a day, usually closer to 1.5.

      • Fooljeff

        Thanks dave I was wondering about that as well!

      • Zorica

        I am curious as to why you finished the experiment? Two years is a long time anyway, but was it to make it more affordable and that your point was proven anyway? Or simply because you have moved on to other experiments.

        • Dave Asprey

          I wanted to apply some of my “recovery” reserves to improving health more, not just working on stuff. I still hack my sleep, I vary my food intake more, and I play with other stuff.

  • Jim

    This calls into question the common practice in the paleo-sphere of “30 day trials.” I guess we have to take our 30-day results with a grain of salt.
    A dietary change that brings benefits after 30-days could later cause problems, and a change that causes problems after 30-days might later bring benefits. For the purposes of analysis, we want the body to operate in a linear, short term fashion, but that’s not the way it works.

    • http://armilegge.com Armistead Legge

      Very good observation Jim. I think the 30 day trials, or whatever you want to call them are still valuable, but you always have to be willing to change your plans if they aren’t working.

  • http://twitter.com/OfHealthBeauty Elvira Bornich

    Arachidonic Acid, found in all animal products, is a major cause of inflammation, especially the one caused by COX-1 and 5-LOX enzymes, which are responsible for prostate cancer. In fact, prostate cancer has been directly linked to the consumption on meat and other animal products. As well as bowel cancer. There are plenty of scholar articles on pubmed and various med schools if you just google “arachidonic acid + cancer”. So, I’d go easy on beef if I were you ;)

    That said, I’m not vegan or even strict vegetarian, but I do not eat meat or dairy.

    • http://armilegge.com Armistead Legge

      It’s true polyunsaturated fats of any kind can add to inflammation, but the small amounts in meat haven’t been shown to cause problems. You can google for “cholesterol+heart disease” and find a lot of articles too, most of them being complete nonsense.

    • http://loveyourmother.livejournal.com/ LYM

      Every study I have ever personally looked up on the relationship between beef and ANY disease has had a control problem. Typically, the participants are in two groups: “not allowed to eat meat” and “allowed to eat meat”. The second group is typically consuming normal Standard American Diet amounts of the worst meat possible – fast food, TV dinners, processed meats full of chemicals & neurotoxins, & factory farmed meats.

      In any where the meat eaters eat only pastured or wild meats, there is no disease association, period. This is consistent with the observations of what nourished mankind over hundreds of millennia.

    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=693487038 Josh Almanza

      STOP reading just abstracts, and start reading the full text. These studies don’t have the best methodology. Methodology makes or breaks a study. I don’t think a pepperoni pizza is meat. Do you? What about fast food like taco bell? Their meat has fillers like oats, wheat, soy, and many toxic compounds. Some of these scientists doing these studies know nothing about nutrition.

      • http://twitter.com/OfHealthBeauty Elvira Bornich

        I do read full texts – it’s my job. I am well aware of the defference between good quality meat and processed meat and the fact that some studies disregard correct nutrition. However, this is not what I wrote about. I mentioned one compound – Arachidonic Acid – that is found in all animal products, such as meat, eggs and dairy, and in slightly less quantities in fish – regardless of its quality. Now the link between this acid and those inflammation enzymes is well-established and the studies that has been done on it are varied and quite accurate.

        Yes, PUFAs in large amounts can cause inflammation too, but their effect on COX-1 and 5-LOX is not as drastic comparing to Arachidonic Acid.

        I guess moderation is the key here. Eating 3-5 walnuts for breakfast won’t do any damage as well as eating a steak twice a week I suppose. Eating beef 3 times a day every day, like on so popular now Paleo diet for example, definetely will.

        • Dave Asprey

          And are you aware that children who do NOT get arachidonic acid in their diet do not develop their brains properly? Dosing of DHA (omega 3 fish oil) along with AA is more effective than just DHA alone.
          Fatty acid degradation pathways are complex. Oversimplifying to “AA is bad” will not lead to optimal human potential. Too much is bad. Too little is bad.

        • Lou

          Arachidonic acid is NOT one of the essential fatty acids. It is needed by our body but we can make it from linoleic acid which is found in vegetable oils.

  • Tiger0

    LOL @ this article… I have been vegan for over 8 years and I can out-do plenty of people my age… which goes to say that by 1993 Carl Lewis was 32, of course he was not the same. Look just like if you are eating meat, you still have to eat right… you just can’t eat whatever you want and expect to perform at a great level.

    • http://armilegge.com Armistead Legge

      We never said that.

      • N

        ‘Tiger’ is not suggesting you did. The comparison is this: veganism doesn’t stipulate what you DO eat, it stipulates what you DON’T eat. So just as an animal products-eater can have a good diet or a bad diet, so can a non-animal products eater. If someone pointed out an obese person coming out of a burger shop with a hamburger, and said ‘look, they eat meat, it’s clearly bad’, you’d say – they may eat meat, but they’ve got a shocking diet, hence obesity. Same as if you point out a skinny, shriveled person who happens to be vegan and say ‘look, they don’t eat meat, so meat must be necessary’, a vegan can say back, well, no, they just have a shocking diet.

        • Marco Ermini

          That’s exactly what many vegans do… BTW…

        • Giovanni Campanella

          He already said that.

  • Space

    It’s weird how you write
    “A vegan diet isn’t zero protein, but it almost always ends up being deficient.(5)”, but that study behind the “(5)” doesn’t back up your claim at all.
    it just says protein intake should be adjusted from 0.8 to about 1.0 g/kg.
    It’s clearly dishonest to make claims that you back up with links that don’t actually back them up.

    • http://armilegge.com Armistead Legge

      Most of the research indicates power and strength athletes like Carl Lewis need at least 2.5-3.0 grams/kg of protein a day. The RDI as never meant to account for athletes, and the study in question shows most vegetarians don’t consume nearly enough for athletic goals. Here’s a case of a vegetarian athlete who almost died from not eating enough protein

      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19661778

      • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_Y5RI6GL3PZRYM6VUR7Q2AUJXZ4 D

        The article does not say that the vegetarian athlete “almost died from not eating enough protein.” The authors said that his was a “poorly planned vegetarian diet.” A well-planned vegetarian diet is not difficult.

        Your references in this article don’t say what you claim they say, in several cases.

        • Davidl

          Ditto. In fact the research paper concludes with this:

          “A vegetarian diet per se is not associated with detrimental effects in athletes, but an optimal protein intake should be achieved through careful planning with an emphasis on protein-rich plant foods.”

          Keep in mind that just like athletic meat eaters who regularly take protein supplements (which are almost always vegi-based) to bolster their intake, so can vegans or vegetarians if desired.

  • Johnny

    These publications point to vegetarians and vegans who were deficient in protein, B12, or planned their diets poorly. It’s quite possible to be a healthy and vibrant vegan by focusing on protein rich plants, supplement protein if necessary, supplement B12, and eat healthy food. Too many vegans out there eat crap and give veganism a bad name. I am a cyclist and vegan. My protein levels and B12 levels are fine and I can do 40+ mile rides with plenty of energy left over. A vegan diet is not just for detoxing. It’s a very good diet if you pay attention to what you are eating, which is just as important for non vegans. There are just as many meat eaters suffering from poor diet as their are vegans suffering from poor diets. Let’s not throw out the baby with the bathwater.

    • Dave Asprey

      Johnny, the whole point of The Bulletproof Executive is to spot the “babies in the bathwater” (like butter, or grass fed meat vs factory meat) with the goal of being more bulletproof. The problem is that when we filtered out all the bathwater around vegan diets, we found that there wasn’t a baby left. The most hard-core health conscious vegan will perform worse over time than a similarly focused Bulletproof Diet user. They will also significantly contribute to environmental degradation of topsoil, and waste precious resources carting around low-value low-nutrient foods that are mostly water and starch.

      • Torvum

        Uhm, you do realize that cows eat more grains than vegans do, right? And that cows contribute more green house producing gasses than anything? And that 97% of soy cultivation – the kind responsible for Amazon deforestation – is for livestock feed? Please, do your research before trashing vegans.

        • Gladina Vuletic

          The conventionally raised cattle; yes, they will eat many grains.

          Grass fed cows would have a better nutrient profile of course. In my opinion (and maybe contrary to Dave’s and others) it is still better to eat at least some protein even if it’s from grain fed (but it’s sad I know). Eating more seafood will help offset this.

          No matter what a cow eats for diet (as in grains/grass) the way it metabolizes such food is different from humans. Their systems turns the food into free fatty acids and other such fatty acid based metabolism so that they are running on fat metabolism, not starch or sugar. However if human eats ‘grass’ (as in starch and sugars) it is metabolized into sugars and not fatty acids (well maybe after some fasting…). You see how it’s different, yes?

          Ok so for those who are wanting to have as good of a diet as possible while still living on small budget I can tell you some tricks. Learn some supplements which are helpful to YOU (this takes time) b/c I found it is cheaper to afford certain supplements over trying to purchase grass-fed and organic vegetables for every meal. It’s counter-intuitive, but it works out cheaper (for budget).

          Of course I would like the day that I can afford 100% grass fed meat, 100% wild caught/fresh seafood and 100% organic vegetables (although in summer I can just have my own garden at least, but not in winter).

        • Nasko

          Uhm, do you realize that once the bisons were more than the present day cows in USA and may have greater impact on green house gasses?

        • Boba Fett

          Are you suggesting that the situation pre-agriculture/civilization somehow was unsustainable due to green house gasses from the animals living there then???

        • Boba Fett

          Nobody denies this. Industrial farming that grows grains to feed animals that we later eat is a tremendous waste, not to mention the horrible conditions under which they live. There is not one sane person on earth who can justify this. But what people don’t realize is that we’re probably f*cked anyway if we continue with a monocrop agriculture (what we’ve been doing for the last 10000 years). Ever since the birth of agriculture we’ve been living out of balance with the earth, taking more than we should. We have been able to produce more food than we need which have raised the human population way beyond the long time carrying capacity of the earth. Since the discovery of artificial fossil fueled fertilizers after WWII (it’s basically bomb technology) and the “green revolution” (talk about a misleading name), the destruction has accelerated and everything points to a gruesome end to humanity and possible most of life on earth. Agriculture combined with our current industrial civilization rapes the earth and will leave nothing except a sterile salt desert when we are done. As vegans I know you are highly conscious people regarding things like equal rights, environment, sustainability. Don’t look blindly at the meat industry and think that once that is solved we will have a functioning balanced food production where everyone lives happily ever after eating grains and plants.

          Of course the objection is, if not agriculture then what should we eat? Anything that grows from sunlight and natural rain. That doesn’t leave much, except for the animals that actually can eat grass and other plants that naturally thrive without human intervention.

          To actually think there is a sustainable civilization that is industrial, global, free market, democratic looking roughly like today, keeping the good parts and rejecting the negative (war, environmental destruction, slavery, poverty etc etc.) is highly questionable. What if one is not possible without the other and we basically have to go back to hunter gatherer communities to save the earth. How many of you think this will happen?

          My outlook for the future is bleak. When I was a kid I envisioned Star Trek, now I see The Road. I hope I will be proven wrong.

        • Giovanni Campanella

          You’re confused about what a free market is; a free market is simply free trade with a government that only protects individual and property rights (fraud, theft, etc.). The market is where innovation and ideas can spring up freely and with least amount of resistance from mob mentality through the violence of central authority. This is how the best and most sustainable ideas will come about. When things get pushed to rarity, prices naturally rise. When you use the state to subsidize them (meat industry and non organic farms) you get over consumption and artificial growth. We also do not live in a free market at all, we have a pseudo free market that is control by the government. Not just regulations, but the entire money supply and interest rates are controlled by the government. That’s like calling a human body a human body without a brain or a heart. We do not live in a free market society.

          Nothing I say validates anything said by the right wing, they support free markets superficially. They don’t even know what it is, they just talk about it and don’t realize that they do not.

  • Eprince44

    Hello. My name is E. Prince, The Naturopath. I am the Masters World Champion in the 400m and I also run Collegiate track and Field at the age of 42. I changed my diet a little over 7 years ago to prove that you can slow down the aging process. What I discovered is that you can reverse the aging process. We are on the evolutionary upswing. That means that we have reached our limit on the consumption of animal flesh. It was only meant to be temporary. Man is returning to his original Diet as onlined in Genesis 1:29-30. The time is now to begin changing the way we eat that we may reverse the traditional bloodline diseases. You will not be able to avoid any disease that you are predisposed to unless you change your lifestyle of eating. Isaiah made reference to prophesy concerning the end of eating meat and the consequences that will follow in Isaiah 65:17-25. It take knowledge of your body and it’s nutritional needs to be a successful vegan/competitor. For this reason, I have created the AGE REVERSAL DETOX program. One account doesn’t prove anything except that the body takes time to transition. Sometimes years. Check me out on http://www.facebook.com/eprince77

  • Brock in HK

    Interesting post. I follow the sport of squash closely and just learned that current world #1 James Willstrop is a vegetarian and has been since about 2009 (best evidence from a Google search), so about 2-3 years now.

    I’m not sure how close to vegan he is, but it will make it more interesting to see how this year progresses for him, given that he’s still in his prime and should have at least 3-4 more good years to stay at the top, if not more. At 28, he’s 3 years younger than his archrival Nick Matthew (world #2 by a hair in the points total) and a good 7 years younger than perennial squash tour presence Thierry Lincou (a Frenchman who presumably eats plenty of meat).

    • Dave Asprey

      Thanks Brock! This is interesting to follow. We need to find a Bulletproof (or at least Paleo-esque) athlete to compare in the same sport. A focused obsessively compared vegetarian diet high in eggs and butter and whey but low in toxins may be better than a sloppy factory meat based Standard American Diet athlete. There are almost no pure vegan athletes who can pull this off – the vegan diet over long periods of time is another form of stress on the body. The optimal diet for performance that I am aware of is the Bulletproof Diet (obviously!) with modifications based on sport (ie more Bulletproof carbs on some training days, but not all), and with Bulletproof fasting, and an occasional low protein day.

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  • Chlselyn

    The China Study is far more convincing for me than this. Since 2005, I have gradually eaten less animals products, and now eat only a few dairy products and maybe an occasional egg. My health, as well as my fitness level has only gotten better as my animal protein decreased. That’s what– 7 years? I’m not really against the killing of animals, I just don’t like the way they’re raised (and I know that ‘organic’ and ‘free range’ mean absolutely nothing when it comes to regulations.) I think that the long term effects seen in the 20 year studies of the China Study are more revealing and more personally convincing. A Dr, who is not trying to sell any diet or products, who just wants to help people get healthy. Check it out– http://www.thechinastudy.com/about.html

    • Dave Asprey

      We had one of the lead supporters of The China Study in to http://www.svhi.com a while back. Not compelling at all. http://rawfoodsos.com/2010/08/03/the-china-study-a-formal-analysis-and-response/ really explains in detail many of the flaws in the book, from statistical to logical error.
      I’ve read the book, twice. The most glaring error is that Campbell associates casein problems with all animal products. Other problems are that he doesn’t account for meat storage problems in China (see my work on mycotoxins on this blog for reasons why that matters for cancer) and he doesn’t account for Chinese cooking techniques (high heat = denatured protein)
      The list goes on and on. The China Study is not a quality, reference-worthy book.
      As for it being written by someone with nothing to sell, that’s not true either. Campbell is very clear that he was already a vegan animal-rights supporter. He had a religious conviction to sell, and I believe it caused him to bend the truth to fit his reality, whether he’s conscious of that or not. His claims are not borne out by his data.

  • Barry Gourmet

    Some interesting comments and observations made on this site.
    This is my personal experience with vegan ,vegetarianism , and the typical SAD American diet.
    In short my weight was over 120 pounds over my ideal body weight more than 30 years ago on the SAD diet plus I was not moving my body.

    Then I went vegan for 4 years with whole foods not junk foods or processed foods. I lost over half my body weight in a 2 year time frame and all the associated chronic symptoms just disappeared from my body over time.

    I was feather weight light and fast with lots of energy with a clear mind .
    But in the fourth year things started to change as my endurance and strength waned .After getting a full CBC complete blood count with different labs I discovered that I was very low in my vitamin B 12 and,borderline anemic, so I transitioned over to a more plant based diet that included the best free range grass fed organic animal proteins in moderation.And wild fish not farm raised. I noticed after this that I regained some of my power strength and energy back.

    I would like to add that the people living in the 5 Blue Zones around the world today live well into longevity of 100 years or more according to studies conducted from the National Geographic Society magazine.I think we can all learn something from these long lived people they really have the answer.

    My life with resources and great tasting plant based Earth Recipes can be found at http://www.flickr.com/photos/54619340@N07/

    Kindest Regards

    Barry Gourmet & raw

    • Dave Asprey

      Barry, thanks for sharing your experiences! So many former vegans have come to this site and approached me in person. I was a vegan for a while too. It can be useful for short periods, but over long time frames, it’s not sustainable for optimal health and performance. Your focus on raw is good – raw vegan for a month at a time once a year is something I’d support, especially if it’s low fructose raw vegan.

  • http://www.stellametsovas.com/ Stella Metsovas B.S., CCN

    My “vegan years” were single handily the worst physiological years of my life. Assuming I was a proper vegan during my upper-division coursework in foods science / nutrition was my biggest mistake. Add excessive cardiovascular training–you have the perfect storm. I’m very mindful of my sources of animal-based proteins; only consuming organic, pasture raised chicken and turkey, plus fish that are low in mercury.

    • http://armilegge.com Armistead Legge

      I’m sorry you had to go through that Stella. We hear similar stories from a lot of people. What convinced you to give up veganism?

  • Barry Gourmet & Raw

    You will not believe this but many notable health experts that practiced a 100% vegan diet before are now giving up this practice and why is that?
    Because they listen to their bodies far more than the average consumer and something is missing in their pursuit of ultimate wellness and health.
    I know it happened to me more than 25 years ago when I broke a 4 year whole food Vegan diet. Did you know in some cases an expert holistic oncologist will sometimes force their patient to take in some animal proteins to build up their immunity which is really the true weapon against all Cancers. Conventional Cancer treatments promote Cancer , and destroy the patients immunity but this fact is down played by the Oncologist because after all they need to feed the profiteering machine that was started years ago in the yearly 20th century by the Rockefeller family and associates . Of course the common man on the street is never allowed to know the truth as this would be a Pharmaceuticals worst nightmare if publicly on mass the truth was to be known.
    Barry Gourmet & Raw

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  • Andre Ortiz

    Since 1993, Lewis has suffered from arthritis. Nothing to do with Veganism. Stick to the facts.

    • Dave Asprey

      Give me a break. Arthritis is a disease of inflammation. omega 6 oils from vegetables contribute to inflammation. Case closed.

      • JaxonCambridge

        Wow, you are good at making up stuff aren’t you.

        • Dave Asprey

          Making up the truth is so much easier isn’t it?

  • JaxonCambridge

    I’m now wondering how you explain the success of long time vegan athletes such as Scott Jurek, one of the greatest ultramarathoners ever, and Noah Hannibal, one of the strongest persons on Australia?

    • Dave Asprey

      Let’s see how they do over time, and whether either of them drops dead unexpectedly.

      • JaxonCambridge

        According to your article they should have suffered after 3 months. Jurek somehow managed to win the Western States 100 seven years in a row on a vegan diet.

        • Dave Asprey

          That’s what I love about statistical anomalies.

          As I’ve stated several times, you can use junk exercise to counter the effects of a vegan diet for a while. Let’s see what he looks like in another 5 years or 10 years. Endurance athletes on low-fat diets tend to die of heart attacks at young ages.

        • JaxonCambridge

          Which low fat vegan athletes have died young of heart attacks.

        • GregoryWebber

          Have ANY low fat vegan athletes died young of heart disease?

        • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_Y5RI6GL3PZRYM6VUR7Q2AUJXZ4 D

          I’d love to see the documentation for that claim. Is there any?

        • Davidl

          Really, the man has already ready dominated what could arguably be considered the most grueling athletic event there is (junk exercise, let’s see you run 100 miles) for 7 years straight and you say lets wait let’s wait another 5-10 years, he’s bound to lose it sooner or later due to his diet!

          There have been more than enough world class vegetarian and vegan athletes to make it clear it works.

          Instead of wasting your time trying to disprove there is a segment of the population who can thrive as vegans (it will get you no where) why don’t you put all that energy into counseling the nearly third of the children in this county who are now obese, they can really use your help.

        • Ryan

          A TINY segment, and SO RARE that they excel in their given sporting/athletic endeavors. Compared to meat eating athletes in their same disciplines, there is NO comparison.

          Read The Vegetarian Myth, then return and report.

        • Giovanni Campanella

          Yeah but the fact is that they are vegan or vegetarian. They are already a smaller population. You’re emotionally attached to your diet just like all humans are, so you are just attacking it and basing your thinking around these feelings. Just like liberals attack libertarians, or religious people attack atheists. This article is bogus, I don’t care what you eat or what you believe.

        • Laurie

          He’s not doing so well lately. He’s complained of severe muscle pain several times in the last few years and quit a race in May due to it. He discusses overcoming pain quite often. It doesn’t seem like the man is in great health at all, he’s all about ignoring the pain and apparently, his vegan diet isn’t helping him with it.

          Ultra-marathoners have higher rates of cancer and heart disease too.

  • Richie.

    Despite the convincing nature of the article, I beg to differ. The author does stress that it only applies to a “grain based” diet. However it’s emphasis is clearly on ALL Vegan diets. I believe his opposition to the Vegan way is plain to see. I am assuming, but given the intelligent style of his piece he must be aware of the grainless Vegan diet. As championed by such people as Doug Graham. However he chooses to omitt this from the article. I am not knocking the Author in any way. All I wish to say is that, from what I’ve witnessed in myself and many others, a Vegan diet, which is raw, organic and grainljess in nature, is not only performance enhancing to athletes, but an utterly healthy and naturalistic one also. Why did Lewis’s performances decline? Who can say? But, I would suggest, most fervently but humbly, that his diet played little or no role in his decline.
    york-windsor@gmx.com

    • Dave Asprey

      I was a grainless raw vegan for several months. Very few people over 30 can get away with it, and the ones I know do not look well at all. It’s a question of fatty acids and the excess omega 6 and lack of omega 3 that gets vegans, grainless or not.

  • http://twitter.com/MediaActivist Jay Baker

    While grain-fed livestock production has us in a world where 5lbs of grain produces a mere 1lb of meat and impoverishes nations, aside from the grass grazing land for a promoted meat diet as this, there’s a real sense of false concern here: “Tractors accidentally kill animals, whereas we kill them on purpose because meat is GOOD for you!” If the heart disease and cancer rates aren’t enough evidence for you, then the idea that we don’t need meat – at all – to thrive and be healthy should be. I step on bugs every day walking over fields, but it doesn’t mean I might as well go and blowtorch my neighbour’s dog.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=05zhL1YUd8Q
    http://www.abolitionistapproach.com/media/links/p90/simon-the.pdf

    • Dave Asprey

      False logic. You DO need meat to live in optimal health, and since that produces the lowest deaths per calorie, it’s the only ethical way to eat.

      • Gregory Webber

        You keep writing that we need to eat meat to live in optimal health and yet provide no evidence to support your claim. At the same time vegans are proving that vegan diets enhances sporting perfomance and a meat based died has been shown many times to lead to an early death.

        Have you read any of the recent results of the Harvard Nurses Health Study yet? Pretty damning of diets which include animal products.

        • Dave Asprey

          Grass-fed animal products were not studied in the Nurses Study, sorry.

        • Gregory Webber

          Do you have any proof that grass feed beef is less harmful. Nearly all beef in Australia is grass feed and heart disease and stroke are still the biggest killers

        • http://www.facebook.com/josh.alterman Josh Alterman

          This guy doesn’t care about truth or science. He just is trying to justify his actions to defend his ego. Seen it a zillion times.

        • Christopher G.

          This is a spurious argument. Health is a dynamic factor of variables and foodstuffs, as well as toxin levels, pollution, stress, sleep patterns, etc. To claim that any one particular diet is best for all persons is reductionist and flies in the face of the entire field of biochemical individuality. That being said, Australians polled are also some of the highest consumers of grain-based foods and simple sugars. Beer, is in fact one of their modern dietary staples. This is pandering akin to the falsities of the 7 country study that kicked off most of this “accepted” falsehood. High sugar content of food relates the most to health degradation and especially heart disease and cancers. This is now widely accepted by the National Institutes of Health (whom originally condemned the high saturated/cholesterol diets). This is PROVEN in the original China study, which Campbell DID NOT REPORT. In fact, the levels of mortal cancer rates amongst animal meat eaters was 3 percent, whereas FIBER was seen as a correlation in 24% of cancer mortality levels. It is also proven on a scientifically anecdotal level- Cancers grow in fructose and glucose baths… they do not grow in ketogenic environments. Heart disease and stroke are functions of small dense ldl cholesterols becoming puffy in the arteries… this is a function of fructose metabolism in the liver.

        • Laurie

          It isn’t anywhere NEAR true that most beef in Oz is grass-fed.

      • http://www.facebook.com/josh.alterman Josh Alterman

        Lots of claims. Zero evidence. Yawn.

    • Laurie

      What is a meat diet?

  • Davidl

    With all due respect Dave you may be a highly accomplished entrepreneur, but based on this article you clearly know very little about athletic performance. Track and field athletes have their peak performance years in their early 20′s *, yet at the age of 31 when sprinters and long jumpers are long past their prime and usually found on the sofa watching the Olympics, Carl somehow manage to not only be in the Olympics but to win 2 gold medals (4×100 & long jump, his 3rd!). At the time this was, and still is, considered one of the outstanding performances of all time.

    The honest question should be how is it that at the age of 31 when he should have been a has been, he managed to still be the best in the world at two events? Well even you admit his vegan diet improved his performace during that time period but then you go on to say because he did not sustain this dominace over the next several yrs his diet is to blame. Come on Dave , to say his diet was the factor in slowing him down 10yrs AFTER his physical peak is absurd as it completely ignores the effects of aging on athletic performance. Shame on you for making such an obvious blunder.

    Oh, and you somehow forgot to mention that four years later (still a vegan) in the ’96 Olympics at the ripe old age of 35 he once again won the gold in the long jump, which is simply astounding.

    On another note you trash the China Study yet where are the studies tracking thousands of people over 5,10 or 20 years that support your claims. Heck, I don’t even dispute that what you preach may be true, but the few dozen (or even few hundred) people you’ve “heard from” do not prove anything. For every person who tells you their anti vegan story how many are there out there who are thriving as vegan, truth is you have absoluty no way of knowing.

    Until you have well documented long term proof to support your opinions they are just that, opinions.

    BTW, I really love the way you explain anything that does not support your view as an anomaly, how convenient !

    *Peak performance and age among super athletes. Shultz & Curnow 1998

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_Y5RI6GL3PZRYM6VUR7Q2AUJXZ4 D

    Nice. Your reference for your claim that says that vegetarians and vegans are likely to be anemic says “non-anemic.” Hmmm. That means that they do not tend to be anemic, not that they tend to be anemic. Anemia rates are about the same for vegans and meat-eaters.

  • Bokchevist

    A study worth reading on the beneficial effects of a mostly plant based diet.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10687887

    Just two extracts :

    “A vegan diet has documented clinical efficacy in rheumatoid arthritis.”

    “An unnecessarily high intake of essential amino acids–either in the absolute sense or relative to total dietary protein–may prove to be as grave a risk factor for ‘Western’ degenerative diseases as is excessive fat intake.”

    • Laurie

      I’m an omnivore and my diet is plant-based. I get the bulk of my calories from plants, which is what plant-based actually means. I also eat meat every day.

  • VegansAreOnlyTryingToHelp

    You keep mentioning long term health. Ever heard of heart disease, bone disease, prostate cancer, breast cancer, colon cancer? 95% of those patients ate meat their entire lives. and most would be dead without a doctor to save them.
    Those are fatal health problems. Now compare the death rates to a community that has never consumed an animal product. You can’t so how is anything you say relevant?
    Science and common sense both PROVE that we are built as herbivores. Our digestive system is not meant to digest meat. Look in the damn mirror. You are being suckered by greedy people killing innocent beings for profit. And you are killing yourself slowly but surely. Carl Lewis will have less health problems over his life than almost every meat eater. I would bet my life on that.

    • Pete

      Hey, I’m a vegan, but er just to point out, I wouldn’t tout ’95% of those patients ate meat their entire lives’ as evidence of anything, because in Western countries, 95% of the entire population have eaten meat their entire lives, so really all that’s saying is you get sick no matter what you eat. Which we know isn’t true, especially for heart disease and bone diseases. So re-evaluate the statistic ;)

    • Marco Ermini

      LOL. 100% of people with cancer drank water in ther life. So that must be the reason.

  • HaveWeAllGoneMad

    An extremely biased article!

    Why eat meat that sits in your stomach for hours on end rotting, waiting for your body to break it down only to reassemble it back into protein? It is much more efficient to eat complete amino acid proteins in foods like Spirulina, Chlorella, Amaranth, Buckwheat, Hemp seed and Quinoa.

    Milk is also a disaster for the body as all mammals stop producing lactase as small children (This is called weaning which most humans strangly don’t do!) which means we don’t digest it properly (Were not meant to!) certainly not milk from some other species which is designed to turn small calfs into huge bulls (Thats before all the artificial stuff they put in) Where do cows get their nutrition to make this stuff? PLANTS!

    Drinking milk is not natural! (Unless your a baby drinking from its mother)

    Look at all our ancestors, Gorillas, Orangutans etc they are almost all herbivores even Chimps eat very little meat in the wild.

    Carnivores like cats have very little energy from the body having to digest meat which is why the lie around all day in the shade.

    Why do most protein powders and shakes not contain meat if it is “essential” for protein.

    As for the comments that Vegans actually harm more animals that people eating “grass fed meat” – ridiculous to say the least, consider the rainforests around the world being destroyed to graze Cattle for Mans greed for consuming flesh, just one of many points but this article is about nutrition not morals right?….

    • Laurie

      Where do people get such ridiculous ideas? Basic biology in HS teaches us that meat is easy to digest and is digested faster than vegetations and grains where nutrition is encapsulated in indigestible cellulose. Any further digestion depends on hind-gut fermentation which human beings are not well-designed for… but either way, the hind-gut would be the COLON. Meat is already long digested before it reaches the colon. In human beings, the small intestine is more than twice as long as the colon. In apes, the colon is more than twice as long as the small intestine, meaning human beings don’t have the same digestive ability to break down lots of vegetation.

      Also, people are NOT descended from gorillas, orangutans or chimpanzees, nor are they descended from us.

      Geeze, when you need even the most basic stuff explained to you, it puts your credibility at serious question.

    • Jack

      I’m 56 and have been a Vegan since I was 19 and a Raw food Vegan for 5 years. I am in super tip top health, still play an awful lot of extreme sports and am a lot stronger and healthier than my meat eating counterparts!
      You might be interested to know, the couple that have just run 366 Marathons in 366 days, breaking the world record are Vegan!!
      And they are both in their 60′s

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  • Kelsey

    Excellent article. I was a vegetarian (pescatarian) for almost four months before I quit because
    1) the food tasted horrible
    2) I found the awful truth about soy and it’s damaging effects on human health
    3) I really love meat. :)

  • A.Stev

    Ever notice how whenever there’s an article that’s against veganism that before long the vegan hordes have descended upon the comment section to unleash a whirlwind of illogical and nonsensical comments with a mysteriously high amount of upvotes?

    It’d be funny if it weren’t so utterly, utterly sad.

    • Jon

      Yup, much easier to just call it nonsense ans ignore all the evidence… very convincing…. much like the author who is ignoring most of the comments challenging his “nonsense” while welcoming all those that support his position.

    • Giovanni Campanella

      Not as funny as comments that explain absolutely nothing.

  • jua

    …he was getting older each year, i think that had more of an impact.

    • Jml

      No it wouldn’t not if your young!!! The vegan REALLY IS BAD FOR YOU DON’T DO EVER!!!!

  • Solkatt

    Dave! you shouldn’t be lying for your own gains.. your article are full of disinformation.. but you really lose your face when you defend your absurd theories agains people who are onto you in the comments.. for a guy who gained 20 IQ you are not very smart when trying to hide the fact that you just want to make money at the cost of truth.. and by spreading disinformation about Veganism you are also indirectly responsible for the death of numerous more animals than the regular meat eater since you have claimed a position of authority and people listen to you and your opinions and you may be influating there dietary choices into causing more suffering and death in this world.. shame on you!

  • NoMoreLies

    deleting posts instead of answearing them when they point out that you are spreading disinformation for personal economic gain does not help your case!

  • http://www.facebook.com/josh.alterman Josh Alterman

    It’s a silly article in my opinion. Lewis, like many athletes who break world records, slowed down for a year or so afterwards, then got injured… He made a huge comeback in 1996 which the article doesn’t mention. Furthermore, this entire theory is being based off of one individual athlete. Hardly scientific to say the least. And this claim of this “vegan trap” is a scare tactic. Where is his evidence to back this up? Then to top it all off he ends the article with three “facts” we have heard a million times before. Athletes need protein, vegans can be anemic, vegans can lack B12. We all know improper vegan diets can lack these things but that with the finest adjustment, those issues are not only easily solvable, but prehistoric news.

    • Jon

      Prehistoric news – precisely what you’d expect from cave-dwellers who have been fighting against every shred of evidence showing how damaging meat and dairy is both to human health and the environment. Let them give themselves cancer. The world doesn’t need them.

      • Pan

        if vegan diet is awesome, why are there ex vegans? only a snobbish person from a first world country like you can make such a statement about prehistoric people. When is earth more environmentally damaged, 200, 2000 years above or now?

        • Giovanni Campanella

          There’s ex meat eaters too, does that prove anything?

          Maybe it was a bit overboard, but your response doesn’t logically explain anything.

  • Kati

    Great article!

  • Johan

    Wow. You managed to get all the prejudice and pseudo-science into one article. I think you should stick to what you know – whatever that is. Judged on this article, I’m surprised you’ve even found an audience. Sounds like Fox News Health Facts.

    • Giovanni Campanella

      All corporate media is BS, not just Fox News. If you think Fox News is bad but the rest are ‘okay’ or ‘not as bad’ then you are a product of corporate media.

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  • Iain

    Yes – Vegans don’t get 3 major nutrients – but Omnivores don’t get 7 major nutrients!! See here for some proper science rather than heresay…http://nutritionfacts.org/video/omnivore-vs-vegan-nutrient-deficiencies-2/

  • cobalamin

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  • Diplomat

    The author of this article uses a combination of bad research and bad logic to arrive at a conclusion that only a paid researcher for the massive meat and diary industry would love. Mr. Lewis may have declined as he aged, but you can bet your bottom dollar that his internal organs are faring much better on his veg*an diet and he’ll enjoy a long and healthful life. Unlike the meat eaters, who spend the last 25 years of their lives in and out of hospitals, if they survive the high incidence of cancers and heart disease.

    • Laurie

      I’d bet all my dollars in between that his diet won’t help him. Even in his heyday, he admitted to taking performance enhancing drugs– nothing like another Lance Armstrong to be the vegan poster athlete. The longest lived people in the world eat meat, so the idea that eating meat will shorten lives isn’t supported by anything but vegan fantasy.

  • Lex Parsimoniae

    Late to the game but to everyone touting being a vegan is optimal and some aussie ultra marathoner as best in the world… check out this guy.

    Shattered the record by 15 min. And what did he eat before the race? A lot of bacon.

    http://www.meandmydiabetes.com/2012/08/11/western-states-100-low-carber-wins-ultramarathon-steve-phinney-and-jeff-volek-study/

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  • nazia

    There’s pros and cons to every diet. Have whatever diet you please and don’t start a riot about it. If you want to start a new diet, base it on the right reasons not due to some misguided information. I’m a meat eater but I could never be as crazy as the guy who wrote this crap. I think age is a problem in this story not diet. So, bitches please.

  • Dtrick

    Is the author so on edge about veganism because of his ED or maybe he is constipated? Two things vegans don’t experience. What the author is not acknowledging is that Carl Lewis was past a sprinter’s peak age, but still winning. Attribute that success to his diet. I’m 41 and am training for my first half marathon. Veganism allows you to recover quicker after workouts and it keeps you light all while being able to eat as much as you want.

    • FartNoMore

      Not in my experience at all. I was vegan for several years and I tried my best to be healthy about it. Superfood? Fine, I’ll eat it every day! Tastes like dirt but is good for me? Fine, I’ll eat it every day! Organic is much better? Fine, I’ll pay top dollar for organic, too! I ended up with aching joints, went very grey, lost a lot of muscle, generally felt weak and was usually bloated with plant matter yet frequently crapping my brains out due to the high-fiber diet. Reminded me of the old joke from the 80s: what do you call a vegetarian with diarrhea? Salad Shooter™! (it was an infomercial product with a silly jingle). The funny thing about going so grey was that it seemed to happen the more I ate kale and spinach and wheatgrass, all things which are supposed to REVERSE grey hair, according to some liars. Well, it turns out kale is very high in oxylates and actually it turns sheep’s wool grey when they use it in feed. The high oxylate content (also in my hemp protein) was also probably why my joints hurt and my sides hurt in the morning, since it creates little rock formations that lodge in your joints or form kidney stones.)

      I have been back on a paleo diet for about 6 months and am hoping my grey might go away. I doubt it. But, at least I’m not bloated and not weak anymore. My dry, cracking skin is healing up nicely, too. My joints don’t hurt, I’m way more flexible (I meditate cross-legged now without killing my knees and I can walk down the street without my ankles hurting for no reason). And I never wake up with sharp pains in my side anymore, either. My hair looks thicker, btw. I hate to eat animals, I really do, but I simply was not able to maintain my health even trying to follow the best vegan advice I could find.

  • LC

    I know that when I was in college, the first year there was very little meat to eat (it was mostly fried patty crap), so I ended up eating a lot of peanut butter and jelly sandwiches. By the end of the year, I could no longer get my heavy lifts up. I was on the volleyball and tracks teams, and I was so weak from training and lifting that I begged my Mom to start sending me canned tuna, chicken, etc. I got strong again after I started eating the canned meat.

  • Daniel Huertas

    funny how a ‘vegan diet’ can be so generalized.. I could call myself a ‘vegan’ or follow a ‘vegan diet’.. then go back home, eat lots of white rice, white bread, white pasta.. some vegetables, fake meats, fake chicken, fake sausages, still drinking coke and pepsi, oreos, lots of sugar, lots of vegetable oils… and then get VERY sick.. and blog saying “Vegan diet SUCKS”… you know what i mean?

    if you put all the essential nutrients we need for our diet a GOOD one.. one by one.. Everything you can find a plant based diet.. (B12 exception, by choice because this bacteria was removed from the water we drink along with other bad diseases, also the use of pesticides removed it from the soils where our crops come from).

    I dare you to balance a well balanced omnivore diet with a vegan diet and they BOTH will meet the requirements for a long and healthy life.. (taking in consideration that eating 1 egg and a half per day would be the top of your daily recommended intake of cholesterol.. not counting the other animal sources you would have in that same day.. so yup, it would be VERY limited in animal products anyways)

    • risasperson

      Yours is the only comment so far in this entire thread that’s reasonable. I’m a vegan marathoner who performs far better now than before I went vegan. I could go into this for a long time, debunking everyhting I’ve seen, but it won’t change a mind. I”ll just say this. The best article ever on this subject is “Why Vegans and Paleos Should Stop Hating Each Other”. The author goes into depth about how the two groups have a lot in common, but here it is one sentence: if you set aside the meat thing–which admittedly is huge, the two groups have a LOT in common. Good reading: http://www.nomeatathlete.com/vegans-and-paleos

      Not so shameless plug: like my facebook page! https://www.facebook.com/TheMeatlessMarathoner

  • Notvegan

    A vegan diet will never be protein deficient if you don’t allow that to happen.

  • Poon Man

    I love how you didn’t even reply to DavidL’s comment which is the first comment on this page. You didn’t answer it because you don’t have an answer and because you are wrong and you know this article is rubbish.

  • VeganTiger

    Your link about B12 doesn’t work, so here’s one that does: “It is the position of the American Dietetic Association that appropriately planned vegetarian diets, including total vegetarian or vegan diets, are healthful, nutritionally adequate, and may provide health benefits in the prevention and treatment of certain diseases.”

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19562864

    You should contact them and tell them to wait another 10 years. Tell them you know something they don’t, and that all vegans are going to drop dead in 10 years. I’m sure they’ll listen to you.

  • Conscious Flexitarian

    Where do you want me to start? Nice assumptions you make with nothing to back them up. Fact – there are plants that contain more protein per calorie than beef. (and yes, complete protien) The protein argument is absurd. 80% of long-term vegans are B12 deficient? Where did you pull that out of your A? I don’t think 80% of vegans have been tested to even make this claim. B12 is in meat because it’s made by bacteria, which rotting flesh is full of. It’s not hard to get with a vegan diet, at all. Chimps seem to do ok not eating any meat and they need B12 too. HMMM?

    Animal protein creates metabolic acidosis which leaches calcium from your bones causing osteoporosis. USA eats the most dairy AND has the most cases of osteoporosis..coincidence? I could go on, but I won’t, because you’re about as bulletproof as a rain coat. Perhaps you’d like to ask the most successful and injury-free tight-end in the history of the NFL, Tony Gonzalez, how he has done it as a vegan?

    What do you think animals are eating to get the nutrients in them that you claim we need to eat? PLANTS!

    If you want to eat cows in a humane and sustainable manner, I’m fine with that, but don’t use shady “studies” and omit information when trying to educate people on the “dangers” of eating plants. You come off as a propaganda shill or an ignorant sales man. Neither are flattering.

    Do some research and present a full and educated argument.

    You’re readers deserve better than this.

  • Rene

    Dave please read the 80/10/10 diet book.

  • marshmallowhail

    Pedantic point about tractor kills (we kill things every time we move) undermines the article but it’s nice to know the facts about Carl.

  • Adam Stewart

    Instead of listening to one of the greatest athletes of all time, I’m supposed to trust the views on nutrition of some guy who wrote a blog whose athletic accomplishments include…. nothing? Article overlooks Lewis’ success later in life after his injury, as well as the fact that at age 30 he was well beyond prime for T&F world-class athletes. Also fails to comment on other vegan athletes, such as Scott Jurek, Rich Roll, Mac Danzig, Bruce Pearl, Frank Medrano and how about life-long vegetarian, Herschel Walker (guy is a beast!) Many Olympic and elite athletes switch to plant-based diets in the weeks leading up to competition, as many nutritionists at this level recommend.
    And tractor kills? Is that a joke? You can grow vastly more produce per acre than grass-fed beef and pasture raised farm animals are the leading contributor to loss of forests, and thereby loss of habitat and biodiversity. Not to mention the eradication of predators from the food chain, such as wolves and foxes, anywhere near cattle farms to protect the precious beef steaks. Absolutely absurd and misleading to say pasture animals cause less loss of life than tractor kills. It’s not even close.
    This is the type of moronic misinformation that gets spread when somebody with no background on a topic gets a sliver of information and a website. If you had any self respect at all, you’d do take this down until you do some actual research and get enough knowledge to contribute to the discussion on sports nutrition and environmental awareness.

  • Cambovega

    You talk about the vegan trap, but as a healthy vegan (never felt better in my life and I’m almost 40) I call this article crap! I join Davidl in his arguments. Sorry dude, you have to come up with some better arguments next time…

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